Jump to content

The Official Ennio Morricone Thread


Muad'Dib
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • 3 weeks later...

https://www.musicbox-records.com/fr/cd-musiques-de-films/11257-ennio-morricone-musiques-de-films-1964-2015-volume-2.html

 

Looks like the big Morricone set is getting a Volume 2. Who can identify the scores?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Just to let anyone thinking of getting the new Morricone: Cinema Suites for Violin and Orchestra album and buying it from 7Digital (https://uk.7digital.com/artist/marco-serino-orchestra-haydn-di-bolzano-e-trento-and-andrea-morricone/release/morricone-cinema-suites-for-violin-and-orchestra-18738180), they have somehow screwed up the file upload. On the website, the first six tracks are all marked track 1, same for the next half dozen marked as 2 etc. but in reality, all of the tracks marked 1 are the same track repeated, so basically you only get the first few tracks (see screen shot from my iTunes library... the track names are right, but you'll notice the first six tracks are all the same length). I've emailed customer support to ask them to fix it but just wanted to let people know and will update on the outcome. It's also at Presto Classical but was actually more expensive (which is unusual) and there were a couple of other things I wanted from 7Digital so I got it from there instead.

 

From what I've heard so far, it's a great album so I can't wait to hear the rest! Definitely a fine companion to the Yo-Yo Ma cello album.

Screen Shot 2022-01-18 at 11.42.49.png

21 minutes ago, Tom Guernsey said:

Just to let anyone thinking of getting the new Morricone: Cinema Suites for Violin and Orchestra album and buying it from 7Digital (https://uk.7digital.com/artist/marco-serino-orchestra-haydn-di-bolzano-e-trento-and-andrea-morricone/release/morricone-cinema-suites-for-violin-and-orchestra-18738180), they have somehow screwed up the file upload. On the website, the first six tracks are all marked track 1, same for the next half dozen marked as 2 etc. but in reality, all of the tracks marked 1 are the same track repeated, so basically you only get the first few tracks (see screen shot from my iTunes library... the track names are right, but you'll notice the first six tracks are all the same length). I've emailed customer support to ask them to fix it but just wanted to let people know and will update on the outcome. It's also at Presto Classical but was actually more expensive (which is unusual) and there were a couple of other things I wanted from 7Digital so I got it from there instead.

 

From what I've heard so far, it's a great album so I can't wait to hear the rest! Definitely a fine companion to the Yo-Yo Ma cello album.

Screen Shot 2022-01-18 at 11.42.49.png

Update: 7Digital will request a "redelivery from the record label"... given that could take a random amount of time, I went for a refund and have bought it from Presto Classical (https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/9264214--morricone-cinema-suites-for-violin-and-orchestra) as it's only £1 more in CD quality FLAC, plus you get a digital booklet from Presto that 7Digital don't do. All tracks appear to be present and correct!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

Is there any kind of fan consensus of EM's best score? Myself, I would probably have to answer Once Upon a Time in America. The score is striking and filled with a kind of old world melancholy. The score aches with pain and poverty.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

31 minutes ago, artguy360 said:

Is there any kind of fan consensus of EM's best score?

 

I'd say that THE GOOD THE BAD AND THE UGLY, ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST, ONCE UPON A TIME IN AMERICA, THE MISSION, CINEMA PARADISO, THE LEGEND OF 1900, and THE UNTOUCHABLES, would all be on that list.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

48 minutes ago, Naïve Old Fart said:

 

I'd say that THE GOOD THE BAD AND THE UGLY, ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST, ONCE UPON A TIME IN AMERICA, THE MISSION, CINEMA PARADISO, THE LEGEND OF 1900, and THE UNTOUCHABLES, would all be on that list.

 

Truth to be said, some of them are only there because US audiences are familiar with them, not necessarily because they are so exceptional.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Once Upon a Time in the West is by far my favorite. However, his career was so long and sprawling, he did so many movies (over 400, I think?), I'm pretty sure there is some hidden gems.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 18/07/2022 at 12:01 PM, publicist said:

Truth to be said, some of them are only there because US audiences are familiar with them, not necessarily because they are so exceptional.

