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Jurassic Park 20th Anniversary OST (Digital only release)


Sharkissimo
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It's a wonder we've gotten anything. How did he not prevent the releases of Amazing Stories, Hook, Jaws, the Home Alones, Family Plot, 1941 and Star Wars?

As Cinemasins would put it:

Because parsimonious publishing companies!

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The expanded Indy scores had issues with royalty payments, IIRC. There's a reason Raiders is basically complete (different orchestra), but Temple and Crusade only received almost exactly 45 and 30 minutes of new music respectively. They have to pay royalties in 15 minute increments.

Frustratingly, there's an easy 15 extra minutes of alternates/unreleased cues from Temple they really should've included ('Fortune and Glory', 'Pankot Palace Film Version', 'The Bridge'), but Lucasfilm is cheap. They obviously didn't think the set would sell as well as it did.

And Williams was behind the cuts to the Raiders re-release, including the godawful Desert Chase microedits.

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Why does "royalty issues" ONLY affect holy grail JW scores?

Why would ToD be different than Hook or Empire of the Sun? Even fucking Heartbeeps got a complete release

Whenever anything else is released it's complete and we don't hear about that. Even new scores are now being released complete like that 2 c.d. Giacchino score, LotR or whatever Zimmer composed

BUT when we ask why there's no Force Awakens 2 c.d. set it'll be because of re-use fees , royalties or whatever

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I don't buy this cost bullshit that only comes into play when it concerns JW's most popular scores

As all of suddenly fear of not making a profit is an issue when it doesn't apply to much less popular composer

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There's probably a hidden reason why these scores aren't released, and has nothing to do with JW blocking them.And I just don't buy the cost reasons anymore because that excuse is only dragged out for Star Wars, Harry Potter and Indiana Jones

It's probably be as stupid as the people who could do it have recordings for themselves and don't want to release it for everyone .A bit like the sessions trading game but on a producer's level

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To this day I still think all those guys working at FSM, LaLaLand have stuff like the SW Prequel recording sessions stashed away on their hard drives for personal listening so that's why nobody's in a hurry to release anything

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We just have to accept that we're never going to get the complete Indiana Jones or Star Wars prequel scores, or Return of the Jedi in good sound quality. Meanwhile, all the latest Zimmer and Giacchino scores will receive 17 deluxe reissues within a year of release.

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To this day I still think all those guys working at FSM, LaLaLand have stuff like the SW Prequel recording sessions stashed away on their hard drives for personal listening so that's why nobody's in a hurry to release anything

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I wonder... Had Williams scored a Star Trek film, would it have been given a complete score release (like all the other ones), or would his score have remained the only one with no deluxe edition?

He would have contractually insisted his microedits be preserved, with the only additions being a few source cues at the end. And some screensavers.

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There's probably a hidden reason why these scores aren't released, and has nothing to do with JW blocking them.And I just don't buy the cost reasons anymore because that excuse is only dragged out for Star Wars, Harry Potter and Indiana Jones

It's probably be as stupid as the people who could do it have recordings for themselves and don't want to release it for everyone .A bit like the sessions trading game but on a producer's level

LOL there isn't any conspiracy, KM. The point is exactly that: Indy, SW, Potter are all HUGE franchises, i.e. there is always A LOT of money to be made out of any product related and/or tied to it, not to mention an absurd queue of approvals to be made at various stages for anything. Really, imprint this in your brain: It's not Williams blocking anything--he doesn't have that power. Studios and film companies own the scores. It's their property and it's entirely up to them to decide what to do. Some of them prefer to involve the composers when it comes to release anything, mostly because there are relationships to take care of, but also because they think it's right to involve the creative owner of the intellectual property.

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I wonder... Had Williams scored a Star Trek film, would it have been given a complete score release (like all the other ones), or would his score have remained the only one with no deluxe edition?

He would have contractually insisted his microedits be preserved, with the only additions being a few source cues at the end. And some screensavers.

And dialogue versions.

