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Check out this great article with lots of pictures of James Horner's studio   http://jameshorner-filmmusic.com/visit-studio-james-horner/

Very important historical document: https://ia601500.us.archive.org/11/items/calauem_000217/calauem_000217_access.HD.mp4   &#

Just a bump in remembrance of this great man. I listen to his music every day one way or another and he is dearly missed. Thank you.

Whaaaaaaat?! (from Filmtracks)

Listen to this NPR interview with Antoine Fuqua about "Southpaw" (audio will be available at around 7PM Eastern Time): http://www.npr.org/2015/07/17/423899444/in-portrait-of-a-boxer-fuqua-takes-the-action-outside-the-ring

Towards the end he's asked about James Horner, who he says composed the score to Southpaw for free. Then he mentions that he recently received the score for "The Magnificent Seven" which Horner composed from the script.

Is this the first anyone has heard of this?

http://www.filmtracks.com/scoreboard/forum.cgi?read=3028

Could this be the fourth project that was being mentioned in Jay's post?

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Whaaaaaaat?! (from Filmtracks)

Listen to this NPR interview with Antoine Fuqua about "Southpaw" (audio will be available at around 7PM Eastern Time): http://www.npr.org/2015/07/17/423899444/in-portrait-of-a-boxer-fuqua-takes-the-action-outside-the-ring

Towards the end he's asked about James Horner, who he says composed the score to Southpaw for free. Then he mentions that he recently received the score for "The Magnificent Seven" which Horner composed from the script.

Is this the first anyone has heard of this?

http://www.filmtracks.com/scoreboard/forum.cgi?read=3028

Could this be the fourth project that was being mentioned in Jay's post?

Wow! I wonder how much he wrote...I admit I'm a little skeptical and feel like he might be exaggerating there. Like it's more a suite of themes, but even that would be something. Either way, seems like Fuqua would be keen to somehow use whatever material Horner wrote in his honor. He speaks so highly of him in that interview.

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Whaaaaaaat?! (from Filmtracks)

Listen to this NPR interview with Antoine Fuqua about "Southpaw" (audio will be available at around 7PM Eastern Time): http://www.npr.org/2015/07/17/423899444/in-portrait-of-a-boxer-fuqua-takes-the-action-outside-the-ring

Towards the end he's asked about James Horner, who he says composed the score to Southpaw for free. Then he mentions that he recently received the score for "The Magnificent Seven" which Horner composed from the script.

Is this the first anyone has heard of this?

http://www.filmtracks.com/scoreboard/forum.cgi?read=3028

Could this be the fourth project that was being mentioned in Jay's post?

Wow! I wonder how much he wrote...I admit I'm a little skeptical and feel like he might be exaggerating there. Like it's more a suite of themes, but even that would be something. Either way, seems like Fuqua would be keen to somehow use whatever material Horner wrote in his honor. He speaks so highly of him in that interview.

Probably some demo themes/motifs that he mocked up and shipped to Fuqua.

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From the sounds of it, Horner seemed to have written more than a demo. Fuqua mentioned that Horner's music team brought the score to him in Baton Rouge, so it could be a full piano sketch of the score. And likely mock-ups of the main themes.

A very interesting development indeed.

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People talk a lot in interviews. It would be a rather peculiar act: writing a complete score without a movie at hand - no timings, no nothing - and then shipping your written 1000-page score to a director who by all accounts neither reads nor plays music. I say it's urban legend and Horner probably sent him something that could be the thematic germ of a heavily doctored score in a year or so.

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People talk a lot in interviews. It would be a rather peculiar act: writing a complete score without a movie at hand - no timings, no nothing - and then shipping your written 1000-page score to a director who by all accounts neither reads nor plays music. I say it's urban legend and Horner probably sent him something that could be the thematic germ of a heavily doctored score in a year or so.

I listened to the NPR interview with Fuqua... it definitely doesn't sound like Horner just wrote a theme.

http://n.pr/1Gr8IsG

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People talk a lot in interviews. It would be a rather peculiar act: writing a complete score without a movie at hand - no timings, no nothing - and then shipping your written 1000-page score to a director who by all accounts neither reads nor plays music. I say it's urban legend and Horner probably sent him something that could be the thematic germ of a heavily doctored score in a year or so.

We could be wrong on this—and I confess, I haven't listened to that interview yet—but I'm leaning more in this direction myself. Stories like this do tend to proliferate after the death of artists who were commissioned for, or are in the midst of, writing a new work. Again, that's not to say there might not be something to this . . . but it would very much surprise me (and, I'll admit, delight me) if this turned out to be more than a simple sketch or two of ideas Horner was thinking on during the earliest stages of the creative process.

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  • 1 month later...

Check out the immortal Emil Richards doing his thing! Really cool.

Back when he still did. Tidbit: in FSM he once told how Horner became pricklish when Richards wouldn't lend him strange ethnic instruments (without Richards playing them, that is) and never called him again. This behaviour seems quite frequent, thinking how he ousted Shawn Murphy from his merry gang. Would be interesting to hear why he may have acted this way.

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Horner has always been notorious in the industry for being one of the most difficult persons to work with.

This is true - frequent stories of odd behavior. It seems like a recurring theme was brilliance, ego, shyness, and awkwardness. I think in retrospect with his tragic passing, pieces take on a bit more clarity in who he was but there are a few stories of rages in front of the orchestra, firing sections, and diva behavior from a very young age. A friend of mine knew him in high school and Horner was convinced from then that he would be a great composer and told everyone about it. It turns out he was right but that isn't an endearing quality.

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Kitchen psychology tells me that he may have been too sheltered in his wunderkind tower and also that the mere fact of having to musically dress up so many inferior commerce products that ultimately ill-helped his reputation as brilliant talent - even if there were remarkable musical pieces in scores like PAGEMASTER or LAND BEFORE TIME, hardly anyone besides film music fans really took notice.

So i guess he probably was - or felt - very isolated in his profession (compared to pragmatists like Goldsmith, who may have been grouchy but never antagonized people like that, as far as i'm aware).

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I think a more constructive way to think about it is he had personality quirks/flaws that rubbed people the wrong way. These seem petty in context of the loss. During the grind and pressure on a production, the mundane annoyances and tiffs take on too much importance but are quickly forgotten given the significance of the loss.

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He's hardly the only composer to have such stories circulate about him, even though they may be more plentiful for him than others. It's a good bet that any field where people are involved (so... everything) will yield instances and rumors of difficult personalities. Not a big deal, really, even if it's habitual and genuinely obnoxious. Easy to just let it go.

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He insinuated over several interviews that he liked the more mysterious/impressionist parts but not the main theme (read: the Williams-inspired march approach). He did go on praising ALIEN in the same interview though and given his broad romantic approach on practically every big adventure movie he did we can only surmise that James Horner just wasn't a big fan of marches in these kind of movies but dug the strange, ethereal textures by Goldsmith.

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