The Untouchables is far from outstanding for example...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 18/07/2022 at 8:11 PM, Koray Savas said:

Morricone has countless gems throughout his repertoire, but Once Upon A Time In The West is still my favorite score of all time.

 

 

Is there a specific edition of the soundtrack you'd recommend?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not a fan of the Spaghetti Western era... so for the 60s and 70s, compilations does it better for me than the whole scores.

 

I don't know your knowledge of the instrumental music of the late 60s to the 80s... but women humming on instrumental music... it was copied a used a lot by MANY... we kind of got bored by this... and does it have aged well... Well, I'm not so sure.

 

But there are classics... So actually, to make it short, I like a lot this kind of little "essentials" playlist:

 

image.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, Smeltington said:

 

Is there a specific edition of the soundtrack you'd recommend?

The RCA FRANCE expansion.

Or, any expansion!

All- time classic!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, Smeltington said:

 

Is there a specific edition of the soundtrack you'd recommend?

The hypothetic future proper modern remaster with no stereo crossphasing and stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wonder if it'll happen. And from the few Morricone scores I've listened to, it seems like custom edits may be the best listening experience, to avoid repetition.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Smeltington said:

I wonder if it'll happen. And from the few Morricone scores I've listened to, it seems like COMPILATIONS may be the best listening experience, to avoid repetition.

 

FIXED! ;)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

May I suggest you these two:

 

Secondary, 2 of 25

 

Secondary, 4 of 15

 

The second is mainly made of re-recordings (tracks 20 to 23 are bonus tracks), made by the maestro himself, in a session organized by Tarantino, recorded "live" on vinyl at Abbey Road in 2016.

 

This CD features a selection from this session, you need the LPs to get the whole thing.

 

Ennio Morricone and Quentin Tarantino together at Abbey Road for the first  time to launch 'The Hateful Eight' soundtrack – Ennio Morricone

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, Smeltington said:

I wonder if it'll happen. And from the few Morricone scores I've listened to, it seems like custom edits may be the best listening experience, to avoid repetition.

 

It's deceiving, Morricone is the only film composer i know of where there's always a dozen things i never heard of, even if i collect his stuff for decades. The problem is not so much the repetition (which is a given for the different approach to scoring movies in european cinema), but that you need to be really dedicated to find out about the many obscure things he did (that often were the better and more inspired originals to xerox stuff like 'The Untouchables').

 

The first and most basic question to even go there: which mode of Morricone you like best? He has several clearly defined styles and once you pinned down there's a chance you'll find something truly extraordinary in that corner you never heard of.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

John Zorn recommended nine Morricone works when he wrote his long tribute post about Morricone. At the bottom of this post.

 

Tribute to Ennio Morricone by John Zorn
THE MAESTRO
 
Ennio Morricone was more than one of the world’s greatest soundtrack composers—he was one of the world’s greatest composers. For me his work stands with Bach, Mozart, Debussy, Ellington and Stravinsky in achieving that ultra rare fusion of heart and mind. Morricone was a true maestro who, thru the medium of music, came to understand the soul and its workings, bringing beauty and truth to the world, enriching our lives with a vision that was both pure and eternally youthful. His work is timeless.
 
Morricone has been a huge influence and a constant artistic inspiration since I first encountered his music in 1967. The Ecstasy of Gold from The Good, The Bad and The Ugly hit me with the same power that Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring, Ives’ 4th Symphony and Edgar Varese’s Arcana had, with its complex rhythmic invention, uniquely original sound world, lush romantic sweep and soaring sense of lyricism. His work has become a part of both my conscious, and my subconscious—indeed part of the very fabric of my being.
 
