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E.T 4k Blu-ray & Remastered 1982 OST Soundtrack: 35th Anniversary Set in September


Amer
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2 hours ago, Stefancos said:

I still don't understand what's wrong with 1080? I wouldn't have minded 20 years of it being the default for home video and TV.

 

It's not so much the resolution as the color depth limits and compression limitations of the Blu-Ray format. Also Blu-Ray only uses limited RGB/levels of 16-235 - a leftover from analogue PAL/NTSC technology. Which means there is actually only just over 200 grey levels, and actually the 8-bit color space is not even utilizing the full 8-bit scale, because of this "limited RGB" resolution inherent in the Blu-Ray format. With 4K you get 10-bit which gives you 1024 grey levels and obviously so much more colour information. And the UHD format can actually contain 12-bit video. Not sure if anything is released in 12-bit yet though - I don't think any tv's are more than 10-bit panels anyway. But it makes even finer colour definition possible.

 

Colour reproduction is now close to the actual digital master you see at cinemas, and with newer (OLED) displays that get better and better at showing the full colour space and full contrast of the source, you can now get close to the same display quality (and in some instances much better, depending on the quality of your cinema projector) compared to digital cinema.

 

The 4K resolution is just an extra bonus that makes most sense the bigger tv you have of course.

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What’s up with the cloudiness I often see in white or very bright colors (like skies) in cinemas these days?  It’s like a murkiness or mirage or something.  It takes me out of the movie when I see it.

 

Is it improper projection?  An inevitable byproduct of digital projection?

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@Simon R. Blu-ray is YCbCr 4:2:0, not RGB. The final signal is RGB after several conversion steps, depending on your video processor, that can occur either on your player or on your display. One can make a better job than the other. Check this very interesting article by Spears (not Britney :) ) & Munsil on color space. And if possible, buy their blu-ray calibration disc as it's the best way to properly set your display for the best image it can get.

http://spearsandmunsil.com/portfolio/choosing-a-color-space-2/

 

I sure hope they'll release a calibration disc for the new 4K UHD standard. Speaking of which, the current 4K UHD Blu-ray standard only allows 10-bit color. We won't be seeing discs with 12 or more bits of color in this format, unfortunately.

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5 minutes ago, phbart said:

@Simon R. Blu-ray is YCbCr 4:2:0, not RGB. The final signal is RGB after several conversion steps, depending on your video processor, that can occur either on your player or on your display. One can make a better job than the other. Check this very interesting article by Spears (not Britney :) ) & Munsil on color space. And if possible, buy their blu-ray calibration disc as it's the best way to properly set your display for the best image it can get.

http://spearsandmunsil.com/portfolio/choosing-a-color-space-2/

 

I sure hope they'll release a calibration disc for the new 4K UHD standard. Speaking of which, the current 4K UHD Blu-ray standard only allows 10-bit color. We won't be seeing discs with 12 or more bits of color in this format, unfortunately.

 

I realize it is not RGB natively, but as far as I've been able to figure out, a Blu-Ray's video track(s) are always sourced to be in the limited 16-235 range.....? But for arguments sake, let's say it is actually sourced in full RGB range (0-255), that still is way behind what UHD Blu-Ray and new 10-bit displays can show, and will still cause banding, which is evident on all Blu-Ray's trying to show smooth colour gradients.

 

 

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I think the full RGB range were meant for PC video cards, videogames and etc. For video formats like DVD, Blu-ray, HDTV broadcast and etc, because of the necessity of signal compression to fit the video, this limited RGB (after the YCbCr conversion) was needed. I don't really remember where I read that, actually. I think those banding issues have more to do with the color bit depth, not the color range.

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