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38 minutes ago, Thor said:

Maybe not at the very top, but I've usually seen it alongside the other critically acclaimed Goldsmith scores, also by people who aren't necessarily film score fans - it's CHINATOWN, PATTON, PLANET OF THE APES, ALIEN, BASIC INSTINCT. And PAPILLON. They seem to have the biggest 'clout' in terms of artistic signficance. Not so often THE OMEN, STAR TREK, GREMLINS or other more popular fare. 

I agree with you on this.

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To be more specific, I think the theme is very much a musical image of their lust for freedom in dire circumstances. Its wistfulness (or bittersweetness) signals that that their fate is unknown - but that it's also 'open' and hopeful.

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I watched Timeline yesterday.  Horribly bland movie scored by the uncompromisingly dull Brian Tyler.  But I was shocked to hear how good Goldsmith's rejected score to this lousy film was.  Why was his far better score replaced by the far inferior and consistently mundane Tyler?

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9 minutes ago, karelm said:

I watched Timeline yesterday.  Horribly bland movie scored by the uncompromisingly dull Brian Tyler.  But I was shocked to hear how good Goldsmith's rejected score to this lousy film was.  Why was his far better score replaced by the far inferior and consistently mundane Tyler?

According to the filmtracks review, the film was reworked, and Jerry didnt want to rescore anything further at that point.

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19 hours ago, Thor said:

To be more specific, I think the theme is very much a musical image of their lust for freedom in dire circumstances. Its wistfulness (or bittersweetness) signals that that their fate is unknown - but that it's also 'open' and hopeful.

 

I saw it more as a figment of their old life, but there you go.

4 hours ago, karelm said:

I watched Timeline yesterday.  Horribly bland movie scored by the uncompromisingly dull Brian Tyler.  But I was shocked to hear how good Goldsmith's rejected score to this lousy film was.  Why was his far better score replaced by the far inferior and consistently mundane Tyler?

 

The face-saving lie was that Jerry couldn't do it, though the truth was that the movie tested horribly and the score also got negative reactions in screenings and Paramount, in true fashion, decided the whole thing could work brilliantly if they just put on a new, more hip composer ét voila, Tyler (on recommendation of William Friedkin, afair). Big surprise, it still sucked.

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TIMELINE is certainly not Richard Donner's shining hour, but I think it's fun. Goldsmith's rejected score is rather lacklustre and streamlined like most of his 2000s efforts, but still better than Tyler's (whose flashy and void action music I've never been able to stomach).

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It has a lot of fine, detailed, if conventional, adventure moments. Though I remain partial to the Hollow Man and the aria in Sum of all Fears, two things that actually feel like Goldsmith found a different vibe in the new millennium that probably would have flourished if cancer didn't strike him.

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Who knows, those you mentioned might have been to below-the-radar to secure JG services, so probably two or three big pictures form the action/adventure mold and a few dark horses á la Powder.

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In addition to any new project from his old and regular collaborators, I'm sure he would have been approached by some young filmmaker wanting the legend's classic sound. We've seen that with other veteran composers over the last two decades -- like David Shire, Gerald Fried, Michel Legrand etc.

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Sure, but Drax is right, more lectures, concerts and workshops, mentor role, probably, and few assignments. Discount all Spielberg/Lucas collaborations from Williams' resume and not a lot is left, either, Horner also was low profile after 2005, Barry & Co. non-existent.

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On 9/10/2020 at 10:23 AM, Jurassic Shark said:

OK. I recently ordered this. Do anybody know if it's a good release of the score, sound-wise?

 

71b40a1D5HL._SL1005_.jpg

 

71EsWCLr62L._SL1343_.jpg

It is the OST plus four additional tracks from the film stem, hence ugly fade-ins/fade-outs and wrong pitch. The sadly strictly limited Quartet Records release is one of the best releases they ever did.

 

By the way, for me the score is Top 5 Goldsmith. Such a thoroughly composed and emotionally subtle work.

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1 hour ago, Brundlefly said:

It is the OST plus four additional tracks from the film stem, hence ugly fade-ins/fade-outs and wrong pitch.

 

Bummer. At least I can delete those non-OST tracks on my CD player.

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On 9/10/2020 at 12:25 AM, Jurassic Shark said:

How well regarded is the score to Papillon? @Yavar Moradi?


Sorry for the late reply, but I think it's one of Goldsmith's greatest scores. Probably top 10 for me. For my colleague Clark at The Goldsmith Odyssey, it is his #1 favorite Goldsmith score.

 

Yavar

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13 hours ago, publicist said:

It has a lot of fine, detailed, if conventional, adventure moments. Though I remain partial to the Hollow Man and the aria in Sum of all Fears, two things that actually feel like Goldsmith found a different vibe in the new millennium that probably would have flourished if cancer didn't strike him.

Yeah. HOLLOW MAN really stands out amongst his latter output!

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I didn't see the video on this thread earlier, so here it is.

 

 

First time I've seen orchestral contractor Isobel Griffiths. She's cute.

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I just received the 2015 Intrada IN HARMS WAY.*

The claim at the time was it was a BIG improvement over the SLCD release, having been taken from original stereo LP masters.

NOT to.my ears.

Intrada is very subdued while the SLCD I bright an punchy.

Any thoughts?

 

*I know INTRADA has since reissued it with music taken from three track session masters

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Technically, this is a Blu-ray update, but I thought it made sense to include it here, since the score is well-known and distinctive: Freud is at last coming to home video in North America (in Blu-ray, no less!), according to The Digital Bits

 

Quote

Also coming in 2021 from KL Studio Classics are Peter Hunt’s Wild Geese II (1985) and John Huston’s Freud: The Secret Passion (1962).

 

https://thedigitalbits.com/columns/my-two-cents/101520-1400

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On 9/19/2020 at 8:39 PM, Matt C said:

I didn't see the video on this thread earlier, so here it is.

 

First time I've seen orchestral contractor Isobel Griffiths. She's cute.

What on earth possessed Goldsmith into thinking a ponytail was a good look for him?

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3 minutes ago, Bayesian said:

What on earth possessed Goldsmith into thinking a ponytail was a good look for him?

It was the source of all his powers...don't diss the ponytail ;-) To be fair, compared to his bouffant 80's look, it's a considerable improvement.

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On 10/4/2020 at 8:53 AM, bruce marshall said:

I just received the 2015 Intrada IN HARMS WAY.*

The claim at the time was it was a BIG improvement over the SLCD release, having been taken from original stereo LP masters.

NOT to.my ears.

Intrada is very subdued while the SLCD I bright an punchy.

Any thoughts?

 

*I know INTRADA has since reissued it with music taken from three track session masters

 

People always rush to claim the latest remaster sounds better, usually as a coping mechanism to justify their purchase.

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Someone's been taking some naughty photos!

 

I have no idea how a (rather messy) re-engraving of my old arrangement ended up down there. It caught me totally by surprise the first time I saw it.

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3 hours ago, PuhgreÞiviÞm said:

 

People always rush to claim the latest remaster sounds better, usually as a coping mechanism to justify their purchase.

 

Rationalisation in action.

 

6 hours ago, Bayesian said:

What on earth possessed Goldsmith into thinking a ponytail was a good look for him?

 

He was probably too busy scoring movies to get a haircut.

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