Embracing the lyricism of his Italian heritage, his gift for melody was extraordinary. He was one of those magical musicians who could make an unforgettable melody with a ‘fistful’ of notes (dare we compare the five notes of his famous ‘coyote call’ in The Good Bad and The Ugly with the four opening notes of Beethoven’s 5th Symphony?) Ennio's meticulous craftsmanship, unique ear for orchestration, harmony, melody and rhythm resulted in music that was perfectly balanced in every way, and as with all master composers—every note is there for a reason. Change one note, one rhythm, one rest and there is diminishment.
 
Having roots in both the world of popular music as well as the avant-garde, Morricone was an innovator, and he overcame each new challenge with a fresh approach. Like all great artists he retained a curiosity and childlike sense of wonder throughout his life. In awe of nature, he was constantly growing and learning, and always open to trying new sounds, new instruments, new combinations, rarely drawing from the same well twice. He was a man of unquestioned integrity and character who did not suffer fools gladly. Stories of his responses to inane directorial suggestions are legendary, including one of my favorites—“In the history of music nothing like that has ever happened—nor will it ever happen.” He lived a relatively simple life in a beautiful apartment in Rome, waking as early as 430am, taking walks, and composing at his desk for hours on end. He traveled little, but his life and work has had immense resonance and meaning.
 
What needs to be understood is that Morricone was a magician of sound. He had an uncanny ability to combine instruments in original ways—ocarina, slapstick, whistling, electric guitar noises, grunts, electronics and howls in the night—everything was welcome in his sound world if it had dramatic effect. By the 1960s the electric guitar had become central to his sound palette and he was able to blend it into a variety of unusual contexts with dramatic flair. In Svegliati e Uccidi he has the guitarist imitate the rat-a-tat-rat of a machine gun through the amplifier’s spring reverb, and his instruction to ’sound like a spear’ resulted in one of the most intense guitar tones ever recorded—the legendary Once Upon a Time in the West.
 
His mastery of a wide range of genres and instruments made him a musician ahead of his time—and his was a rich and rewarding musical life. He could be exploring extended techniques on a trumpet mouthpiece in a free improvisational context in the morning, write a seductive big band arrangement for a pop singer in the afternoon, and a searing orchestral film soundtrack at night. This kind of openness is the way of the future—and he was a huge and formative role model for me.
 
Morricone’s sonic adventures have touched so many lives in so many ways that it is difficult to imagine a world without it. He is most known for his soundtrack work, but we must never forget his large catalog of “absolute music”—his classical compositions. There the music comes straight from his heart. Of course what he has accomplished in the challenging and often restrictive world of film music is nothing short of miraculous. There, his immense imagination, sharp ear for drama, profound lyricism, sly Puckish sense of humor and huge heart find voice thru a magnificent and masterly musicianship. Artistic freedom was his credo and his impeccable taste and innate sense of energy, space and time was palpable. His work would elevate every film he scored.
 
One of my dearest memories was visiting the Maestro at a New York recording session, circa 1986. He was—as always—a gentleman: elegant, gracious and more than kind to this young fan who stood humbled in front of his hero. We spoke through a translator for much of our conversation, but he took me aside for a few private moments together, and to share some composerly advice on working in the soundtrack medium. I will always remember his words to me that day—“Forget the film—think of the soundtrack record!”
 
Many composers wonder—and may even worry—if their work will live on after they are gone, if their contribution will be remembered and their work treasured. Morricone need have no such fears. His work has been embraced by a huge global community and has deep relevance on both a cultural and an artistic level. He achieved that rare duality of being profoundly influential to both the inner world of musicians as well as to the outside culture and society as a whole. His music is loved. His work is treasured. His work stands on its own merits both in the context of the films he scored and on its own terms as pure music. This was his magic. He was more than a musical figure. He was a cultural icon. He was the Maestro—and I loved him dearly.
 
John Zorn, July 7, 2020
 
Morricone will be sorely missed, but we are blessed with his huge catalog of music which is a gift that will continue to inspire artists, filmmakers, poets, writers and musicians for generations to come.
 
Some suggested listening—
Once Upon a Time in America
Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
Once Upon a Time in the West
The Good, The Bad and The Ugly
Chi Mai
Moses
Svegliati e Uccidi
Il Maestro e Margherita
Citta Violenta
Kan vara en bild av 2 personer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, Smeltington said:

Is there a specific edition of the soundtrack you'd recommend?

The GDM or Beat Records expansions, if you can find them. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I look for a CD edition of "Once Upon a Time in the West" who'll allow me to reproduce the OST.

 

I want to order a correct remastered edition on Discogs, not necessarily the latest one, not a complete edition, just a nice sounding edition.

 

By example, is this 2004 edition OKAY?

 

Secondary, 2 of 4

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I saw this recent release on Discogs, any thought about it?

 

Ennio Morricone, Marco Serino, Orchestra Haydn Di Bolzano E Trento, Andrea Morricone – Cinema Suites For Violin And Orchestra

 

Primary

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Bespin said:

I saw this recent release on Discogs, any thought about it?

 

Ennio Morricone, Marco Serino, Orchestra Haydn Di Bolzano E Trento, Andrea Morricone – Cinema Suites For Violin And Orchestra

 

Primary

I thought it was terrific. An excellent (if somewhat similar, repertoire wise) companion to the album he did with Yo-Yo Ma). Well worth picking up. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quartet just released another Morricone title, here's the description:

 

Red Sonja (Expanded Motion Picture Soundtrack)

 

https://quartetrecords.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/RED-SONJA.jpg

 

Quartet Records, in collaboration with Studio Canal, presents an expanded, remastered edition of Ennio Morricone’s classic sword-and-sorcery score for the Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle RED SONJA (1985), directed by Richard Fleischer and also starring Brigitte Nielsen as Sonja.

Initially conceived as a kind of continuation of the Conan saga started three years earlier by the same producer, Dino de Laurentiis, the original idea was to tie in Sonja’s character with the rest of the Conan universe and create a trilogy featuring the hulky Cimmerian. But the picture eventually became just a loose appendage to the franchise, although it kept the same director as CONAN THE DESTROYER and Schwarzenegger as the main star.

Ennio Morricone, who took over after Basil Poledouris scored the first films, provides a powerful and exciting score dominated by an epic march as the main theme, far away from the Poledouris style. The score also features a beautiful love theme, fierce action cues, adventure music and dark and mystical passages.

RED SONJA was originally released by Varèse Sarabande on an LP (and later on CD) featuring two extremely long tracks labeled “Symphonic Suite for Chorus and Orchestra – Part I & II,” although the music was organized like a regular album—just without separate track titles. In 2010, Perseverance Records released a new edition of the CD, cutting up the suites into tracks and organizing them into mostly chronological order, but not adding new material. This new edition contains all the music from the original album program in stereo (also reorganized in film order) and then the complete score in mono (from the only elements available). Both versions of the score have music that’s not heard in the other—for instance, the main battle theme from the album (“Fighting the Soldiers”) is never heard in such a developed version in the film, while other bits and pieces (like the music for Varna’s escape) were not included on the album. By combining the two programs, this is as complete as RED SONJA can get.

Produced, restored and mastered by Chris Malone, the package comes with a 16-page full-color booklet including in-depth liner notes by Gergely Hubai discussing the film and score. Two-sided cover art features the original poster and the new one created for the 4K restoration in 2022, both designed by the great artist Renato Casaro.

 

Tracklist:

ALBUM STEREO TRACKS

1. Prologue (1:28)

2. Main Title (2:22)

3. The Talisman (1:11)

4. Temple Raid (1:58)

5. Touch It (1:12)

6. Sonja and the Sword Master (1:53)

7. Varna’s Death (2:02)

8. The Gate of Brytag (1:49)

9. Sonja vs. Brytag (1:15)

10. Fighting the Soldiers (3:37)

11. The Talisman II (1:10)

12. The Chamber of Lights (2:02)

13. Sonja Teaches Tarn (1:32)

14. Treasure in the Cavern (2:08)

15. Sonja and Kalidor (1:46)

16. A Fair Fight (1:52)

17. Entering the Castle (2:11)

18. Sonja Defeats the Queen (1:31)

19. End Credits (3:44)  20. Sorcery (0:51)

 

THE FILM SCORE (MONO)

21. Magic Call / Main Title / The Talisman (4:49)

22. Gedren Attack (2:05)

23. The Talisman II / A Way Out (1:40)

24. Varna Getting Away (1:05)

25. Magic Call II (2:06)

26. Varna’s Death (2:02)

27. Sonja Arrives (1:59)

28. Duel I (1:16)

29. Broken Promise (1:54)

30. Sonja Saves the Prince (1:13)

31. The Talisman Arrives (2:16)

32. The Prince Asks / Sonja is Watched (2:34)

33. Duel II (1:33)

34. Sonja and Kalidor (1:32)

35. Sonja and Kalidor Enter the Castle (1:30)

36. Battle (1:14)

37. Silence (1:05)

38. Duel Continues (1:56)

39. Medieval Dawn (End Titles) (4:32)

40. Belly Dancer (bonus track) (0:25)

 
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, May the Force be with You said:

Quartet just released another Morricone title, here's the description:

 

Red Sonja (Expanded Motion Picture Soundtrack)

 

https://quartetrecords.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/RED-SONJA.jpg

 

Quartet Records, in collaboration with Studio Canal, presents an expanded, remastered edition of Ennio Morricone’s classic sword-and-sorcery score for the Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle RED SONJA (1985), directed by Richard Fleischer and also starring Brigitte Nielsen as Sonja.

Initially conceived as a kind of continuation of the Conan saga started three years earlier by the same producer, Dino de Laurentiis, the original idea was to tie in Sonja’s character with the rest of the Conan universe and create a trilogy featuring the hulky Cimmerian. But the picture eventually became just a loose appendage to the franchise, although it kept the same director as CONAN THE DESTROYER and Schwarzenegger as the main star.

Ennio Morricone, who took over after Basil Poledouris scored the first films, provides a powerful and exciting score dominated by an epic march as the main theme, far away from the Poledouris style. The score also features a beautiful love theme, fierce action cues, adventure music and dark and mystical passages.

RED SONJA was originally released by Varèse Sarabande on an LP (and later on CD) featuring two extremely long tracks labeled “Symphonic Suite for Chorus and Orchestra – Part I & II,” although the music was organized like a regular album—just without separate track titles. In 2010, Perseverance Records released a new edition of the CD, cutting up the suites into tracks and organizing them into mostly chronological order, but not adding new material. This new edition contains all the music from the original album program in stereo (also reorganized in film order) and then the complete score in mono (from the only elements available). Both versions of the score have music that’s not heard in the other—for instance, the main battle theme from the album (“Fighting the Soldiers”) is never heard in such a developed version in the film, while other bits and pieces (like the music for Varna’s escape) were not included on the album. By combining the two programs, this is as complete as RED SONJA can get.

Produced, restored and mastered by Chris Malone, the package comes with a 16-page full-color booklet including in-depth liner notes by Gergely Hubai discussing the film and score. Two-sided cover art features the original poster and the new one created for the 4K restoration in 2022, both designed by the great artist Renato Casaro.

