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Sharkissimo

What is the most disturbing film you've seen?

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(don't want to browse several pages)

Why not? You don't like to read what people here have to say?

Speaking for myself, coming late to a multi-page topic can make it much too time consuming to catch up with what's been posted before. That's why I often stay away from the main threads on the site and thus sometimes miss out on the big Williams/Spielberg/Star Wars discussions.

Anyway, back to the topic at hand, and a bit more seriously than with the Holiday Special. I agree with Chris about Synecdoche NY's disturbing-ness, especially considering that Kaufman's scripts have a history of being unusual, odd, and frequently about depressed characters, but not usually depressing as a whole.

It's only mildly disturbing compared to some of the big fish though. Funny Games has already been mentioned, and I haven't dared to watch another Haneke. Requiem for a Dream is also one of the most disturbing films I've seen.

I still have to watch Lynch's Mulholland Dr.. I once saw the first 30 minutes before I had to turn it off.

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I believe Alex and I share the same fundamental cinematic values. And I respect that and am pleased to find someone who appreciates the same things as deeply as I do. But he does seem to cleave too hardly to that ideal, to the neglect of so much else that is worthwhile.

Interesting. What do I neglect?

I couldn't know that specifically or with any certainty. But I can surmise from your commentary on here: the things that you place the most value on, and the degree to which the lack of those things hurts a film in your eyes, and based on that, there must be a great deal of work out there replete with redeeming qualities that nevertheless does nothing for you. We like what we like of course, and I'm not suggesting you're wrong for what you like - I like it too. But from my perspective you do seem to miss out on a lot.

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:nod:

What's that mean, Quintus? Just in a combative, dismissive mood?

All I know is you're probably gonna end up gutted when your JWFan idol finally watches Interstellar and highly likely hates it :mrgreen:

He already watched it and hated it. And I was unfazed because... he's not my JWFan idol(?).

Seriously mate, get a grip.

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Cremers has already watched Interstellar: http://www.jwfan.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=24637&page=58#entry1116307

Interstellar:

I found Interstellar to be even worse than Gravity. The way Nolan addresses the viewer (through the characters and their dialogue) was almost unbearable. The style was also quite ordinary and entirely devoid of irony and artistry. How strange that the director dares to compare the style with 2001: A Space Odyssey (Nolan said that Interstellar is like 2001 because the story is not told through the characters, which most movies do, even TDK). What?! Interstellar is a very conventional film told from the sentimental and emotional point of view of the characters, just like any other blockbuster. The characters tell the story here, not the director. Matthew McConaughey even whispers his way through the whole movie as if he is explanatory dictionary! And all the goddamn crying and weeping! I can't tell you how much my mouth fell open from bewilderment and disbelief. 'Love conquers time and space!' Man, Interstellar is even too sweet for Spielberg. I'm not a fan of Nolan's house composer Hans Zimmer but his contribution was actually the only positive point that I could find in this film. 2/10

Alex

EDIT: Damn thou, TGP!

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"The Silence Of The Lambs" is one the most un-intentionally bad films ever released. It has no atmosphere, and it is filled with portentious, and pretencious performances. All that "looking almost direct to camera" stuff, makes me laugh my head off!. Honestly, I can't take it seriously, at all. it is truly awful. Sorry, guys; I know that a lot of people near-worship it, but give me "Hannibal", any day - nasty, gory fun.

All last week, a whole bunch of us at work were saying "it puts the lotion in the basket" Funeee!

Interesting perspective. I have to wonder what you would find "atmospheric."

Off the top of my head, I would say that "Bad Day At Black Rock" is one of the most claustrophobic films I have seen.

Would you say you prefer formalist to auteurist cinema, then?

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I go for emotional atmosphere, rather than the visual, or audio experience.

Fair enough. I like all three myself (and when a film hits on all three, it's fantastic). But seeing as I'm not apologetic about my admiration for Silence of the Lambs, I certainly don't expect you to be so about your dislike of it. To each his own!

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The cinematography of Seven is stunning - the look and feel of the world is great, you really get absorbed in its atmosphere. You feel like you are in the rainy streets of the nameless city with the characters. The editing and scoring help with this too.

It IS stunning and most movies today are still copying its style, compositions and especially its monochromatic color tones.

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yes its a detriment to film. Absolute detriment. The world is in vivid color. But weak directors are afraid of color.

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So . . . movies like this, and all other thrillers/horror films with this sort of washed-out exposure, should look like The Wizard of Oz? You really think that would be a unique cinematic statement?

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So . . . movies like this, and all other thrillers/horror films with this sort of washed-out exposure, should look like The Wizard of Oz? You really think that would be a unique cinematic statement?

did I say that. JFC the leaps people take.

Overall films are using the washed out colors and it's a phase but they look awful. It works in some perhaps even a 2nd rate film like Se7en. But MOS and others it does not. It even makes CGI look like CGI.

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I believe Alex and I share the same fundamental cinematic values. And I respect that and am pleased to find someone who appreciates the same things as deeply as I do. But he does seem to cleave too hardly to that ideal, to the neglect of so much else that is worthwhile.

Interesting. What do I neglect?

The one truly "timeless" film is, and always will be, is "2001: A Space Odyssey".

"The Silence Of The Lambs" is one the most un-intentionally bad films ever released. It has no atmosphere, and it is filled with portentious, and pretencious performances. All that "looking almost direct to camera" stuff, makes me laugh my head off!. Honestly, I can't take it seriously, at all. it is truly awful. Sorry, guys; I know that a lot of people near-worship it, but give me "Hannibal", any day - nasty, gory fun.

Richard might be on to something. I do agree that outside the story and the characters (which work very nicely the first time you watch it), there's very little to take away from Silence during repetitive viewing. Over the years, the character that is Hannibal has become some kind of caricature.

I wouldn't try to take away the pleasure of watching "TSOTL" from anyone, but I guess it's just not for me. Also, I work in that general mileu, so when I see it on screen, I'm just not affected by all the posturing. As Javier Bardem said "so dull, so dull". I just want to shout "get a life!" at the characters.

One of the most "emotionally" disturbing films I have seen is "Fanny And Alexander", a supremely fine-looking film with such an air of repression, and foreboding.

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So . . . movies like this, and all other thrillers/horror films with this sort of washed-out exposure, should look like The Wizard of Oz? You really think that would be a unique cinematic statement?

did I say that. JFC the leaps people take.

Overall films are using the washed out colors and it's a phase but they look awful. It works in some perhaps even a 2nd rate film like Se7en. But MOS and others it does not. It even makes CGI look like CGI.

And to think people are accusing me for missing out on a lot. Personally, when it comes to art and experimenting, I think you are a lot more closed-minded than me, Joey. I'm glad we have all this different styles.

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