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To this day I still think all those guys working at FSM, LaLaLand have stuff like the SW Prequel recording sessions stashed away on their hard drives for personal listening so that's why nobody's in a hurry to release anything

I honestly think this is true. Maybe not for the Star Wars prequels, but those guys surely have some cool scores that they have no immediate plans of releasing. Anyhoo, how about that Jurassic Park?

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"but also because they think it's right to involve the creative owner of the intellectual property."

Big studios seem highly selective when deciding when to involve the composer. For scores like Hook and Indiana Jones, they're like "ZOMG WE MUST INVOLVE THE COMPOSER TO MAINTAIN RELASHUNSHIP!" but for scores like 1941 and Empire of the Sun, they're like "WHO KAREZ?!"

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1941 and Empire of the Sun, good (great, even) as they are, are not as coveted as E.T., Star Wars, Indy, Hook, etc. It is interesting that those releases were comprehensive as all hell and basically perfect, as well as many other more obscure Williams scores. Meanwhile, the Star Wars Trilogy has entirely dubious sound quality through multiple reissues, Hook and the Indy set were slapped together and missing vital music (and ROTLA and TOD have defective audio transfers), Close Encounters hasn't even been in print for well over a decade (!), the prequels haven't been expanded, etc.

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1941 and Empire of the Sun, good (great, even) as they are, are not as coveted as E.T., Star Wars, Indy, Hook, etc. It is interesting that those releases were comprehensive as all hell and basically perfect, as well as many other more obscure Williams scores. Meanwhile, the Star Wars Trilogy has entirely dubious sound quality through multiple reissues, Hook and the Indy set were slapped together and missing vital music (and ROTLA and TOD have defective audio transfers), Close Encounters hasn't even been in print for well over a decade (!), the prequels haven't been expanded, etc.

They may be holding out so people will have the incentive to buy future releases of those scores because of the previously unreleased music, remastered sound, etc. Star Wars, Indy, etc. will always be big sellers while 1941 and Empire of the Sun don't have the same demand and popularity, which may be one reason why those are comprehensive and nearly perfect.

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Naturally.

It would be pointless to remaster a soundtrack that's going to have a low return for their investment. With Stars Wars, Indy, etc., it's a safe investment.

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Yeah! Screw these soundtrack producers!

Death to MV Gerhardt, Michael M, Robert Townson, Neil S Bulk!

All I said was that these guys probably have cool, ultra-rare stuff on their hard drives, I never said I hate them for it. In fact, I agree with what E.T. said:

We are in a position to demand nothing.

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"but also because they think it's right to involve the creative owner of the intellectual property."

Big studios seem highly selective when deciding when to involve the composer. For scores like Hook and Indiana Jones, they're like "ZOMG WE MUST INVOLVE THE COMPOSER TO MAINTAIN RELASHUNSHIP!" but for scores like 1941 and Empire of the Sun, they're like "WHO KAREZ?!"

Well then there are releases like Superman that do not conform to that rule. It has been released in the most comprehensive form and is one of JWs big scores from the golden age. But then again Close Encounters E.T. and Indy scores are examples of equally big titles that have never been done as thoroughly mainly because JW has been involved and doesn't feel people should hear every note. Makes you wonder why Superman is such an exception.

John Williams seems to be one those composers who doesn't necessarily want to release all of his stuff even though people would certainly want to produce the most comprehensive releases possible and fans would dearly love to own their favourite soundtracks in their entirety. Many other composers would jump at the chance to release their music in complete form. E.g. Howard Shore is doing it himself now with his Howe label.

