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Josh500

Does anybody still listen to JW on actual CDs?

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Light scratches and flecks have never affected playback for me. It's not like you're using them as a frisbee or scraping them on bricks or concrete.

I know, but it's not a question of whether playback is affected or not (anybody would be bothered if their CD doesn't play right). Rather, it's a question of how pristine you want your archival collection to be and remain...

I would have to say, most of my CD's are still as pristine as the day I bought them. I never mishandle them, always touch them at the edges and the hole in the middle.

Of course sometimes one falls and it has light scratches, but I've never had one become bad or skip as a result.

Listen to my discs all the time. I still make CD-Rs of scores I buy digitally.

I guess I'm doing the opposite of technical evolution and common sense.

That is fine by me. :)

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Yes that's how my mind works too. But if I don't immediately know what to listen to I have an MP3 player with a selection of music because it's easy to hook it up in the car, instead of taking a bunch of CD's like I used to.

So I'm actually cheating a bit. :blush:

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I haven't got around to connecting my computer to my amp. I see no need at this time. Plus, I've lost too many hard drives (and back ups) to even want to go down that road again. I enjoy looking at my collection, I enjoy reading the booklets while listening, and I simply love the whole process of scanning the collection, pulling out the CD, putting it in the player, hit play and sitting back and enjoying the sounds.

I am also a bit of a dynamic range snob and as far as '60s, '70s and '80s albums go, the original releases on CD trump most of the hi-rez digital files out there.

I still *buy* CDs, of course, although I'm once again running out of shelf space... and out of space for shelves, too. I even usually wait for the CD to arrive before I listen to anything from it, even if e.g. Amazon provides me with free MP3 versions as well.

But I don't really miss taking out the CDs, putting them in, having to swap discs between longer programs etc. I usually listen to full albums, but sometimes it's nice to be able to just put together individual playlists (and it's great for parties or game nights). Plus I have access to my whole collection via the internet so I can listen to it at work.

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Rip the CD to FLAC when it first comes in my possession, then I take the CD and put it in a binder. I really don't use them after that--they're a backup should I ever lose my computer music library (not likely) or ever have to prove I own the music (not likely either). I think the last time I had a Wiliams CD playing was probably in my previous car with a CD player before mp3 players became commonplace.

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I'm not as picky about sound quality this and that, and it's so much easier to organize, manipulate, and mix and match digitally (playlists 'n' all), that I don't make nearly the effort to change out CDs that I used to. It's just simpler this way, IMO.

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Which is pointless anyway cause hard drives aren't really that durable. ;)

Karol

Wait, what? I don't know how I missed this one the first time through the thread. Hard drives are far more durable than they used to be. Over the years I've had probably eight or nine hard drives, and only one truly died before I had either bought a bigger one or stopped using that computer. It was an external drive too that got carried to and from school. Since then I've dropped external drives and banged my laptop around a bit. No issues. Are they going to outlast your CDs...obviously not, but how hard is it to back up a FLAC/MP3/AAC collection on a 3.0 USB drive when compared to re-ripping all those CDs to use on a computer library? Time is worth something too.

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Which is pointless anyway cause hard drives aren't really that durable. ;)

Karol

Wait, what? I don't know how I missed this one the first time through the thread. Hard drives are far more durable than they used to be. Over the years I've had probably eight or nine hard drives, and only one truly died before I had either bought a bigger one or stopped using that computer. It was an external drive too that got carried to and from school. Since then I've dropped external drives and banged my laptop around a bit. No issues. Are they going to outlast your CDs...obviously not, but how hard is it to back up a FLAC/MP3/AAC collection on a 3.0 USB drive when compared to re-ripping all those CDs to use on a computer library? Time is worth something too.

A couple of mine died, without dropping or banging. So there's that. :)

Karol

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I don't listen to CDs until I rip them to digital. I've been trying for years to completely digitize and organize my music collection. It's very boring and slow work, and I'm realizing that after being glued to a computer at work all day, I can't do the same in the evenings.

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F*** Enhanced CDs... I'm totally unable to rip anymore my CD of HP & The Prisoner of Azkaban to get FLACs :angry:

 

Help anyone!

 

EDIT: I'm trying CDex instead of EAC.... seems to work!

 

Pheeeeew!

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50 minutes ago, Bespin said:

It may be my CD/DVD players. I've just updated the firmwares.

Although I seem to remember EAC wouldn't recognize my old copy of PoA from 2004, but recognized the later 2010's pressing, so it could be that too.

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I have so much types of CDs in my collection (there were many anti-piracy methods over the years), that picking up one like that 20 years after and try to make FLACs out of it, is much complicated than I originally expected!

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About 90-95 percent of music I listen from CDs. The exception are situations when I’m away from home or I want to listen to something, but don’t  have it, so I use Spotify. I think that CD’s enhances the pleasure of experiencing music, at least in my case. I never buy digital music, WAV, MP3 etc. And I'm not going to.

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