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What score was treated with more disrespect: TPM or The Hobbit..?


Sandor
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Now that I finally got to hear the OST - the score Shore intended for The Hobbit - I feel it was fairly disrespectful to replace much of this masterful and profound production with music pretty much copy and posted from the original LOTR soundtracks.

The soundtrack is simply great and I wish it would have been preserved in the film.

Then I wonder about The Phantom Menace. We all know how Williams' score was chopped up and butchered for the final act.

But what if Lucas had taken a similar route Jackson took and had actually placed familiair music from ESB or ROTJ in TPM instead of Williams' newly written score...?

What if Darth Maul's appearance would suddenly be put to The Imperial March, completely ignoring Williams' new material for the scene...? Would that be something like the Nazgul music supporting an important scene involving Thorin in The Hobbit?

Well, at least The Hobbit got a proper official release.

So which score do you feel got the most disrespect in the editing room...?

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I must say while watching i neither noticed it much in THE HOBBIT or TPM (but i don't make a science out of listening to the soundtrack albums either, so).

The only movie were it did stand out to me were ATTACK OF THE CLONES and Goldsmith's LEGEND (european and dvd). The latter example is especially wretched - as it is customary for RS.

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Spider-Man 3 was also disrespected in this sense too. Young's score was butchered completely in SM3.

I don't get the fascination of screwing up someone's hard work. That being said, I didn't really notice it in the Hobbit.

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The Hobbit was not treated with disrespect! Doug Adams told us that all the themes taken from LOTR were used for good reasons! Why can't you believe him?!?!?!

I'm sure Jackson replaced Shore's King Kong score for "good reasons" as well.

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Considering that sections of JNH's Kong sounds like Shore, I would really prefer to hear what the latter originally intended.

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Considering that sections of JNH's Kong sounds like Shore, I would really prefer to hear what the latter originally intended.

I don't hear Shore in Howard's score, but then again to me Shore is dark and brooding. Everyone associates Lord Of The Rings with him yet it's the music that is most outside of his own style. Wasn't the whole ordeal that he wanted to do a more traditional one akin to Steiner's original?

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Considering that sections of JNH's Kong sounds like Shore, I would really prefer to hear what the latter originally intended.

I don't hear Shore in Howard's score, but then again to me Shore is dark and brooding. Everyone associates Lord Of The Rings with him yet it's the music that is most outside of his own style. Wasn't the whole ordeal that he wanted to do a more traditional one akin to Steiner's original?

LotR us not most out of his style. In fact, people seem to forget that LOTR is very much Shore, it's just a louder and more colorful expression of his sound. A lot of his previous scores shows LOTR's roots.

Although Shore used to be most well known for his brooding, that's not necessarily his characteristic style.

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No new music was recorded. There were no pickup sessions.

So..... the music just... appeared in thin air?

No, it was recorded along with the rest.

So basically sort of like what was speculated with War Horse, where there were takes for the album, and takes for the film, except with The Hobbit, its different compositions.

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Considering that sections of JNH's Kong sounds like Shore, I would really prefer to hear what the latter originally intended.

I don't hear Shore in Howard's score, but then again to me Shore is dark and brooding. Everyone associates Lord Of The Rings with him yet it's the music that is most outside of his own style. Wasn't the whole ordeal that he wanted to do a more traditional one akin to Steiner's original?

LotR us not most out of his style. In fact, people seem to forget that LOTR is very much Shore, it's just a louder and more colorful expression of his sound. A lot of his previous scores shows LOTR's roots.

Although Shore used to be most well known for his brooding, that's not necessarily his characteristic style.

I disagree.

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LotR us not most out of his style. In fact, people seem to forget that LOTR is very much Shore, it's just a louder and more colorful expression of his sound. A lot of his previous scores shows LOTR's roots.

It's Shore's idea of "epic". I imagine he was chosen because he could do horror. The filmmaking team wanted something specific and they found it. Shore naturally escalated his style into the larger than life LOTR sound we know.

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No new music was recorded. There were no pickup sessions.

So..... the music just... appeared in thin air?

No, it was recorded along with the rest.

So basically sort of like what was speculated with War Horse, where there were takes for the album, and takes for the film, except with The Hobbit, its different compositions.

So then, who knows what was really "intended" . If they has so much music they can;t use all of it, so they probably went with the ones they liked best for the film. Maybe all the film versions should be on the OST

At least it was mixed SUPER LOUD in the film

In TPM most cues are barely audible

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LotR us not most out of his style. In fact, people seem to forget that LOTR is very much Shore, it's just a louder and more colorful expression of his sound. A lot of his previous scores shows LOTR's roots.

It's Shore's idea of "epic". I imagine he was chosen because he could do horror. The filmmaking team wanted something specific and they found it. Shore naturally escalated his style into the larger than life LOTR sound we know.

Precisely. But it's not like the LotR sound came out of the blue. The films Shore had to do never really demanded such a larger than life soundscape. LotR was just Shore's opportunity to translate his stylistic devices to a bigger canvas. Listen to scores like Looking for Richard, Dogma and The Fly and you'll hear the roots of Shore's Middle-Earth.

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In TPM most cues are barely audible

I guess that's what happens when the sound designer is also the film editor- Ken Wannberg had to raise billy hell to get Ben Burtt to give JW's score any notice over Burtt's sound fx.

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