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It's always interesting to observe how different the view on some "hot topics" can be depending on which angle you choose to like... For the sake of mind's sanity, let's check how many JW scores have been released (expanded or just reissued) throughout the last 10-15 years:

None But the Brave (FSM - Complete)
John Goldfarb, Please Come Home! (FSM - Complete)
How to Steal a Million (Intrada - Complete Film Score + OST reissue)
Not With My Wife, You Don't! (FSM - Complete Film Score + OST reissue - released separately)
Penelope (FSM - Complete Film Score + OST reissue)
A Guide for the Married Man (FSM - Complete)
Fitzwilly (Music Box - Complete film score + OST reissue)
Heidi (Quartet - OST expanded + original tracks)
Goodbye, Mr. Chips (FSM - Complete)
Fiddler on the Roof (EMI - Extended OST reissue)
The Poseidon Adventure (LLL - Complete)
Images (Prometheus - Academy Promo reissue)
The Long Goodbye (Quartet - Complete)
The Man Who Loved Cat Dancing (FSM - Complete)
The Paper Chase (FSM - Complete - maybe a few cues missing)
Cinderella Liberty (Intrada - OST reissue -- original film tracks available as music-only track on Fox DVD)
Conrack (FSM - three cues)
The Towering Inferno (FSM - Complete film score + WB digital only OST reissue)
Jaws (Decca - Complete original film tracks)
Family Plot (Varèse - Complete)
The Missouri Breaks (Kritzerland - Complete film score + OST reissue)
Midway (Varèse - Re-recording + Complete film tracks)
Black Sunday (FSM - Complete film score)
Star Wars (RCA/Sony - Complete film score)
Close Encounters of the Third Kind (Arista/Sony - Semi-complete score)
The Fury (Varèse - original film recording + OST reissue -- remastered and re-released by LLL with additional unreleased cues)
Superman (Rhino - Complete film score -- remastered and re-relased by FSM with additional unreleased cues)
1941 (LLL - Complete film score + OST reissue)
The Empire Strikes Back (RCA/Sony - Complete film score)
Raiders of the Lost Ark (DCC - Expanded OST -- re-released by Concord with additional unreleased cues/ incorrect pitch)
Heartbeeps (Varèse - Complete Film Score)
E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial (MCA - Expanded OST, re-released in 2002 with more unreleased cues)
Monsignor (Intrada - OST reissue, aka virtually the complete score)
Return of the Jedi (RCA/Sony - Complete Film Score)
Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (Concord - Expanded OST/incorrect pitch)
Amazing Stories (Intrada -- 2 complete tv scores)
SpaceCamp (Intrada - OST re-release)
The Witches of Eastwick (Perseverance - OST reissue)
Empire of the Sun (LLL - Complete film score)
The Accidental Tourist (FSM - OST reissue)
Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (Concord - OST expanded)
Home Alone (LLL - Complete film score)
Hook (LLL - OST extended on 2 CD)
Home Alone 2: Lost in New York (Varèse - Complete film score -- re-released by LLL)
Jurassic Park (Geffen - OST expanded)
Rosewood (LLL - Complete film score + OST reissue)
Maybe I forgot something, but there you have it.
Yes, there are still things that need to be properly expanded and released in our own preferred archival presentation i.e. complete film score + OST reissue like Dracula, Jaws 2, Eiger Sanction, Earthquake and most of his 1990s and early 00s output. Also, there are still things that remain completely unreleased, like some of his earlier 1960s scores. But just look at how much have been released in the last 15 years. I agree some key titles (SW trilogy, Jaws, E.T.) would benefit from a total new remaster and assembly and that there is room for improvement on the presentation of others (Indy, Hook), but all those titles will be very likely released again in some form, because they're big hot properties. It's only a matter of time. In the meantime there is plenty (and I mean PLENTY) of JW music to enjoy, including stuff I really never thought I would see released, like Amazing Stories.
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I think the problem is more that when a expansion is added to that very comprehensive list, there's an expectation that it will be the last word for that score.

In the case of Indy, Jurassic and Hook (to some extent), each of them has flaws which make a further, more definitive release in the future required, to bring them up to the standard of other releases.

Hook can be debated I guess, as the problem wasn't from lack of trying by the producers (missing elements, etc), but the first two are victims of the producer handling it in the wrong way, and Williams being given absolute leeway in what's held back. Given what LLL were able to do with Hook/1941/Empire/Rosewood, they seem to be more instrumental in influencing Williams to present the material chronologically.

I can see a shitstorm coming with LLL's potential Potter expansions. With a nearly perfect boot of the first two, something is going to be left off, or arranged by Williams, or the editor will do a crossfade at the wrong point. I wish that just for once, we get the score how it was recorded.

