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Hans Zimmer's DUNKIRK


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This approach to wanting films to be almost ascetic in their storytelling, or that those kind of films are somehow "purer," is such horse crap to me.  These are tricks that storytellers have been usin

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3 hours ago, Quintus said:

I just don't trust critics in relation to Christopher Nolan movies anymore. It's all overblown fawning and hyperbolic second coming of Christ crap.

 

Not true. The critics were very critical of Interstellar. I can't believe how much I enjoyed the movie after reading about how bad it was from the critics. 

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Were talking about pre-release hype here and i swear i read glowing reviews of 'The Love Guru' before that came out. 

 

Also, if that movie had a 'troubled history' and wasn't directed by someone sold to people as 'important' and trendy (think 'John Carter') you betcha there would be cackling, eye-rolling and lots of coverage how it never makes back its budget. 

 

So chances are it will be another war movie that is probably very long and very loud and (hopefully) short on pathos. 

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On 18-7-2017 at 6:43 AM, Koray Savas said:

I'm telling ya, the auteur directors inspired by the French new wave are disappearing and the studio system is taking over like the early days of Hollywood. 

 

You're almost 40 years late with this observation

 

6 hours ago, Koray Savas said:

No. 

 

How can you not know this? :blink:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Hollywood

 

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On 19/07/2017 at 7:04 AM, Koray Savas said:

2-hour ClassicFM interview with Nolan about his collaborative relationship with Zimmer.

 

For those outside the UK, enter this postal code: SW1W 0NY, and you will be able to listen to the interview. Otherwise there are written excerpts. 

 

This was on when I was driving home from work.

It was either two hours of Zolan, or a cool-as-fuck Herbie Hancock retrospective, on Radio 3...

I sent Classic FM my apologies.

 

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3 hours ago, Richard said:

 

This was on when I was driving home from work.

It was either two hours of Zolan, or a cool-as-fuck Herbie Hancock retrospective, on Radio 3...

I sent Classic FM my apologies.

 

 

You made the correct choice.

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4 hours ago, James said:

...

 

Great post!

 

10 hours ago, Quintus said:

 

I found this out myself last week and thought, wow, how refreshing. So I'm definitely really fancying this now, just not at the cinema.

 

I'm sure you've expounded on it before, but what exactly is the reasoning for your avoidance of the cinema, even for something you're fancying?

 

10 hours ago, Koray Savas said:

2-hour ClassicFM interview with Nolan about his collaborative relationship with Zimmer.

 

For those outside the UK, enter this postal code: SW1W 0NY, and you will be able to listen to the interview. Otherwise there are written excerpts. 

 

This is fantastic.  Great listening for anyone who appreciates film and music. 

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Back from it a second time...some thoughts on the score:

 

I'm now even more curious how the album will handle it. I listened to Supermarine a fair number of times after last week, so I had it fairly fresh in mind...but the sound editors don't present anything as you hear on the album. Take Supermarine - that 8 minute track is sped up, slowed down, chopped and pasted all throughout the entire runtime. Listening to it on its own is probably like - an an analogy - watching The Air sections of the film as one without intercutting to The Mole and The Sea. I'd imagine the rest of the score is similar in this way in terms of how the album will present it. All in all, @Yourfavoratemusic is gonna have a hell of a job putting together a 'film version' mix when the time comes!

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11 minutes ago, TheGreyPilgrim said:

I seriously question if this is a score that would be justified in any way in a "film version."

The only way you can have a film version be a good listening experience is if it's all presented as one, not separate tracks. Think an interview somewhere or the production notes mention that the score as heard in the film is meant to be one long piece.

 

The key really is the 'chopping and screwing' that Nolan's sound editors are doing on this, ESPECIALLY the slow downs/speed ups within cues going along the action on screen.

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Watched Dunkirk twice already, and I can say that I agree with the general critical response - it's the best film of the year, and certainly one of the best works of Nolan.

 

As for the score, I felt that it integrated itself very neatly in the film, and worked well with the Nolan-esque style, helping build emotional and psychological suspense. As a standalone score, however, I wouldn't want to have it on my shelf - it would be a boring listen for me, compared to other Zimmer scores, like Interstellar and Inception, which I do like to listen to once in a while.

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Todd McCarthy of The Hollywood Reporter also lauded the film, calling it "an impressionist masterpiece" and writing: "Although the film is deeply moving at unexpected moments, it's not due to any manufactured sentimentality or false heroics. Bursts of emotion here explode like depth charges, at times and for reasons that will no doubt vary from viewer to viewer. There's never a sense of Nolan – unlike, say Spielberg – manipulating the drama in order to play the viewer's heartstrings. Nor is there anything resembling a John Williams score to stir the emotional pot".

 

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2 hours ago, BloodBoal said:

Another one saying "manipulating the drama" as if it were a bad thing (even thought it's ultimately what cinema is all about!)... Bah!

 

Ah, so you are that poster who thinks the "I could have done more" scene was the best moment in Schindler's List.

 

If Dunkirk is devoid of this kind of cheap emotions then it sounds like good news to me.

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It seems designed for a more movie-naive age, though. It's basically the blunt Demille version (note how Spielberg basically reworks Chaplin's 'Great Dictator' finish). I would have preferred a more subtle scene and bet it would have driven home the point better. So many people cringe about the scene and that cannot have been Spielberg's intention.

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14 minutes ago, Quintus said:

For those cinemagoers who value a powerful sense of catharsis it is an important scene, well earned. 

 

We don't always (or often) agree, but when we do it's a beautiful thing

 

:thumbup:

 

A crucial scene that acts as a release valve for the audience.  But yeah, obviously not the "best" part of the film.

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Just now, Sally Spectra said:

I never knew there was a problem with the "I could have done more scene" until I read all the complaints about it on the internet.

 

The common complaint I can understand more is the final scene with all the actual survivors being unnecessary.  I think it's wonderful, but I can understand the viewpoint of those who don't.

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Just now, Disco Stu said:

 

The common complaint I can understand more is the final scene with all the actual survivors being unnecessary.  I think it's wonderful, but I can understand the viewpoint of those who don't.

 

That didn't really bother me until we see a wide shot of Liam Neeson standing by Oscar Schindler's stone. I'm like "But you're not that important, Liam. For the rest of the movie, you embodied this bloke, but in this one shot, you're just an actor!" Maybe that was the intention of the final shot? That the world depicted in the rest of the film is bigger than one actor? That's so meta!

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1 hour ago, Sally Spectra said:

I never knew there was a problem with the "I could have done more scene" until I read all the complaints about it on the internet.

 

I never knew (like so many other things) till I read JWFan. I was a member of Empire Online forums for years and I don't ever remember it coming up there. I appreciate that the scene is problematic for some, but it's blown all out of proportion by the echo chamber known as JWFan.com. 

 

1 hour ago, publicist said:

I would have preferred a more subtle scene and bet it would have driven home the point better.

 

In retrospect the scene does lay it on too thick, I'd have preferred something more subtle myself. But a couple of culprits here constantly act like it destroys the film and it has essentially become the one main takeaway of Schindler's List on this site. Personally, I think it's just dickhead behaviour. 

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1 minute ago, Muad'Dib said:

 

Lion King and Prince of Egypt say hello.

 

23 and 19 years ago, respectively.  Got any examples more recent?

 

It's obviously fine if Zimmer isn't interested in writing music like that anymore.  I'm not even saying he should, but it would make him "wrong" for certain kinds of films.

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