Jump to content

Missouri Breaks 2CD Complete Score (SOLD OUT in 72 hours!)


Jay
 Share

Recommended Posts

Note: The original main post accidentally got deleted. Woops.

2wqsf35.jpg

Kritzerland is very proud to present a 2-CD set – the world premiere release of the original film tracks, along with a brand new mastering of the original LP re-recording of:

THE MISSOURI BREAKS

Music Composed and Conducted by John Williams

Well, it seemed like a good idea: Pair two superstars coming off hugely successful films – Marlon Brando, whose last two films had been The Godfather and Last Tango in Paris, and Jack Nicholson, coming off Chinatown and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest – add in screenwriter Thomas McGuane, a well-respected novelist turned screenwriter, with Rancho Deluxe and 92 in the Shade (based on his novel) to his credit, and top it off with the great director Arthur Penn, who’d made the brilliant The Miracle Worker, Bonnie and Clyde and Little Big Man. Then hire some of the best character actors working then – Harry Dean Stanton, John McLiam, Randy Quaid, Frederic Forrest, and a fetching, strong-minded leading lady, Kathleen Lloyd and how could it fail?

But fail it did, with both critics and audiences. But thanks to TV and home video, people have come to embrace the pleasures of the film. It looks great, thanks to the beautiful photography of Michael Butler, but even more importantly it has a musical score that just brings the whole thing alive, thanks to the great John Williams.

Williams had already done big, brash, outdoorsy Americana before with The Reivers and The Cowboys. But The Missouri Breaks wasn’t big and brash, and so required a different kind of score – smaller in scale, but one that would capture the characters and the drama as well as the period and the feel of the film. And, of course, Williams delivered a perfect score (albeit atypical for him during this period), mostly composed for guitars, harmonica, percussion, and a handful of other instruments. Williams never wants for coming up with an instantly memorable and beautiful theme and The Missouri Breaks has a beauty in its love theme – never overused, always right. His main title music sets the mood with tense bass notes, and off-kilter harmonica and guitar – it’s wonderfully evocative and haunting. There are up-tempo infectious cues and cues for Brando that are really off-kilter. It’s Williams doing what he did (and still does) better than anyone, and it’s a score that’s completely unique to him.

There was an LP release at the time of the film – that was a re-recording, and Williams, as he did frequently, arranged the music differently than the film, to work as a cohesive thirty-six minute album. That LP release was issued on CD, first by Ryko, who added three bonus tracks from the original film cues – the first time those had been heard outside the film (although, interestingly, those three cues contained no music that wasn’t in the re-recording) – and then by Varese Sarabande, which was a virtual clone of the Ryko CD.

For this CD release, we are really pleased to present all of the original film tracks for the very first time – their world premiere release – from the original superb-sounding session masters. It’s leaner and meaner than the re-recording, and a completely different listening experience. A handful of cues went unused in the film itself, but we’ve included everything for this release. We also are including the original LP presentation but we’ve gone back to the original album masters so we could be at the original source for the best possible sound. So, here, at long last, is the complete original soundtrack cues for The Missouri Breaks. They’ve been a long time coming, but we hope you’ll find they’ve been worth the wait.

THE MISSOURI BREAKS is limited to 1200 copies only. The 2-CD set is priced at $19.98, plus shipping.

CD will ship the second week of August, but preorders placed at Kritzerland usually ship one to five weeks early (we’ve been averaging four weeks).



Disc 1 | THE ORIGINAL SCORE TRACKS
01 The Missouri Breaks (Main Title)
02 Logan’s Entrance
03 Logan and Calvin Talk (Unused)
04 The Train Robbery
05 After the Trial/The Hanging Foreman/Riding the Horse
06 Boys Will Play
07 Clayton at the Wake (Unused)
08 Crossing the River
09 Clayton’s Binoculars
10 Logan and Jane
11 The Cabbage Patch
12 The Mounties Attack/Lee Chases Tod
13 The Drowning of Tod
14 News of Tod
15 The Rustling Sequence
16 Si and Cary
17 Calvin
18 End Titles

Bonus tracks
19 Unused Cue 1-3
20 Organ Cue 4-2
21 Banjo and Harmonica Cue 11-3
22 Fiddle Cue 11-3A
23 Harmonica Cue 13-2


Disc 2 | THE ORIGINAL ALBUM RE-RECORDING
01 The Missouri Breaks (Main Title)
02 Arrival of the Rustlers
03 Love Theme from The Missouri Breaks
04 The Train Robbery
05 Bizarre Wake
06 Celebration
07 Confrontation
08 Love Theme (Reprise)
09 Crossing the Missouri
10 The Chase
11 Remembrances
12 The Horse Rustlers
13 Love Theme (End Title)



http://www.kritzerland.com/mo_breaks.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You all know what I think about expanded releases, so I'm not going to repeat it, but yeah -- underrated score that isn't often talked about. If memory serves, there isn't a lot of interesting music that was left off the original release, mostly meandering suspense music and the like. But it's been a while since I saw the film. So I'm curious if this will satisfy even those who always crave C&C.Time will tell.

At this point, I would really, really like to see a previously unreleased Williams score, not just endless expansions. When was the last time we got that?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As pointed out in the main post, the original LP was a re-recording and only a few of the real film tracks were added to the Rykodisc/Varese CD, so this will be a premiere of most of the original film tracks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As pointed out in the main post, the original album was mostly a re-recording, so this will be a premiere of most of the original film tracks.

That's true. So for those who crave that, it will obviously have that appeal in itself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I always liked this but I grew up with it between blockbusters.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another thing to consider is that his operation is much smaller than the other independent labels, he likely cannot afford to over press releases and have them sit around.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But there's demand for them. If something sells out overnight you could have sold more. I remember him saying something along the lines of seeing the profits immediately instead of over time so he can fund other releases.

Rain Man was Perseverance, Jay, and was limited to 2,000.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know, I meant to type Thelma and Louise.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Years ago I heard John Williams in a BBC radio interview state that he used just six musicians on the score for this movie! I taped the interview off the radio at the time but I'll be damned if I remember what I did with the thing. In the same interview (which I guess must have been an archival recording from the 70's) he also talked about The Towering Inferno, Fiddler on the Roof and Jaws, amongst others.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Years ago I heard John Williams in a BBC radio interview state that he used just six musicians on the score for this movie! I taped the interview off the radio at the time but I'll be damned if I remember what I did with the thing. In the same interview (which I guess must have been an archival recording from the 70's) he also talked about The Towering Inferno, Fiddler on the Roof and Jaws, amongst others.

Six? Sounds to me like there's a bit more than that. Could be overdubs, of course.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, were sure getting treated to expanded obscure Williams score this year.

I'll get this for sure too

Link to comment
Share on other sites

At this point, I would really, really like to see a previously unreleased Williams score, not just endless expansions. When was the last time we got that?

Nightwatch from FSM? That was December 2011, but it feels to me like a few weeks ago^^

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Re-recordings are not that appealing to me, unless there's any reason to think one is superior to the one we currently have. But still cool that this is getting released. And the exchange Jason quoted is hilarious--proof of the impact fanboards and discussions can have on these things!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Re-recordings are not that appealing to me, unless there's any reason to think one is superior to the one we currently have. But still cool that this is getting released. And the exchange Jason quoted is hilarious--proof of the impact fanboards and discussions can have on these things!

Only re-recording mentioned in this thread is the original Missouri Break album, which was not comprised of the original score tracks but was a re-recorded album much like the original OST of Jaws or The Fury. In my opinion both were excellent presentations of their respective scores, which of course does not mean that the original score were not be desirable when they came out. :)

Actually I love having the original score and the re-recorded OST album, two different interpretations of the same music.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Years ago I heard John Williams in a BBC radio interview state that he used just six musicians on the score for this movie! I taped the interview off the radio at the time but I'll be damned if I remember what I did with the thing. In the same interview (which I guess must have been an archival recording from the 70's) he also talked about The Towering Inferno, Fiddler on the Roof and Jaws, amongst others.

Six? Sounds to me like there's a bit more than that. Could be overdubs, of course.

He probably meant that there were only six instrumentalists playing, but of course some of them played more than one instrument (like the guitarist playing banjo or mandolin as well).

If I remember well, JW himself played the keyboard parts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Re-recordings are not that appealing to me, unless there's any reason to think one is superior to the one we currently have. But still cool that this is getting released. And the exchange Jason quoted is hilarious--proof of the impact fanboards and discussions can have on these things!

Only re-recording mentioned in this thread is the original Missouri Break album, which was not comprised of the original score tracks but was a re-recorded album much like the original OST of Jaws or The Fury. In my opinion both were excellent presentations of their respective scores, which of course does not mean that the original score were not be desirable when they came out. :)

Actually I love having the original score and the re-recorded OST album, two different interpretations of the same music.

I should have been more clear--I don't care to own two different recordings of the same work unless they are significantly different, regardless of which one was used in the film.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Years ago I heard John Williams in a BBC radio interview state that he used just six musicians on the score for this movie! I taped the interview off the radio at the time but I'll be damned if I remember what I did with the thing. In the same interview (which I guess must have been an archival recording from the 70's) he also talked about The Towering Inferno, Fiddler on the Roof and Jaws, amongst others.

I heard that interview, too, Omen. It was in 1976, just before "Midway" was released (whish he also talked about, btw). The interview was for a BBC Radio 2 programme callrd "Starsound". It was a good interview, but then, everything about JW was good, when one was aged ----!

I wonder if the new release will name the players?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for that extra information, Richard - I had often wondered what the source of that original interview was. The version I heard was on a BBC Radio 2 programme called Music By that aired about 20 years ago. I could tell that they were not interviewing Williams live, but chopping up bits and pieces of the interview interspersed with selections from his scores. The other programmes in the series were good too; I remember other interviews that featured Henry Mancini, John Barry, Johnny Dankworth, George Fenton, Elmer Bernstein, Jerry Goldsmith and even Bronsilau Kaper, who talked about his score to Them! In those pre-internet days, hearing those legendary composers speak 'for the first time' was like manna from heaven!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Bruce Kimmel posted on FSM that Kritzerland next release will be MISSOURI BREAKS by our true hero!

From what he says, it seems it'll be a 2 CD set!

FSM member Josh Mitchel wrote: "'70s western comedy/drama? It's gotta be Missouri Breaks (the original film recordings). Seven weeks from licensing deal to announcement = most impressive".

Kimmel wrote a few comments later that:

"Wouldn't that be something? I know I'd be dancing a western jig - all the original film tracks for the first time and the LP re-recording remastered from the original album masters (I didn't care for the Ryko EQ and decided to go back to the source). The original film tracks are great - leaner and meaner but just wonderful-sounding. I would advise everyone to be here first thing Monday morning smile.gif

And yes, we've upped the number a little but given the previous releases and that it's not, you know, one of those 80s or 90s things, I was not comfortable upping it much because I think most of us have learned the hard way that once you hit a certain number people then think they can wait until it's down to its final fifty to order - we're not quite set up to do that, and while some titles still sell out, many don't, including some surprising ones. Even Breakheart Pass at 1000 copies took a few days, which was really surprising to me. This one won't be around long and we need a sellout every now and then.

I'm not sure how to calculate because Williams rearranged a lot of the album tracks to play as cohesively as possible, and therefore they don't always resemble what's in the film. I can say there's probably ten more minutes of music, maybe a bit more, a couple of unused cues, and some bonus stuff. I suspect that disc one will run an hour but can't swear to that yet. The original LP was about thirty-seven minutes.