 

Tracklist:

ALBUM STEREO TRACKS

1. Prologue (1:28)

2. Main Title (2:22)

3. The Talisman (1:11)

4. Temple Raid (1:58)

5. Touch It (1:12)

6. Sonja and the Sword Master (1:53)

7. Varna’s Death (2:02)

8. The Gate of Brytag (1:49)

9. Sonja vs. Brytag (1:15)

10. Fighting the Soldiers (3:37)

11. The Talisman II (1:10)

12. The Chamber of Lights (2:02)

13. Sonja Teaches Tarn (1:32)

14. Treasure in the Cavern (2:08)

15. Sonja and Kalidor (1:46)

16. A Fair Fight (1:52)

17. Entering the Castle (2:11)

18. Sonja Defeats the Queen (1:31)

19. End Credits (3:44)  20. Sorcery (0:51)

 

THE FILM SCORE (MONO)

21. Magic Call / Main Title / The Talisman (4:49)

22. Gedren Attack (2:05)

23. The Talisman II / A Way Out (1:40)

24. Varna Getting Away (1:05)

25. Magic Call II (2:06)

26. Varna’s Death (2:02)

27. Sonja Arrives (1:59)

28. Duel I (1:16)

29. Broken Promise (1:54)

30. Sonja Saves the Prince (1:13)

31. The Talisman Arrives (2:16)

32. The Prince Asks / Sonja is Watched (2:34)

33. Duel II (1:33)

34. Sonja and Kalidor (1:32)

35. Sonja and Kalidor Enter the Castle (1:30)

36. Battle (1:14)

37. Silence (1:05)

38. Duel Continues (1:56)

39. Medieval Dawn (End Titles) (4:32)

40. Belly Dancer (bonus track) (0:25)

 

I’m in for that. It’s a bit hokey but a lot of fun. I can’t remember if it’s this or Hundra that has diabolical sound but either way I’m guessing this will be an improvement on the existing release. Inevitably disappointing the full score didn’t survive in stereo (I mean, why were they still recording scores in mono in 1985 anyway?!) but surprising how short the score is relative to the length of the film and how long the Conan scores are. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, Tom Guernsey said:

I’m in for that. It’s a bit hokey but a lot of fun. I can’t remember if it’s this or Hundra that has diabolical sound but either way I’m guessing this will be an improvement on the existing release. Inevitably disappointing the full score didn’t survive in stereo (I mean, why were they still recording scores in mono in 1985 anyway?!) but surprising how short the score is relative to the length of the film and how long the Conan scores are. 

Just gave them a listen and Hundra is definitely the worst of the two, but will definitely be happy to have Red Sonja in much better sound. Maybe they'll work some magic on Hundra at some point too. It's a great score, the over the top attack theme with the chorus is great (but significantly less impactful due to the sound). The choral writing sounds like a classical work, Carmina Burana springs to mind (but I don't think it is that). Anyone have any ideas?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wonderful! I was about to buy the Perseverance CD for too much money. Now I get much more for less than 20€. I say, Quartet is on par with La-La Land!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 06/08/2022 at 8:29 AM, Tom Guernsey said:

The choral writing sounds like a classical work, Carmina Burana springs to mind (but I don't think it is that). Anyone have any ideas?

 

Verdi's Dies Irae also comes to mind.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, Muad'Dib said:

 

Verdi's Dies Irae also comes to mind.

Yes I think you’re right. And a little bit of Borodin too I think. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Have cross posted this to this and Quick Questions thread... but did Ennio Morricone score an Agatha Christie adaptation or did I imagine it?! I have a recollection of him saying that he thought Richard Rodney Bennett's music for Murder on the Orient Express was far too grand and upbeat (or something along those lines) but I don't know EM scored a Poirot mystery himself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Tom Guernsey said:

Have cross posted this to this and Quick Questions thread... but did Ennio Morricone score an Agatha Christie adaptation or did I imagine it?! I have a recollection of him saying that he thought Richard Rodney Bennett's music for Murder on the Orient Express was far too grand and upbeat (or something along those lines) but I don't know EM scored a Poirot mystery himself.

@thx99 kindly corrected me that it was Bernard Herrmann who disparaged RRB's score for Murder on the Orient Express.

 

However, still an open question if anyone is aware of Ennio writing a score for a Poirot movie? I thought he did but I might be misremembering that! If so, that would be twice in one day, I'll get my soundtrack fan card confiscated at this rate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, publicist said:

It might have been 'Ripley', a Patricia Highsmith adaptation.

I don’t think it’s that. That’s the sequel to The Talented Mr Ridley, right? In all honesty, I think I may have my wires crossed and he never did a Poirot movie!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Since I’m stuck at London’s most/least terrible international airport near Croydon, a few thoughts on the Ennio documentary that Giuseppe Tornatore made a couple of years ago but including a lengthy interview with the maestro before his death. I guess some of this counts as spoilers if you would rather learn things first hand:

 

  • It’s a superb documentary. Fascinating and wide ranging. Made with love by Tornatore. I guess anyone who’s made a film like Cinema Paradiso is going to have the right artistic temperament to celebrate Morricone in a way that makes you well up a little by the end but manages to cover a pretty good chunk of his career. I’m sure everyone will find at least one great score or collaboration missing but if you accept that as inevitable, you realise how well they did to cover so much.
  • I learned a surprising amount. I had no idea he was such a famous arranger before film scores largely took over. Him doing that kind of work seems even more unlikely in hindsight given his temperament but it clearly informs his experimentation with unusual sounds and ideas.
  • A Fistful of Dynamite’s original title is Giù La Testa and it’s also a known as Duck, You Sucker. I also seem to forget that and I have the score with the Italian title in my library but then can’t find it if I see either of the English titles. Then I figure it out. Again.
  • It was heartening but also depressing to see all the various directors interviewed getting so excited about the music he had written for their movies and being able to hum the themes. I wish that more directors these days treated music with such reverence and as an integral part of the film making art.
  • He was robbed at the Oscars for The Mission. I mean, great train robbery robbed. Everyone appeared to acknowledge this. I’m glad he ultimately got both a lifetime achievement award and a competitive statue but The Mission was clearly a very special score to him that undoubtedly lifted the film (even though he originally felt it didn’t need music, but fortunately changed his mind!). It’s not like the winning score (Round Midnight) was even another classic. As they pointed out, most of the music wasn’t original to the film.
  • He had quite a conflicting view on referencing existing music in his scores and made me wonder how Terence Malick got a free pass to use the portions of Saint-Saens in Days of Heaven. Ennio talked quite positively about the experience which seems surprising given how dead against this he appeared to be elsewhere clearly shooting down many directors when they made suggestion. Guess it was only when he wanted to!
  • Some of the clips of older films had astonishingly good quality, some impressive mastering has gone on. I clearly need to check some of these movies out too. European cinema is way more graphic than Hollywood! It’s a 15 rating in the U.K. which is almost a shame as it’s just due to the clips but guess kids aren’t likely to be rushing to watch this but still.
  • No mention of Bruno Nicolai. Guess their falling out was hard and permanent but seems quite an omission.

I’m sure a few more things struck me but have forgotten. Definitely a highly recommended for anyone with even a glancing interest in his work but just as much for anyone who likes film music or cinema. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, Tom Guernsey said:

A Fistful of Dynamite’s original title is Giù La Testa and it’s also a known as Duck, You Sucker. I also seem to forget that and I have the score with the Italian title in my library but then can’t find it if I see either of the English titles. Then I figure it out. Again.

Duck, You Sucker is the actual title. It was rereleased as A Fistful Of Dynamite in US markets when it didn’t perform at the box office under the actual name. I prefer Once Upon A Time In The Revolution. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, Koray Savas said:

Duck, You Sucker is the actual title. It was rereleased as A Fistful Of Dynamite in US markets when it didn’t perform at the box office under the actual name. I prefer Once Upon A Time In The Revolution. 

Google translate brilliantly translates Giù La testa as “down the head” which I guess does essentially imply ducking! Cool additional title but three is enough for me to remember lol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Quartet has released another Ennio

 

https://quartetrecords.com/product/arabian-nights/

 

If you only glance at the cover art, you might miss....well, just click the mag glass icon...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines.