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Star Wars is better than everything


Jay

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39 minutes ago, Brock Lovett said:

I like the CGI. The original ESB has probably the lamest jump cut to the Falcon landing on Cloud City while the SE adds these amazing shots of it approaching through the city. And those corridors in Cloud City were just the same ones photographed from a couple angles like the starship Enterprise. Looks like the "city" is 20 feet of plain white hallways.

 

Models on wire in the original SW ending had some really rough shots of "dogfights" that I'm sure were always embarrassing for Lucas. The replacement shots are still some of ILM's best work.

 

The improvement to Cloud City is indeed substantial: Kershner even signed-off on those changes, and they reflect what he and Lucas always wanted - look at the McQuarrie illustrations of the Cloud City interiors, which do feature views to the outside. Again, in the name of historical preservation I think its imperative to have the original version in true HD or UHD, but I do like the additions here. The additions - in a similar vein - to Mos Eisley I'm more on the fence on: they achieve a similar purpose of opening up the scale (so does a revised - and much improved - shot of the exterior of Ben's hovel) but they don't look quite as good.

 

I also think the space battle is improved, as well. Again, I want to have the original version available. There are other changes like changing the Emperor in Episode V to Ian McDiarmid, and some other changes I like.

 

But, ultimately, I look at the Special Editions in terms of what Lucas hoped to achieve, and one the things he hoped to achieve is to make all the entries "fit" together, and in that sense the additions failed at the purpose they were made for: if anything, they only highlight the differences by adding these prequel-era passages that stick out so glaringly.

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2 hours ago, Nick1Ø66 said:

Chen, do you know if the original Marvel Comics Jabba (Star Wars #1, 1977) was based on anything Lucas may have told them at the time, or it is purely the imagination of the artist?

 

Star-Wars-Marvel-Jabba-The-Hutt.jpeg

 

He's an alien from the movie. I don't have a screen grab handy but he can be seen wandering around Mos Eisley. Right after Luke sells his speeder, I think.

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Yeah they just used a background alien as the basis for Jabba in that funnybook. I think you see him walking in Mos Eisley.

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50 minutes ago, Brock Lovett said:

Yeah they just used a background alien as the basis for Jabba in that funnybook.

 

Literally from the very next shot in the film:

 

star-wars4-movie-screencaps.com-6273.jpg

 

The question is: did Lucas ask them to make Jabba (and his aides!) an alien? This comic was out around May 1977, while the film was rolling out, so one could imagine Lucas would want to oversee it, but besides Paul Hirsch's post-hoc remarks we have nothing substantive to go on either this way or that. And if we are to believe that Lucas kept abreast of the comics, then why does Jabba STAY this way in the comics all through April 1980, well after Lucas decided he'd be a "a fat, slug-like creature with eyes on extended feelers and a huge ugly mouth"?

 

Previously, I was inclined to believe the entire episode represents a flourish by the artists: there's no evidence of design work being done on Jabba until the very end of 1980, and in his exhaustive books of both Star Wars AND Return of the Jedi, Rinzler unearthes not one single quote of anyone except George Lucas about wanting to superimpose an alien Jabba in 1977. There's not a word from Phill Tippet about it as far as I'm aware.

 

Since Hirsch's autobiography came out, I'm willing to give Lucas the benefit of the doubt here, although if this comic is any indication, he certainly didn't have the idea of a gigantic slug until it appeared in a doctored draft of the screenplay (quoted above) circa September 1979. It may well be that he didn't bother with the comics after the first couple of strips, or that it was decided not to upset the comic "continuity."

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18 minutes ago, Chen G. said:

Since Hirsch's autobiography came out, I'm willing to give Lucas the benefit of the doubt here, although if this comic is any indication, he certainly didn't have the idea of a gigantic slug until it appeared in a doctored draft of the screenplay circa September 1979.

I've heard a lot of negative things about Hirsch's book, apparently it contradicts a lot of other sources and he seems to take credit for things that don't really make sense. 

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I mean, that sort of thing is very common: Both Kasdan AND Kazanjan each take credit for telling Lucas "Return of the Jedi" was a weak title... Kurtz basically suggests the original idea for what became Star Wars came from a dinner he had with Lucas, which he says was while they were editing American Graffiti, a point by which Lucas had already pitched a space opera to United Artists. Lucas credits himself with convincing Coppola to take on The Godfather after THX-1138, where in fact Coppola took the job a good month prior to all of that...

 

From memory, the one thing that raised an eyebrow for me was Hirsch saying he told Lucas to change the lightsabers and laser bolts to red for the bad guys and blue for the good guys, which was assuredly the situation beforehand (and which would again be the situation in the laser shootouts in Episode II). He said it reminded of him of an art class in college (clearly - although he can't recall it - describing the colours traditionally associated with the Passion and the Spirit) but, ultimately, whether it was Hirsch's idea or not is immaterial.

 

One revelatory thing that I'm inclined to take Hirsch's word on - not least because Brian De Palma also attests to it - is that in the infamous dinner where de Palma "criticised" Lucas' cut, both de Palma and Hirsch attest that it was done more in a joking, teasing, sarcastic manner than just grimely trying to put Lucas down. De Palma himself says he could see that Lucas "made a wonderful film", which is pretty remarkable being that the edit Lucas showed to his friends was far from finished.

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26 minutes ago, Chen G. said:

One relevatory thing that I'm inclined to take Hirsch's word on - not least because Brian De Palma also attests to it - is that in the infamous dinner where de Palma "criticised" Lucas' cut, both de Palma and Hirsch attest that it was done more in a joking, teasing, sarcastic manner than just grimely trying to put Lucas down. De Palma himself says he could see that Lucas "made a wonderful film", which is pretty remarkable being that the edit Lucas showed to his friends was far from finished.

I thought that was pretty clear from Rinzler's book, Lucas himself says that Brian De Palma is usually very caustic and was not being abnormally cruel

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The only change I thought was bad was the re-edit of the part where Count Dooku escapes at the end of Episode II. It's no better and it was basically pointless.

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The re-editing in the prequel trilogy is another kettle of fish we're going into. :lol:

 

To be fair, they can be equally egregious. I quite like the Podrace in Episode I, but the people who say its too long are absolutely right - it is too long, because Lucas added footage from the second lap to the DVD version, footage that was wisely cut from the theatrical cut. All the more egregious since the film never even earned the "Special Edition" moniker: it was just presented as the movie you saw in theatres.

 

Padme's "to be angry is to be human", the peak of the series' moral bankruptcy, was likewise an addition post-dating the earliest theatrical showings. And, for the UHD remaster, Lucas went through all shots in all the films that take place on Tatooine and made the sky dull and grey, ruining some of the prettiest shots in the first two prequels.

 

Revenge of the Sith, however, went virtually unscathed.

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I never cared enough about the PT to much notice, or care, about the changes made over the years. The only ones I'm really aware of that are of significance were replacing puppet Yoda with a CGI Yoda, which I think was a good idea, and the extended Pod Race, which...wasn't. Though apparently Lucas thought it would be so popular that it was trumpeted heavily in advertising on the DVD.

 

That said, I don't think I'd describe changes made to the PT as "equally egregious". You really can't compare the significant alterations to some of the most important, beloved, studied and well known films in Hollywood history with the relative tinkering done in the PT. And given how relatively minor the changes were, I understand why the "Special Edition" title wasn't tacked on. Moreover, most of the PT changes were done much closer to the initial theatrical release. Unlike the OT, the theatrical versions of the PT never really had much of a life on home video, meaning there just aren't as many people who were attached to theatrical versions in the first place.

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20 minutes ago, Chen G. said:

Padme's "to be angry is to be human",

What a weird thing to say in a franchise set in a galaxy filled with non-human living beings :lol:

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48 minutes ago, Edmilson said:

What a weird thing to say in a franchise set in a galaxy filled with non-human living beings :lol:

The very word is racist

 

On the topic of Jabba, the NPR drama replaces him in that scene with a character called "heater"

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6 hours ago, JTN said:

I never understood how Jabba grew so big between ANH and ROTJ.


Did you see the size of those frogs he was eating?

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9 hours ago, JTN said:

Everything that doesn't drastically changes the plot

Please list SE changes that effect the plot. The changes are aesthetic, with exception of the Jabba scene, which does not effect the plot as it has no new information.

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Some early memories...I still remember reading the TIME magazine review of EMPIRE calling it "A better Film than Star Wars" admiring the pictures in it when it came out. I was 11 then and it was in the school library. But the movie came out a year later in our cinema. I hadn't seen it and I was amazed with the full ad that was in the newspaper.  At that point I hadnt seen any of the films. My Janitor saw me admiring it. He came over and told me the whole frickin  story and also clearly mentioned that this guy in the black mask was his [Spoiler] Father and that he cut Lukes hand off!! ...LOL.

 

Luckily I had forgotten about it until I saw the movie much later [ year after] via our VCR.

 

I had the Story of EMPIRE Movie Tie In book. And then it became my favourite movie.

 

 

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Yeah, knowledge of the Vader reveal is so ubiquitous. I first showed them to my daughter when she was 8, had never seen them or heard me talk about them, but had picked up from school that Luke was Vader's son. Having done this exercise with a few people, I've come to the conclusion that chronological is the way to go.

 

Complaints of the prequels "ruining" the twist in Empire seem to overlook how big a deal it is that the hero turns evil half way through the story, and I've read accounts from a number of people who saw them first chronologically, and were shocked by what Anakin did in RotS. The Vader "twist" now becomes dramatic irony, because we know why he's so "obsessed with finding young Skywalker."

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1 hour ago, Schilkeman said:

Yeah, knowledge of the Vader reveal is so ubiquitous. I first showed them to my daughter when she was 8, had never seen them or heard me talk about them, but had picked up from school that Luke was Vader's son. Having done this exercise with a few people, I've come to the conclusion that chronological is the way to go.

 

Complaints of the prequels "ruining" the twist in Empire seem to overlook how big a deal it is that the hero turns evil half way through the story, and I've read accounts from a number of people who saw them first chronologically, and were shocked by what Anakin did in RotS. The Vader "twist" now becomes dramatic irony, because we know why he's so "obsessed with finding young Skywalker."

 

Yeah, but if you watch them chronologically, you have to slog through three films of dubious quality before you get to the really good stuff.

 

But I just generally think that release order is the way to watch...well, just about anything. When you make a prequel, you're not saying, "Oh man, if only you'd seen this first!" (Or at least, you shouldn't be.) It's more like, "Oh man, you liked that? You'll never believe what led up to that!"

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I still have my teaser poster in a roll somewhere. I ordered it from the Star Wars Insider mail order section some 26 years ago. What a nerd.

56 minutes ago, Datameister said:

Yeah, but if you watch them chronologically, you have to slog through three films of dubious quality before you get to the really good stuff.

I whole-heartedly disagree, but hey. George made a hexalogy that works forwards and backwards just about equally. That's pretty cool in my book.  

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1 hour ago, Datameister said:

When you make a prequel, you're not saying, "Oh man, if only you'd seen this first!" (Or at least, you shouldn't be.) It's more like, "Oh man, you liked that? You'll never believe what led up to that!"

 

In all fairness, I think Lucas was aiming at the latter: that he wasn't wholly succesfull at crafting his prequels like that is another matter. Certainly, in the case of his films I'd advocate watching by production order: the Vader twist is becoming less ubiquitous in the popular awareness by the year: when I saw the films with my young cousin, he was none the wiser. Best to maintain that.

 

But - going back to a point I made a couple of pages ago - in 2024, a young person looking for Star Wars content is far, far more likely to stumble first into at least one the latest movies and shows, and that's sure to impact (almost uniformally in negative way) on their experience of the original film. Having the film labeled as "Episode IV" sure doesn't help the neophyte to know better!

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Around the time of Empire (in the issue of Time that @Amer mentioned) Lucas first floated the idea that this would be like a Greek epic. You would start in the middle, then go back to the beginning, then finish up at the end. So watch them that way.

 

When I was 11 the reason that the TWIST of Darth Vader telling Luke Skywalker he is his father didn't do anything for me is that I (and James Earl Jones) just assumed he was lying. The big twist of The Empire Strikes Back is that the movie ends with them not rescuing Han Solo!

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33 minutes ago, Tallguy said:

ucas first floated the idea that this would be like a Greek epic. You would start in the middle, then go back to the beginning, then finish up at the end.

 

If those were Lucas' words, they're surely the words of a man who's never read a Greek epic. :lol:

 

33 minutes ago, Tallguy said:

When I was 11 the reason that the TWIST of Darth Vader telling Luke Skywalker he is his father didn't do anything for me is that I (and James Earl Jones) just assumed he was lying.

 

That's a curious phenomenon, that I'm told is very common with kids. As a adult, it always seemed very clear to me that you don't introduce something that heightens the stakes only to then reveal it a ruse. That's why I never held much with the idea that Lucas introduced this into his drafts thinking that, if it doesn't land with audiences, he will reveal it to be bluff.

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59 minutes ago, Chen G. said:

If those were Lucas' words, they're surely the words of a man who's never read a Greek epic. :lol:

 


I was about to say, how on Earth is that an element of Greek epics? It reminds me of people calling the Prequels (and the dialogue specifically) 'Shakespearean'. It's one of those things that sounds nice on paper but if you stop to think about it you really start to draw blanks

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I mean, Greek Epics do tend to open in medias res but they certainly don't then go back around to the backstory and then proceed to the resolution. But you're right, its one of those soundbite-y terms - I'd also throw "Wagnerian" into the mix - that has become meaningless through its use to describe certain films, Star Wars included.

 

I think Lucas did think of Oedipus Rex at the time of Revenge of the Sith, but principally through the summary of the work provided by Bettelheim, who was a Freudian. Otherwise, that's little that's "Greek" about Star Wars.

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2 hours ago, Tallguy said:

just assumed he was lying.

Me too! Because I was rooting for Luke, my hero. But then in the Millenium Falcon when Vader calls out to Luke, Luke asks Obi-Wan why he didn’t tell him, and then I realized that Vader was in fact telling the truth and it hit me like a stick that it is true. Back when films had twists like that… Miss those times…

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15 hours ago, Amer said:

Some early memories...I still remember reading the TIME magazine review of EMPIRE calling it "A better Film than Star Wars"

 

It is a better film, and the best film in the saga. And, IMO, other than the original, the only Star Wars film that can be regarded as a cinematic classic in its own right, and certainly the last truly great Star Wars film. 

 

13 hours ago, Datameister said:

 

Yeah, but if you watch them chronologically, you have to slog through three films of dubious quality before you get to the really good stuff.

 

But I just generally think that release order is the way to watch...well, just about anything. When you make a prequel, you're not saying, "Oh man, if only you'd seen this first!" (Or at least, you shouldn't be.) It's more like, "Oh man, you liked that? You'll never believe what led up to that!"

 

Agreed on both counts. Setting aside the issue of spoilers, as you correctly point out, adult viewers at least may not get to the latter films if they have to slog through the prequels.  The same, to a lesser extent, holds true for The Hobbit (though this may not be as much an issue for children as adults).

 

But even if the prequels were fantastic, release order, in all cases for all film series, is the correct answer, at least for first time viewers.

 

15 hours ago, Schilkeman said:

Please list SE changes that effect the plot. The changes are aesthetic, with exception of the Jabba scene, which does not effect the plot as it has no new information.

 

I don't know about that. Admittedly, I've only seen the most recent ESB SE once, and that was a while ago, but I believe the new Vader/Emperor dialogue, taken on its face, suggests that Vader learns Luke's identity from the Emperor at that moment, which is of course absurd. Whereas in the theatrical, it's clear Vader had already figured that out himself...and perhaps was even concealing it from the Emperor.

 

I don't disagree with the logic of sticking Ian Mcdiarmid in the SE, but they should have kept the dialogue as is. IMO the changed dialogue is not only unnecessary and clunky, but does present a subtle change in character and motivation, and by extension, plot.

 

15 hours ago, Schilkeman said:

Yeah, knowledge of the Vader reveal is so ubiquitous. I first showed them to my daughter when she was 8, had never seen them or heard me talk about them, but had picked up from school that Luke was Vader's son. Having done this exercise with a few people, I've come to the conclusion that chronological is the way to go.

 

Complaints of the prequels "ruining" the twist in Empire seem to overlook how big a deal it is that the hero turns evil half way through the story, and I've read accounts from a number of people who saw them first chronologically, and were shocked by what Anakin did in RotS. The Vader "twist" now becomes dramatic irony, because we know why he's so "obsessed with finding young Skywalker."

 

Yeah, to each their own, but assuming the viewer doesn't know Vader is Luke's father (knowledge of which may be ubiquitous, but as I think @Chen G. correctly points out, perhaps not as much as we suppose), I think the drama of the Vader reveal, one of the greatest moments in cinematic history, outweighs anything that might be gained by watching chronologically. But this is definitely a matter of personal taste, I won't argue with anyone who feels otherwise. I will say that I think recommending chronological order to first time viewers is robbing them of something special. 

 

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Its not just the Vader reveal, it lots of things: I like quoting that essay and with good reason, as its probably the best essay ever written on Star Wars period and is certainly very apposite when it reads:

 

Quote

The success of “Star Wars” has obviated a lot of its original virtues. Much of the fun of watching the film for the first time, now forever inaccessible to us, was in the slow unveiling of its universe: Swords made of lasers! A Bigfoot who co-pilots a spaceship! A swing band of ’50s U.F.O. aliens! Mr. Lucas refuses to explain anything, keeping the viewer as off-balance as a jet-lagged tourist in Benares or Times Square. We don’t see the film’s hero until 17 minutes in; we’re kept watching not by plot but by novelty, curiosity.

 

Subsequent sequels, tie-in novels, interstitial TV shows, video games and fan fiction have lovingly ground this charm out of existence with exhaustive, literal-minded explication: Every marginal background character now has a name and a back story, every offhand allusion a history. But Mr. Lucas’s universe just doesn’t have the depth of Tolkien’s Middle-earth; it was only ever meant to be sketched, not charted.

 

This is true on many levels. One that I already mentioned was the entire segment of the Droids stranded in the Tatooine wilderness... it only really ever works if the audience is discovering Tatooine for the first time with the Droids. After the prequel trilogy - which is to say nothing of the interstitial entries to come out since - the planet and its inhabitants become so familiar to the audience that the tension in a lot of these scenes is lost.

 

But, more generally, I think they just make the the original film feel a little too provinicial and quaint: we can grumble about synthetic and over-the-top many of the visuals and setpieces in the prequel trilogy may be, but on some level or another, they ARE a lot more spectacular and more sprawling. So to go from that, to a modest, medium-budgeted space adventure made in 1976 is going to make the feel that bit too cramped.

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16 minutes ago, Chen G. said:

Its not just the Vader reveal, it lots of things: I like quoting that essay and with good reason, as its probably the best essay ever written on Star Wars period

 

100%. An absolutely phenomenal piece. If it didn't mean we'd lose The Empire Strikes back, (and all the great JW scores) there's a part of me that would like to see a world where Star Wars stopped with Star Wars.

 

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1 hour ago, Nick1Ø66 said:

there's a part of me that would like to see a world where Star Wars stopped with Star Wars.

 

You know, when I first saw the original film, I was kind of surprised that it wasn't the final entry because - having missed the flurry of shots of Vader flying away into space unscathed - it seemed like such a full-stop of an ending.

 

Having said that, Vader DOES survive, there's a (franly hackneyed) love triangle between the three leads that Lucas only really starts setting-up in the final reel, and is played up right through to the very end. Luke has yet to wield his father's sword into battle, etc... so it definitely wouldn't feel entirely satisfying if it was left by its lonesome.

 

And, to be fair, I think the issues Kreider talks about don't particularly pertain to The Empire Strikes Back or, for all its shortcomings, to Return of the Jedi, either. Its really an issue of the prequels - because of how they've been concieved rather than how they're executed - and perhaps especially of the recent spinoffs. 

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Yeah. Either Star Wars stops with Star Wars, but if not, they had to finish the story. As somewhat unsatisfying an ending Jedi is, it's still an ending. Beyond that, I've really come to the conclusion over time that the original trilogy told a complete story, and there really wasn't much need to go anywhere from there. 

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1 minute ago, Nick1Ø66 said:

there really wasn't much need to go anywhere from there. 

 

Forwards? No.

 

Backwards? I think the prequel trilogy - in some form or another - was inevitable. You can't have something as massive as the hero's father, and the lynchpin of the final resolution of the story, only summarised in an exposition dump by Sir Alec Guinness. Once that idea was introduced, it begged to be seen.

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7 minutes ago, Chen G. said:

Backwards? I think the prequel trilogy - in some form or another - was inevitable.

 

The PT may have been inevitable, but I don't think it was necessary. It had that worst element of prequels in that it was demystifying, and ultimately, IMO, detracts from the OT. 

 

7 minutes ago, Chen G. said:

You can't have something as massive as the hero's father, and the lynchpin of the final resolution of the story, only summarised in an exposition dump by Sir Alec Guinness.

 

Of course you can, and did. It all worked very well.

 

7 minutes ago, Chen G. said:

Once that idea was introduced, it begged to be seen.

 

Perhaps. Or begged to be left to the imagination. In any event, the execution didn't live up to the promise. Sometimes things are better left alone.

 

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6 hours ago, Unlucky Bastard said:

Someone's not necessarily wrong for preferring to watch the films in chronological order, but I feel they'd be doing their normie friends a great disservice by depriving them of the surprises they'd experience from release order if they insisted on showing them chronological order first.

 

That's all I'm talking about, yeah. I've certainly enjoyed the films chronologically before. (I'm a lot more likely to crave ANH after ROTS than I am to crave TPM after ROTJ!) It's just a question of what's the best way to see it first. And I think release order is the only way to go, for many reasons. 

 

Then again, my first exposures to Star Wars were bits of different scenes from the OT, on television, with no context or order. So what do I know. :P

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4 hours ago, Nick1Ø66 said:

The PT may have been inevitable, but I don't think it was necessary. It had that worst element of prequels in that it was demystifying, and ultimately, IMO, detracts from the OT.

 


If, for the sake of argument, Lucas had made the episodes in order from I to VI, there wouldn't have been this sense of things being demystified. We would've just accepted, to use the obvious example, that the Force "speaks" through midi-chlorians, and so on.

 

The problem too is that, before the PT came along to explain things, we held our own ideas of what it all meant for about two decades. A long time... So it became this kinda jarring experience to have it finally revealed to us, and it clashed with what we thought we knew.

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8 hours ago, Chen G. said:

This is true on many levels. One that I already mentioned was the entire segment of the Droids stranded in the Tatooine wilderness... it only really ever works if the audience is discovering Tatooine for the first time with the Droids. After the prequel trilogy - which is to say nothing of the interstitial entries to come out since - the planet and its inhabitants become so familiar to the audience that the tension in a lot of these scenes is lost.


I agree with the overall sentiment but not this particular point. If you're well versed on Tattooine you would know just how dangerous the Dune Sea is between the Krayt Dragons and Tusken Raiders, so the tension would still be there (especially since they walk past a Krayt Dragon skull)

Ultimately it depends on how much stock you put into the 'blind' watching experience, because otherwise you're basically getting the equivalent of rewatching something you've already seen, which if the movie is good enough still manages to make you feel the tension. Like the ending battle of A New Hope, despite it being a foregone conclusion and the 20th or so time I've seen it, the filmmaking makes it incredibly tense

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I love the droid sequence in IV after watching III. RotS is the operatic high point of the series, we're kind of dying to know what happens next, and it's like, let's spend 20 minutes on a droid adventure. It feels like it's fucking with you. I know it wasn't created with the intent to contrast with RotS, but it works in a weird way. It makes the film feel a little more experimental after the driving narrative of the previous movie.

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1 hour ago, Brock Lovett said:

Star Wars (A New Hope), Directed by George Lucas, is the best SW movie.

Unpopular and downright outrageous, "possibly" stupid opinion: 

 

Maybe, just maybe...

 

Spoiler

STAR WARS should have been a standalone film, never to be continued. 

 

 

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It's the only one of the six that doesn't have at least one moment I mostly get through rather than enjoy.

 

Empire - The whole of "How ya feeling kid?" Hamill's cheese at the Vader reveal. "Luke. Father. Son, come with me."

 

Jedi - The whole middle 40 minutes between the end of the Jabba sequence, and Luke meeting Vader. I know it's setting up a lot of stuff, but it just feels slow, and I was never that enamored of the speeder chase.

 

Phantom - "You come from a warm planet Annie," feels apropos of nothing to that point. "No, I beg you to help us," just some bad acting from Portman in that scene.

 

Clones - “I’ve been dying a little bit each day since you came back into my life.” George, I love you. I will defend the fireplace scene with my dying breath like Padme defending Anakin, but that scene is garbage.

 

Sith - Sidious's duel with the four Jedi is wholly unconvincing, and a chore to watch. Luckily, it is short. 

 

I never get that feeling watching Star Wars. It's a jewel of a film.

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And maybe, again, just maybe, after making STAR WARS, George Lucas should have moved right on to making RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK, instead of doing a sequel (as good as it turned out). 

 

***

 

Btw @Schilkemanit's a great idea what you did there:

 

What are you least favourite moments in the Star Wars films?

 

Mine:

 

ANH: The only scene I don't particularly like - the score, too, I always skip it - is the trash compactor scene. It feels like a filler, GL ran out of ideas and had to kill some runtime, so he created that scene. And when Han crushes the "steel" pole it looks so ridiculous. 

 

ESB: Well... the Hoth scenes are too long for me, and the pacing is so strange, the film should end with the battle of Hoth, not start with it. Somehow it feels like it's the highpoint and the whole movie is downhill from there. 

 

ROTJ: Again, the ewok scenes are fillers to kill precious runtime. What a waste.

 

TPM: The podrace scene, although it looks cool, is completely unnecessary and doesn't belong in a Star Wars film. 

 

AOTC: The Anakin-Amidala courting scenes are mushy and unnecessary. I want a Star Wars film, not a teen romance.

 

ROTS: The beginning with the rescue is way too long and again, it should have ended there, with Anakin killing Dooku before the Emperor, and then, at the end become Darth Vader, but without the helmet and armor, thus not ruining ANH by giving away Darth Vader's look for those who watch the films in Lucas-chronology.

 

I don't want to list the sequels since I don't consider them real Star Wars films, and haven't even watched The Rise of Palpatine. 

 

 

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