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No doubt that we have been getting an amazing amount of unreleased scores and expanded releases from JW in the past 15 to 20 years, which is a fantastic thing as something a bit more obscure like Black Sunday or Bachelor Flat seemed to have very remote chance of ever surfacing and now we have those. I know you are trying to put things in perspective Maurizio but it cannot be denied that it is a crying shame Williams's most iconic scores have yet to receive such comprehensive treatment as many of the specialty labels have given to many lesser and smaller scores of his.

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I know you are trying to put things in perspective Maurizio but it cannot be denied that it is a crying shame Williams's most iconic scores have yet to receive such comprehensive treatment as many of the specialty labels have given to many lesser and smaller scores of his.

I don't question this aspect, Incanus. Some of his most popular works surely can be improved in terms of presentation and would only benefit from that. I firmly believe that every piece of Williams' music is worth to be archived and preserved on disc (or other digital support) for posterity. However, we all know that his most popular scores are also the ones tied to franchises very much in control of their owners, who tend to be very protective of their properties and also seem to think it's essential to involve JW when it comes to release anything. However, I'm confident enough that we'll see future releases of Indy, Star Wars, Harry Potter, E.T. likely more oriented to the current preferred format for film score collectors.

Anyway, I'm also sure enough that even the most comprehensive release would have some people whining for minutiae like tracks separation, crossfades, mastering, loudness, film versions vs. alternates, missing inserts, etc etc etc. Soundtrack collectors seem to be very hard to please folks and, more often than not, they tend to focus on such tiny aspects instead of simply enjoying the music. I don't want to sound excessively nostalgic, but I'm old enough to remember the times when you just had the OST and you played it over and over and let yourself be immersed in the music without thinking too much about what was missing. I too had (and still have!) my share of gnawing thoughts about missing cues... I remember I wanted to have the "Helicopter Rescue" cue from Superman and I've been always disappointed that it wasn't included on the OST... but the sheer joy of playing that double-LP was much stronger and joyful than any thoughts of disappointment.

In short, I think we have been already very lucky in terms of how much JW music has been released over the years. We also had expanded releases much before than when it became the norm (SW Anthology in 1993, Raiders expanded in 1995). People complaining saying "it's not what I wanted" usually reduce to guys obsessing over some 15-seconds transitional fanfare, or a missing percussion overlay. We all have our own personal anal-retentive obsessions when it comes to these things and there's nothing wrong in expressing our own disappointment when a product doesn't fulfill our own expectations. But let's not miss the forest for the trees. As I said, we have plenty of JW goodies to enjoy and to listen to again and again.

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Agreed. These big franchise scores are more closely guarded by there owners because of the intrinsic value they are deemed to have because they have Star Wars, Harry Potter and Indiana Jones slapped on them. Same goes for titles like E.T. and Jaws, famous studio tent pole titles.

Though it can be done though, if they will is there. Paramount's desire to have their Star Trek scores re-released in expanded/complete form is an example. All of them came out in just a couple of years, even though the rights were held by several labels.

An active interest from those who own the rights/tapes or the composer makes things a lot easier I guess. And John Williams doesn't really seem to be all that interested in releasing his back catalog.

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  • 1 year later...

Well, nearly 3 years later and this still hasn't been released outside the US for download. So the only way for me to obtain this legally is to relocate to the US? Or hope that Intrada gets to release it on a physical CD someday...

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1 hour ago, JTWfan77 said:

Well, nearly 3 years later and this still hasn't been released outside the US for download. So the only way for me to obtain this legally is to relocate to the US? Or hope that Intrada gets to release it on a physical CD someday...

 

They figured only Americans would be interested in hearing it.

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2 hours ago, JTWfan77 said:

Well, nearly 3 years later and this still hasn't been released outside the US for download.

 

That's not true. This is available for download in Europe on Qobuz, both in CD quality and in high res, no less. I haven't looked any further than that, but I'm confident it's available in other parts of the world, on other platforms, etc.

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