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mahler3
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Listening too from Norway! Right now, it's Bernstein's TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD.

More about the early years, PRETTY PLEASE!!! Would be awesome to hear him talk about DADDY-O and other assignments that aren't often talked about.

Crossing my fingers that it won't just be a long string of anecdotes we have heard a million times before....and just the famous things.

The start, about his dad and how he started in music was wonderful. And some little bits about his early years in the studios...

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The Fiddler on the Roof memories with the anecdote about Marc Chagall's involvement with the main titles and how JW composed everything for it himself were equally interesting.

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This old music is so so great! i haven't heard some of it before but it is 100% recognizable and vintage JW! I wonder why he doesn't talk more about his early films and youth more - I don't just mean in this interview since after all there, is so much ground to cover in two hours, but why he doesn't write a memoir or work with that Steve Jobs author whos other books include Einstein, Mark Twain. I think JW stands up there with them.

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Wait - this guy is 80 years of age? I hear the tone and timbre of a man in his fifties, in his prime. John sounds absolutely great. Wow!

Indeed! He sounds so youthful and energetic. :)

And it is still a marvel to hear, how down to earth and unassuming Williams is. He could be a dictionary definition of humble.

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Listening too from Norway! Right now, it's Bernstein's TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD.

More about the early years, PRETTY PLEASE!!! Would be awesome to hear him talk about DADDY-O and other assignments that aren't often talked about.

Crossing my fingers that it won't just be a long string of anecdotes we have heard a million times before....and just the famous things.

The start, about his dad and how he started in music was wonderful. And some little bits about his early years in the studios...

It was.

Sadly, now we're into all too-familiar territory for us hardcore fans (all the 5-note permutations for CE3K, the inception of the JAWS theme etc.) -- but still, I'm just happy to hear him talk, so I won't be too demanding.

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Listening too from Norway! Right now, it's Bernstein's TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD.

More about the early years, PRETTY PLEASE!!! Would be awesome to hear him talk about DADDY-O and other assignments that aren't often talked about.

Crossing my fingers that it won't just be a long string of anecdotes we have heard a million times before....and just the famous things.

The start, about his dad and how he started in music was wonderful. And some little bits about his early years in the studios...

It was.

Sadly, now we're into all too-familiar territory for us hardcore fans (all the 5-note permutations for CE3K, the inception of the JAWS theme etc.) -- but still, I'm just happy to hear him talk, so I won't be too demanding.

Exactly my feeling. Just a joy to be able to listen to him :)

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Is the question on whether or not JW knows his themes will be familiar when he writes them the first fan question that was asked?

Yes I think so.
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I bet Johnny's points went up considerably in your eyes. One could say he is a classy fellow, couldn't one? :lol:

I can't imagine Williams ever getting angry. He sounds so sweet and mellow and nice. Perhaps his tone would change a bit to more commanding but that might be it. :P

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Sadly, now we're into all too-familiar territory for us hardcore fans (all the 5-note permutations for CE3K, the inception of the JAWS theme etc.) -- but still, I'm just happy to hear him talk, so I won't be too demanding.

As a hard core John Williams fan THIS point of his career is never sad. I could listen to the man for hours talking about these scores no matter how much of the information I already know.

-Erik-

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I bet Johnny's points went up considerably in your eyes. One could say he is a classy fellow, couldn't one? :lol:

I can't imagine Williams ever getting angry. He sounds so sweet and mellow and nice. Perhaps his tone would change a bit to more commanding but that might be it. :P

very much so. ah... who would've thought...

his voice is very soothing and the airing time for this interview couldn't have been more perfect... goodnight!

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I missed this :( Any recording of it coming soon?

I think you can listen to this for a week at ClassicFM and you should be able to use the postal code trick (mentioned above by karelm) to listen from abroad. ;)

Here is a direct link.

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You can tell JW's responses were edited a bit to get rid of some of his long pauses. Maybe one of the labels will release a 2 disc set, featuring the complete interview on the first CD and the edited-for-a-better-listening-experience original interview on the second CD. :P

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Was anyone else dissapointed in this, or was it only me?

First of all, who is this Tommy Pearson guy, anyway? He sounds like he's 12 years old! J.W. is 80 for Pete's sake: get someone way more mature to interview a man of his stature!!

The "early years" stuff was illuminating, and my ears pricked up when he said he played piano on "TKAM". After that, it just became a fauning, clinging, ingratiating, and frankly annoying, piece of hack journalism. Most of the rest of it I knew about already - as I suspect did most jwfaners.

The music choices were inevitable, and dull. The only "intelligent" choices were the main titles to "TTI", and "JE".

Really, the interviewer does not need to drag over J.W.'s career, in the same way that it has been dragged over for the last 30-odd years, but that's Classic fm for ya. It appeals to the average brain-dead, middle-class, middle-England, Daliy Mail-reading dunce that wouldn't know a decent score form a hole in the ground. If you doubt me, just listen to Howard Goodall's so-called tribute to J.W. broadcast 2 days earlier: patronizing, and off-hand.

If you really want a good interview with J.W., then read the transcript of the Films And Filming 1978 interview.

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Yay!! They asked JW one of my questions! Next best thing to talking to him myself! Woohoo!! And now “Ask JW a question by way of a British radio host” can be marked off my things to do before I die list.

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Richard, I agree that the interview was probably billed to be more unique than it was. But it was still probably the best interview JW has ever had, in thata good portion of it was new and interesting.

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One of the best Williams interviews has to be the Q/A at the Thornton School of Music at USC in 2006 for a group of students, where Maestro himself gave a fairly long presentation of his early years and background, again showing how good speaker he is. The questions themselves were less revelatory but still pretty interesting stuff besides the general questions people, even professional musicians, tend to ask. John Burlingame was a great host as well. The interview/Q&A ran for about an hour if I remember correctly and was really fascinating. I do not know however whether the video or videos are available anywhere at the moment.

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I missed this :( Any recording of it coming soon?

I think you can listen to this for a week at ClassicFM and you should be able to use the postal code trick (mentioned above by karelm) to listen from abroad. ;)

Here is a direct link.

Thanks. Listening to it right now!

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Richard!? Bad Summer?

Tommy is more than qualified and is over 40! A simple Google search would have revealed his expansive CV.

Anyway, I stand by billing it as unique and something extra special. How often do we get such a slick, conversational and revealing interview presented to us in a generous two hour broadcast, and with so many excellent 'original' recordings? If some of it was repeated then both JW and Tommy actually highlighted it as being just that. When chatting with somebody in such a friendly and familiar way that's bound to happen.

I personally loved the format too, it could've oh so easily been something along the lines of "that was and this is".

In other news, only 2 months until Lincoln and a concert of all Williams music with the LSO. It's a great year to be a JWFan! :-)

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Richard!? Bad Summer?

Tommy is more than qualified and is over 40! A simple Google search would have revealed his expansive CV.

Anyway, I stand by billing it as unique and something extra special. How often do we get such a slick, conversational and revealing interview presented to us in a generous two hour broadcast, and with so many excellent 'original' recordings? If some of it was repeated then both JW and Tommy actually highlighted it as being just that. When chatting with somebody in such a friendly and familiar way that's bound to happen.

I personally loved the format too, it could've oh so easily been something along the lines of "that was and this is".

Exactly!

-Erik-

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Have a word with yourself, Richard! :D

I have attended many film music concerts with Tommy Pearson presenting and he knows his onions when it comes to film music, make no mistake - he will be presenting the RPO's John Williams concert in October at the Royal Albert Hall, for example (completely sold out, by the way, as is the LSO concert to which Tim refers) and has performed similar duties for the LSO, CBSO, etc. Much as I would have loved to hear Williams quizzed about The Plainsman, Images and Heartbeeps, a) the maestro probably would not remember having scored them and b) most of the Classic FM audience would not have had a clue what they were on about.

