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Intrada releases new RSNO re-recording of Miklós Rózsa's The Red House

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NTRADA Announces:

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THE RED HOUSE

Composed by MIKLOS ROZSA

Conducted by ALLAN WILSON

Performed by ROYAL SCOTTISH NATIONAL ORCHESTRA

WINCHESTER CATHEDRAL CHAMBER CHOIR

Intrada's latest release in its Excalibur Collection features the premiere of Miklos Rozsa's complete score to the 1947 film The Red House. The Red House stands as one of Miklos Rozsa's most substantial opuses. In no other film of his psychological genre had the composer been offered such a wide spectrum of cinematic pictures to paint musically: from broad pastel scenes of nature, to intimate relationships between the dramatis personae, to moments of exciting physical action and suspense. Most significantly, because it brought the thoughts, fears, and passions of the human subconscious into sharp focus, Miklos Rozsa's music for The Red House must truly be considered the most psychological of all his psychological film scores. The film needed music capable of rich scenic imagery, unnerving mystery and suspense, and potent lyrical passion. Rozsa delivered what some claim to be his greatest score. And it was this passion that drove producer Kevin Kaska and executive producers Paul Talkington and Paul Wing to completely restore the music and engage the Royal Scottish National Orchestra in recording every note. including the unique sound of the theremin which Rozsa used when exploring matters of the mind. The orchestra delivered a spirited, powerful performance that rivals the stunning suite recorded by Charles Gerhardt decades ago.

The Red House, based on a novel by George Agnew Chamberlain and directed by Delmer Daves, tells the story of Pete Morgan (Edward G. Robinson), a reclusive farmer who harbors grim secrets and memories of long-ago love, passion, and murder. He and his devoted sister Ellen (Judith Anderson) have lived years trying to prevent their adopted daughter Meg (Allene Roberts) from learning the truth about her real parents. Meg comes of age, and with the help of her newfound boyfriend Nath Storm (Lon McCallister), becomes determined to unearth the connection between her childhood past, Pete's tightly kept dark mysteries, and a forbidden red house lodged deep within the surrounding Oxhead Woods

INTRADA

Retail Price: $19.99

AVAILABLE NOW

http://store.intrada.com/s.nl/it.A/id.7847/.f

RED HOUSE, THE

Label: Intrada MAF 7122

Date: 1947

Tracks: 33

World premiere all-new recording of masterful Miklos Rozsa score for 1947 Delmer Daves film from George Agnew Chamberlain tale of passion and deception, love and murder, starring Edward G. Robinson, Lon McCallister, Julie London. Rozsa fans have asked us to record this one for years, now they get their wish. Charles Gerhardt recorded 12-minute suite in 1975, offering taste of involved, complex and colorful score. Splendid Gerhardt sound inspired producer Kevin Kaska (who expertly reconstructs entire score) to seek same crisp, detailed sound from Royal Scottish National Orchestra & Westminster Cathedral Chamber Choir... plus composer's beloved ghostly sound for haunted suspense, the theremin. Rozsa's score plays in roughly equal parts sumptuous romance, sinister suspense, violent murder, sunny outdoors, grim seclusion, even the dark human subconscious. You name the emotion, Rozsa captures it. Love theme is widely-spaced, yearning line while dark main theme for titular house, while also widely-spaced, is angled, hard-edged. In fascinating turn of events, perhaps more than with any other score, Rozsa both looks backwards towards aggressive film noir voice while looking forward to rich, sweeping harmonic vernacular of upcoming costume epics, period scores. Results are musically profound. Highlights are many: tender violin solo during "Meg Asks Questions", haunting theremin tones hovering above "The Accusation", florid woodwind runs glistening as "Nath Explores The Woods", modal harmonies of "Graduation Present" that suggest later BEN-HUR, searching material and angelic voices that surge forth during "Meg Finds The Red House", agitated, violent action of "Teller Shoots At Meg", ghostly women's voices with theremin during climactic confrontation... the list goes on and on. Then, when Rozsa and film finish, dynamic score comes to powerful end with glorious, fortissimo major-key coda. One of the great film score endings. Powerful! Rozsa authorities Dan Robbins, Frank DeWald offer scholarly commentary in handsome booklet. Note: complete score would not fit on one CD and we refused to cut precious bars down to fit. As such, musically appropriate spot to change discs was made with Rozsa's musical architecture in mind. (In other words, CD 1 is considerably longer than CD 2.) But we are keeping price same as similar single disc releases! Paul Talkington, Paul Wing nurture entire recording with Kevin Kaska while Dan Robbins consults. Intrada proudly releases album under their Excalibur brand of classic film score re-recordings. Allan Wilson conducts Royal Scottish National Orchestra, gives Rozsa fans one of the greats.

CD 1

01. Main Title And Narration

02. The Morgan Farm

03. The New Hired Hand

04. Oxhead Wood Mystery

05. Screams In The Night

06. Pete’s Strange Knowledge

07. The Barn

08. Nath Explores The Woods

09. Meg Asks Questions

10. Attack In The Woods

11. The Accusation And The Conspiracy

12. Search In The Woods

13. Swimming

14. Sunday Dinner

15. Pete Threatens Meg

16. Meeting In The Woods

17. Crossing The Stream

18. Pete Warns Teller

19. Prayer Sequence

20. Graduation Present

21. Meg Finds The Red House

22. Teller Shoots At Meg

23. Pete’s Grief

24. Meg’s Accident

25. Nath And Meg

26. Ellen Denounces Pete

27. Teller And Nath Fight

CD 2

01. Who Was Jeanie?

02. Ellen Goes To The Woods

03. Ellen’s Death

04. Pete’s Confession

05. Ride To The Red House And The Red House

06. Pete’s Death And End Title

Price: $19.99

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I don't like that Intrada didn't list the timing of each track or the overall time. They're still only charging $20 so what difference does it make?

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