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What are your favorite shots in a movie?


John
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  • 2 weeks later...

It's so exquisitely shot! The shot where Welles gets a taste free air with his fingertips...super evocative:

 

13 minutes ago, KK said:

 

Screen-Shot-2021-01-11-at-2-19-09-AM.png

 

It's also a brilliant visual archival of post-war Vienna. That faded Austrian glory against all the rubble...you can't recreate that. Definitely a once-in-a-lifetime kind of film.

 

The only thing that doesn't really sit with me is the music.

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5 hours ago, KK said:

It's also a brilliant visual archival of post-war Vienna. That faded Austrian glory against all the rubble...you can't recreate that. Definitely a once-in-a-lifetime kind of film.

 

It's also largely "geographically correct", i.e. most scenes are edited together in a sequence that is consistent with the real life locations.

 

5 hours ago, KK said:

The only thing that doesn't really sit with me is the music.

 

I agree. I suppose it has a cynical Gemütlichkeit that successfully captures the "Viennese mindset", but it's a bit too much "accompanying music" rather than "film score" for my taste (i.e. I think it could have done more to support the drama/action, rather than just setting the stage).

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  • 1 month later...
1 hour ago, KK said:

What is the film?

 

 

Sindbad (1971), based on sumptiously worded novellas about a late 18th century womaniser who's more of an observer of life than a participant.

In the movie, instead of adhering to the plot(s), they use memory fragments, multiple past stories flowing into each other in a stream of consciousness, with all kinds of quick cutaways to create free associations and try to get across the feel of the original material. Examples of such that I posted above are the oil drops on the soup, the burning embers, and the woman rolling in the snow.

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In the English-speaking world, apart from some limited screenings at the time of its release, Szindbád remained largely unknown for many years. It was issued on DVD in 2011. Critics have invariably praised the sumptuous visual qualities of the film: "the extraordinary (and very beautiful) images that pour over the screen"; "a film of intoxicating voluptuousness"; "a beautiful film ... painterly but not simply pretty, with a late-evening pilgrimage by candlelight that settles in your memory, and possibly the loveliest ice-skating sequence ever put on film. The non-linear and fragmented structure allows the linking of images, sometimes almost subliminally, to evoke Szindbád's memories or his subconscious, and the description "Proustian" has repeatedly appeared in critical assessments (perhaps echoing a frequent characterization of the writings of the author of the original stories, Gyula Krúdy).

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
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I have little patience for that film, but it is shot exquisitely.

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I saw it for the second time yesterday. I still have the feeling that I don't "get" some of it, but ultimately quite a bit of that is probably just the film's (successful) depiction of depression. In any case, while it can't fully win me over, there's much to admire in it - the cinematography and Binoche's performance are first rate, and the use of music is very good, too.

 

They're showing the entire trilogy at a local open air cinema, one week apart, so I might go see the other two as well. I remember not liking the second one (apparently it's supposed to be funny, but I only found it bleak and depressing) and loving the third.

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I admire Binoche and the way the film was shot, but the way it treats music and creativity conceptually seemed incredibly naive and ultimately undermines its thematic ambitions for me.

 

The second one is probably the strongest one actually, and works the best but the third one remains my favourite.

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On 7/15/2021 at 12:51 PM, Glóin the Dark said:

The music is the biggest sticking point for me. It comes across as artificial and derivative.

 

Indeed. Very much feels like a non-musician trying to pontificate about MYUUUUSSSIIIC.  :rolleyes:

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  • 5 weeks later...
On 6/21/2021 at 2:33 PM, KK said:

Black-Narcissus-2021-06-17-at-9-29-06-PM

 

Black-Narcissus-2021-06-17-at-9-37-18-PM

 

Black-Narcissus-2021-06-17-at-9-40-31-PM

 

Black-Narcissus-2021-06-17-at-9-56-15-PM

 

Black-Narcissus-2021-06-17-at-9-43-27-PM

 

Black-Narcissus-2021-06-18-at-10-46-43-A

BLACK NARCISSUS!!!

One the greatest films ever made, and one of the greatest films ever shot!

Jack Cardiff is a certified freakin' genius!!!

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  • 2 weeks later...
5 hours ago, Naïve Old Fart said:

Two more great shots, but I don't recognise the film(s).

@Marian Schedenig, would you please do the honors?

 

The Apartment

(That's Jack Lemmon in both shots)

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Glorious 2.39:1. Door frames start to bulge as soon as they're a centimetres off centre. Those screen caps seem to be minimally off-ratio (the first too wide, the second not wide enough).

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The office shot is heavily inspired on an even older movie but I don't remember which one. And those movies inspired All The President's Man

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