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Some new info for anyone interested in these nitty-gritty details (paging @Jay @Disco Stu), plus how much unreleased music there might be (counting the FYC, not very much).     Complete

I don't know if this has been already posted elsewhere, but I link it here for the sake of tidiness:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v96PpTf6DzY (embed is disabled, sorry)  

That was mentioned earlier in this very thread. Just some weird mixup

You could probably make a 2 disc set of the two, mixing all tracks, and you wouldn't lose any flow.

:lol: seems, that Sony has exactly THAT version planned for release!!

http://www.thelincol...com/?soundtrack

Scroll down.....

there's a 22track Version of the Lincoln soundtrack....... :P

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My favourite theme is definitely With Malice Towards None.

Karol

Do you remember when the theme is used in the film? I thought it was only as Lincoln refuses to wear the gloves at the end, and of course during his 2nd inaguration and the end credits, but the FYC has it listed as the third track.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Your link doesn't show any Williams clip. Can you relink?

Not sure if this is what Jamie had tried linking to (or if this is posted elsewhere - I looked, but there's a LOT of pages...), but here's a panel discussion from the creators and actors from "Lincoln." JW is at the end of this clip, last five minutes or so.

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Does it sound like: "Grumble, grumble, harrumph, harrumph"?

Was I at the sessions?! I can't remember being there! Damn my befuddlement! Grumble, harrumph!
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I'm sure it was Hans Zimmer deliberately coughing. Reports have surfaced of him terrorising Williams' recording sessions and sneakily adding synth overlays. Many Orchestrators died to bring us this information.

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Since the BBC thread seems to be attracting little interest, here is a tidbit from it. Williams confirmed that he is writing a ceremonial piece for the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address, to be performed June 6. Given the subject matter, one might wonder how close in spirit the piece will be to the Lincoln score.

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I think a cool piece for the ceremony would be a sort of hybrid between the melodic lines of the Lincoln soundtrack with the style of say, Back to America from Angela's Ashes. But I am most happy that Williams continues to write these sorts of pieces.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi everyone

Back in October 2012, Moviescope magazine in the UK printed an interview / feature article I was commissioned to write for them about aspects of the career of sound designer Gary Rydstrom.

This article has now been archived online (just today) and you can read it here. In the interview Gary Rydstrom mentions JW and so I hope it's of interest and that you enjoy it.

http://www.moviescop...ticking-clocks/

Dream well!

JC

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Thanks very much, Indy4. It was a real treat being able to conduct that interview. You can check out some other interviews I've done right here:

http://www.moviescopemag.com/features/rick-mccallum-reach-for-the-sky/

http://www.moviescopemag.com/features/return-of-the-j3di-putting-star-wars-into-the-3d-universe/

If it's of interest, I'm working on a book at the moment that I was able to interview George Lucas for.

All the best

JC

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
Before we forget all the wonderful music nominated this year for the Academy Award move on to the "next sensation"in the wake of the ceremony, I'd like to take one last chance to encourage my FB friends--- particularly my musician friends--- who have not had the time to listen CLOSELY to Lincoln, to do so. Every note, every choice is a jewel. I'm reminded of one of my teachers in Germany who advised: "Music should be simple-- but NOT simple minded!" John's score is a model of elegance, simplicity, and beauty-- something to treasure, as it is so different from our simple minded Zeitgeist. Please listen--closely--if you haven't already!

- Conrad Pope

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  • 3 months later...

Just listened to the whole OST. Love it. Definitely some heavy Copeland influence. In fact, the motif for the first track is note-for-note stolen from Appalachian Spring! :P But also, of course, heavy influence from A Lincoln Portrait. Still, it has a Williams twist to it (in particular, I heard some of his JFK score in here). Some great bluegrass stuff, too! Can't wait to see the movie!

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Yes the opening 4-note motto that starts the People's House track is a nice homage to Copland or stolen which ever way you want to think about it. And this music is just about as steeped in the sounds of Americana as a Williams score gets so I guess Copland hints are inevitable. :)

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It isn't a Copland motif any more than a rising arpeggio is a Haydn or Mozart motif; it's simply a piece of musical glossary that we associate with Americana (and other things in other contexts). It pre-dates Copland by hundreds and probably thousands of years.

Coming back to the thread: I have to say I was very much taken with how Williams had elaborated on his "Lincoln" score in the three selections I heard last Wednesday in Boston. Especially "Getting Out the Vote" has become an entirely new and different piece, colorful and energetic with lots of motivic development. Drastically changed harmonically, the original material is now super-imposed on swirling clustral/bi- and polytonal figures (a little reminiscent of textures found in the harp concerto as well as in many of his more recent film scores), and imbued with a playfulness that is wonderfully vital and vibrant.

Also "The People's House" and "With Malice Toward None" were significantly embellished, the former with new woodwind doublings in the introductory bars, the latter with a quite extensive obbligato cello part.

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Thank you for the info on the concertitzed pieces from Lincoln Marcus. I have been intrigued how has the Maestro expanded and embellished, as is his wont in concert setting, his musical materials from the score. :)

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Hi there Marcus

Thanks for elaborating on JW's elaborations of the Lincoln material for live performance.

Is my understanding correct: the music that we hear in the movie itself is more fully 'realised' for its presentation on the soundtrack album release of last year ?

Thanks so much

JC

The Films of Pixar Animation Studio to be published October 2013

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It isn't a Copland motif any more than a rising arpeggio is a Haydn or Mozart motif; it's simply a piece of musical glossary that we associate with Americana (and other things in other contexts). It pre-dates Copland by hundreds and probably thousands of years.

I dunno, the orchestration is pretty similar--I think Copland uses both solo clarinet and solo oboe, which is how JW begins the motif. There's also the raised top note--Copland ups it to a different degree that Williams I think, but they both alter the melody in a similar way. The harmonies are also different, but they change on the same notes. The subject matter, the other strong Copland influences throughout the work and Williams' acknowledgements that he really respects Copland confirm these similarities. JW takes the motif to significantly different places later in the piece, but I don't think there's any doubt that without Appalachian Spring, "People's House" would be significantly different.

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Just heard the online broadcast of the Lincoln pieces. I think the concert versions are fabulous. The People's House with the extended trumpet solo is excellent. The performance was problematic, but a good version would rival the sublime nature of Born on the Fourth. Getting out the vote was indeed different; my goodness it was different. Clearly a labor of love by Williams to produce a concert-worthy version of an already excellent piece. With malice toward none was layered, nuanced, and brilliant. That was the one piece on the OST that I thought could use a longer arrangement and this version delivers.

I will need to re-listen was the concert once available, but initial impressions are that Williams has delivered a three-movement suite that will be performed for years to come as an original contribution to Americana music.

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