Listening to the complete score in the original tracks is a whole different deal and a pretty amazing one"
.

Source: http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?forumID=1&pageID=18&threadID=96711&archive=0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh no poor Kriterzland, a CD took a few days to sell out. The agony.

My guess is 2,000 copies.

My guess is you're wrong. My guess is that you've kind of made several snarky comments in this thread. So, here's the deal - when it's your money that's at risk and your company YOU can press 2,000 and what you will find on a score that's been out twice before unlimited, no matter what we're doing with it, is that you'll sell about seven hundred out the door and you will sit on the rest for a very long time, while people relax and decide to buy it when its down to its final 100. We've done what we've done and it will sell out when it sells out, but people will order and not sit on their butt cheeks, and that, I'm afraid, is what we need to have happen. So, we won't be having the "agony." Monday morning, for those who are wondering when. :)

I don't know much about this forum but having just read the Kritzerland thread, I did enjoy all the personal jabs - I kind of live for them :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Monday morning, for those who are wondering when. :)

Thanks for the information! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

$12.75 to Portugal for a single disc release :(

Guess that's way I've always ordered their discs from Intrada.

I'll probably combine it with something else from SAE. (although their shipping is high too)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good timing as I was going to order something tomorrow from SAE anyway. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Someone please tell me what Intrada is charging for shipping to Europe, I'm genuinely curious. Because we are charging exactly what the post office is charging - we're not even adding on the cost of the box, which is not free you know. So, exactly how would Intrada be charging less unless they're losing money on every sale. I find it hard to believe, frankly. Certainly we're not in a position to lose money on every sale.



$12.75 to Portugal for a single disc release :(

Guess that's way I've always ordered their discs from Intrada.

Really? Really? That's why you've always ordered our discs from Intrada because you're saving so much money on postage? News alert for you: Intrada is charging MORE than we are - 13.00 for a single disc. Oops. I knew it was horse manure. Isn't that good news? Now you can order through us with complete comfort.



Crocodile, I am always happy to hold copies if anyone needs time to pay - all you have to do is drop me an e-mail at kritzerland at gmail dot com.



$12.75 to Portugal for a single disc release :(

Guess that's way I've always ordered their discs from Intrada.

I'll probably combine it with something else from SAE. (although their shipping is high too)

Unless I'm misremembering we can ship two CDs for the one postage cost - it goes up with three CDs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh my, no need to get upset. I'm planning on getting this new release directly from you. I always try to get CD from the actual label, and if memory serves, I only have on disc from your label. At the time I decided to go with Intrada, and as I said it had to do with the shipping charges. I believe you try to have the best prices you can, but from my own standpoint, your international page could provide more info (like that you can ship two CDs for the one postage cost, which would me a whole lot diference).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

$12.75 to Portugal for a single disc release :(

Guess that's way I've always ordered their discs from Intrada.

I'll probably combine it with something else from SAE. (although their shipping is high too)

Unless I'm misremembering we can ship two CDs for the one postage cost - it goes up with three CDs.

I understand, but I was going to buy a Twilight Time Bluray along with it. ;)

Thank you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2wqsf35.jpg

Kritzerland is very proud to present a 2-CD set – the world premiere release of the original film tracks, along with a brand new mastering of the original LP re-recording of:

THE MISSOURI BREAKS
Music Composed and Conducted by John Williams
Well, it seemed like a good idea: Pair two superstars coming off hugely successful films – Marlon Brando, whose last two films had been The Godfather and Last Tango in Paris, and Jack Nicholson, coming off Chinatown and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest – add in screenwriter Thomas McGuane, a well-respected novelist turned screenwriter, with Rancho Deluxe and 92 in the Shade (based on his novel) to his credit, and top it off with the great director Arthur Penn, who’d made the brilliant The Miracle Worker, Bonnie and Clyde and Little Big Man. Then hire some of the best character actors working then – Harry Dean Stanton, John McLiam, Randy Quaid, Frederic Forrest, and a fetching, strong-minded leading lady, Kathleen Lloyd and how could it fail?
But fail it did, with both critics and audiences. But thanks to TV and home video, people have come to embrace the pleasures of the film. It looks great, thanks to the beautiful photography of Michael Butler, but even more importantly it has a musical score that just brings the whole thing alive, thanks to the great John Williams.
Williams had already done big, brash, outdoorsy Americana before with The Reivers and The Cowboys. But The Missouri Breaks wasn’t big and brash, and so required a different kind of score – smaller in scale, but one that would capture the characters and the drama as well as the period and the feel of the film. And, of course, Williams delivered a perfect score (albeit atypical for him during this period), mostly composed for guitars, harmonica, percussion, and a handful of other instruments. Williams never wants for coming up with an instantly memorable and beautiful theme and The Missouri Breaks has a beauty in its love theme – never overused, always right. His main title music sets the mood with tense bass notes, and off-kilter harmonica and guitar – it’s wonderfully evocative and haunting. There are up-tempo infectious cues and cues for Brando that are really off-kilter. It’s Williams doing what he did (and still does) better than anyone, and it’s a score that’s completely unique to him.
There was an LP release at the time of the film – that was a re-recording, and Williams, as he did frequently, arranged the music differently than the film, to work as a cohesive thirty-six minute album. That LP release was issued on CD, first by Ryko, who added three bonus tracks from the original film cues – the first time those had been heard outside the film (although, interestingly, those three cues contained no music that wasn’t in the re-recording) – and then by Varese Sarabande, which was a virtual clone of the Ryko CD.
For this CD release, we are really pleased to present all of the original film tracks for the very first time – their world premiere release – from the original superb-sounding session masters. It’s leaner and meaner than the re-recording, and a completely different listening experience. A handful of cues went unused in the film itself, but we’ve included everything for this release. We also are including the original LP presentation but we’ve gone back to the original album masters so we could be at the original source for the best possible sound. So, here, at long last, is the complete original soundtrack cues for The Missouri Breaks. They’ve been a long time coming, but we hope you’ll find they’ve been worth the wait.
THE MISSOURI BREAKS is limited to 1200 copies only. The 2-CD set is priced at $19.98, plus shipping.
CD will ship the second week of August, but preorders placed at Kritzerland usually ship one to five weeks early (we’ve been averaging four weeks).
Disc 1 | THE ORIGINAL SCORE TRACKS
01 The Missouri Breaks (Main Title)
02 Logan’s Entrance
03 Logan and Calvin Talk (Unused)
04 The Train Robbery
05 After the Trial/The Hanging Foreman/Riding the Horse
06 Boys Will Play
07 Clayton at the Wake (Unused)
08 Crossing the River
09 Clayton’s Binoculars
10 Logan and Jane
11 The Cabbage Patch
12 The Mounties Attack/Lee Chases Tod
13 The Drowning of Tod
14 News of Tod
15 The Rustling Sequence
16 Si and Cary
17 Calvin
18 End Titles
Bonus tracks
19 Unused Cue 1-3
20 Organ Cue 4-2
21 Banjo and Harmonica Cue 11-3
22 Fiddle Cue 11-3A
23 Harmonica Cue 13-2
Disc 2 | THE ORIGINAL ALBUM RE-RECORDING
01 The Missouri Breaks (Main Title)
02 Arrival of the Rustlers
03 Love Theme from The Missouri Breaks
04 The Train Robbery
05 Bizarre Wake
06 Celebration
07 Confrontation
08 Love Theme (Reprise)
09 Crossing the Missouri
10 The Chase
11 Remembrances
12 The Horse Rustlers
13 Love Theme (End Title)


http://www.kritzerland.com/mo_breaks.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines.