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JM_1234321

What do "2m3", "insert" and "D2-T O2" mean?

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Hi.

In film scoring can someone please explain what the 'cue' symbols (eg) "2m3", "insert" and "D2-T O2" mean in detail?

A link would be great.

I am googeling "score cues", "cue lists" etc but can't get any good hits.

The symbols are the same in every score. They appear to be common to the `business rather than score specific.

Thanks for any help.

JM

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To use your examples:

2m3 - this is a cue number. The "2" is the reel number (A film is split into reels). "M3" represents the cue number of the reel.

Insert is, simply, an insert. It's inserted into a certain place in a cue, often replacing a section of the original cue.

I'm not sure where you found "D2-T O2". The only thing I can think of is you mean D2 T02, which would mean "Disc 2, Track 02".

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To use your examples:

2m3 - this is a cue number. The "2" is the reel number (A film is split into reels). "M3" represents the cue number of the reel.

Insert is, simply, an insert. It's inserted into a certain place in a cue, often replacing a section of the original cue.

I'm not sure where you found "D2-T O2". The only thing I can think of is you mean D2 T02, which would mean "Disc 2, Track 02".

To specify, the 'M3' part is short for 'Music cue 3', I believe.

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No, M stands for 'music'. But since the following number is the cue number, it's natural to call it 'music cue'. I agree, however, that it would be more intelligible if it was a C instead of an M.

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Was that a genuine question? I only ask because when I saw that, I thought "How could you not know what R2-D2 is!", and then I saw Jason's reply and I thought "There's actually a musical term!"

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The legend goes that whilst a ludicrous film maker who went by the name of George Lucas was trying to find a name for a mysterious robotic invention of his, somebody walked inside his room and asked for R2-D2 (Reel 2, Dialogue 2) from Lucas' film American Grafitti. The inventor found that to be an excellent name for his invention, and now the little robot is called R2-D2.

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