I enjoyed the interview very much. I felt that there were enough new insights from Johnny to maintain the interest of the hardcore fans such as us while covering the bases for the casual Classic FM listener, familiar with whatever Williams selections the station deigns to air and no more.

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I would have liked two hours more. Loved it! :znaika:

And never heard Johnny's playing in Mockingbird. :blink:

As a hard core John Williams fan THIS point of his career is never sad. I could listen to the man for hours talking about these scores no matter how much of the information I already know.

(Y)

Edit: Hah, Williams mentioned "T.Newman is really personal and fresh". Exactly what I have said in this forum.

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I listened to half of this interview this morning in my car on my way to work, hope to listen to the rest during the course of the day.

I have to say that it's a pretty good interview, very well made. I love the good-natured, candid overall tone. The criticism I read toward Tommy Pearson is highly unfair. He poses all the right questions and conducts the chat with great command. I don't know what people expect from a Williams interview, but this is really the best and deepest you can get from him. He even goes personal in more than one occasion. I think sometimes we're too demanding from these kind of things. We always expect some kind of "revelation of the deepest secrets" from the words of the artist, but the reality is that music is something quite difficult to verbalize in words. Williams however talks in detail about his work, his creative process and illustrates always clearly his vision about his own music. I don't know what more you can ask from him.

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We always expect some kind of "revelation of the deepest secrets" from the words of the artist, but the reality is that music is something quite difficult to verbalize in words. Williams however talks in detail about his work, his creative process and illustrates always clearly his vision about his own music. I don't know what more you can ask from him.

I concur, but one hopes for some amusing anecdote along the way. The main problem is that the whole theme (filmmusic) is too esoteric for most interviewers (who could blame them?), so they ask sensible general questions, which have the disadvantage of being so shopworn by now you almost can sing along Williams' answers to them.

It would take some intimate knowledge of Williams' older interviews to dig a bit deeper, to avoid getting into too broad subjects or getting into the old Hitchock/Spielberg/Lucas standbys. I would have asked him about his relationship to Lionel Newman or which was the last movie he saw, if he heard a certain score, say LOTR, and what he thought of it. Certainly more interesting than another E. T. or JAWS recollection.

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As someone who interviewed several film composers (I talked with John Debney, Elliot Goldenthal, Howard Shore, Alexandre Desplat, Dave Newman, Christopher Gordon and few others) I know very well that you have to be easy and relaxed when you're posing questions with such personalities. Even though you made your homework and prepared lots of interesting deep questions, you have to be careful to follow the suggestions that come out from the conversation itself. You can't just impose your own agenda over the course of the chat, otherwise the person who's being interviewed could have the impression you're trying to force words into his/her mouth. Of course it depends very much on the overall personality of who you're interviewing and how they feel in that particular day and moment, but one thing I learned from my own chats with those guys is that you don't need to make an impression you're clever and knowledgeable. They appreciate a lot if you mention a lesser-known work of course, but they appreciate even more when it's clear you're listening to what they're saying.

Williams is such a huge personality with a large body of popular work that it's almost inescapable you end up talking about Star Wars, E.T, and Jaws, especially if you're committed to do a piece addressed to a general audience. The great thing about JW is that he never feels bored or annoyed when telling well-known anecdotes and stories. In this sense, he shows always a deep respect for the person who's interviewing him. This is anything but ordinary, especially when we're talking about celebrities of some sorts.

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if he heard a certain score, say LOTR, and what he thought of it.

Why in the world?

The great thing about JW is that he never feels bored or annoyed when telling well-known anecdotes and stories.

Well, i am.

Well it's your problem.

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This was a great interview. Even though it included Thomas Snoozeman. Really interesting topics, really lovely to listen to, and most of all really absorbing.

When he mentioned Barbara and Benny's interactions I felt like I was there at the dinner table with them.

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