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Schindler's List - 2CD 25th Anniversary Edition from La-La Land Records (2018)


Jay
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55 minutes ago, filmmusic said:

How do we know if we have a fixed pressing or not?

 

The original pressing looks like this:

 

image.png

 

The newer pressing looks like this:

 

image.png

 

55 minutes ago, filmmusic said:

is there any different number on the cd?

 

Great question!  @crumbs, can you post a picture of your Disc 2 (specifically a close-up of the tiny numbers in the inner ring) and somebody else can post a picture of the first pressing?

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2 hours ago, Jay said:

LLL has not announced a replacement plan for this title.

And whether there will be one is up to their customers communicating this issue.

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2 hours ago, Jay said:

LLL has not announced a replacement plan for this title.

26 minutes ago, Brundlefly said:

And whether there will be one is up to their customers communicating this issue.

 

It's clear us and them are not on the same... frequencies!

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I just don’t get how he can be like “don’t think there were any issues” while also they corrected it for the next pressing. It’d be one thing if they’d just left it, but they actually took the time to fix it…

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6 hours ago, Jay said:

Great question!  @crumbs, can you post a picture of your Disc 2 (specifically a close-up of the tiny numbers in the inner ring) and somebody else can post a picture of the first pressing?

 

These ones?

 

SLD2.jpg

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42 minutes ago, Disco Stu said:


I have a first pressing and here’s what mine looks like

 

D6B28C67-B554-4B6C-8DAD-862DDF66C1FA.jpeg

 

Interestingly, that serial number is on the outside ring of my disc 2:

20211023_124240.jpg

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On 20/10/2021 at 11:48 PM, Taikomochi said:

It’s difficult to describe how defects sound, but, to me, there’s this “swishy” quality to it. Almost reminds me of the sound of running water a bit. Maybe someone can describe this better… I can certainly hear it in the first pressing, and I certainly cannot hear it in the revised tracks.

 

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58 minutes ago, bollemanneke said:

So it's the exact same issue as with HP3? I never heard any difference there.

No it's not, we can hear differences in Schindler's List, and I'm not a dog!

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Personnaly, I did the experience of extracting the difference in Audacity between a CD track from Azkaban (where there was a frequencies cutoff) and the equivalent corrected file (by MM himself).

 

And, at my great surprise... there was a difference and IT WAS audible! There was NO music in this difference, but a sort of echo or air "pufffs".

 

So IT CAN BE HEARD.

 

I think these high frequencies ADD something "natural" to the music, by surrounding them by a nice environment.

 

When talking about digital vs analog music... that's about these frequencies we talk.  We need them. If not, the sound seems removed from it's natural environment, digitally imprisoned, dead.

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I've compared the two versions of Buckbeak's Flight, and I can perhaps feel something more going on in the 'fixed' version, but it could just as easily be confirmation bias. It's very difficult to know when not doing it blindly and when believing that one may be better.

 

Which does bring me to a point to ponder.... whoever first opened these files and looked at the frequency view... what were they looking for exactly? Not once have I ever opened up a music track in that view, because as long as I play it and it sounds good, what reason is there to think anything's wrong? I also base this on the fact that not every recording is perfect.

 

And that's why these perceived issues are getting annoying to read about, because it feels like rather than just receiving a set, playing and enjoying it, people are forensically interrogating it, and upon finding anything that's technically not quite as it *could* be, crying foul that their favourite composer has been disrespected, even if the issue is audibly hard to hear (or impossible to).

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Well when i open the files to edit in cooledit, i usually look at the spectrum to check i have saved it lossless and for example if i want to cut silences, that i dont delete anythiing visible in the spectral view (that in the waveform could be a line because the volume is very low). I would have noticed if i had opened the azkaban cues or the schindler ones to make acomplete edit….

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It mainly comes from how easy it can be for one to find fake lossless/upconverted sets online within music download communities. It isn't what one would call rocket science (and the HP3 situation certainly is different from the usual), but it can be a useful tool to suss out discrepancies compared to other editions and sources. And like Luke mentioned above, it's definitely an easy thing to look at in cases where one decides to make edits in audio programs. Plus, it's kind of surprising how much lossy samples can get into music, so it just becomes a thing of regular curiosity after so many checks. (Also, I just think spectograms are neat to look at, regardless of quality.)

Generally, people care heavily about getting the material in the best possible condition for preservation and quality sake. Especially if one is going to pay a great amount of money for it (think Hi-Res releases and the like), and also in case materials do end up getting lost to time. For most people, it's a hard concept to grasp on the basis that such things wouldn't never cross their mind. And for good reason, since sound compression has gotten really strong over the years (that, or the quality didn't matter as long as it didn't feel blatantly off). It's a great contrast between regular listeners and sound nuts, so I imagine it's a bit outlandish for the former camp.

In my opinion, for being that these are supposed to be high profile releases for famous properties, there's already a greater expectation of the amount of care being placed into them. So it becomes a bit of a head scratcher that for as recent as these specific scores are, the fact they had to initially rely on inferior sources reeks of mismanagement in some department along the road. I could excuse it if this was a set that was being sold digitally in all markets, but as a thing that costs $100+ and for a still niche audience, it kind of bugs me that we essentially are beta testers for releases that should have an extra level of refining in the digital age. Guess I shouldn't be too hard on crews that are of an older generation, admittedly.

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Also it's just a good tool in an arsenal to gather information the booklet and marketing didn't provide. Like about the use of album tracks from the album master in Azkaban.

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9 hours ago, Richard Penna said:

I've compared the two versions of Buckbeak's Flight, and I can perhaps feel something more going on in the 'fixed' version, but it could just as easily be confirmation bias. It's very difficult to know when not doing it blindly and when believing that one may be better.

 

Which does bring me to a point to ponder.... whoever first opened these files and looked at the frequency view... what were they looking for exactly? Not once have I ever opened up a music track in that view, because as long as I play it and it sounds good, what reason is there to think anything's wrong? I also base this on the fact that not every recording is perfect.

 

And that's why these perceived issues are getting annoying to read about, because it feels like rather than just receiving a set, playing and enjoying it, people are forensically interrogating it, and upon finding anything that's technically not quite as it *could* be, crying foul that their favourite composer has been disrespected, even if the issue is audibly hard to hear (or impossible to).

That reminds me of a story a German commedian once told: "It is like with your car. You are driving with it, happily and careless, until an expert looks at it and says, 'Oh no, this car is totally out of order, it's just scrap metal.' Which means, you were happy all those years, just because you were missing the respecive expert knowledge to realise how bad the situation actually is."

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If your car was running happily and to your satisfaction, and it took someone with specialist knowleddge to point out that something was wrong, do those things matter? :)

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1 hour ago, Richard Penna said:

If your car was running happily and to your satisfaction, and it took someone with specialist knowleddge to point out that something was wrong, do those things matter? :)

Yes they do indeed.

That is the reason why you are required to get your vehicle regularly checked by an authorized garage who can issue a certificate stating that your car is in good state...

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CDs won't risk killing you in an accident if something about them is not 100% correct. (I now realise my previous comment was a bit flippant from a safety perspective ;) )

 

I realise this view is not shared by many, but I'd rather the labels focused on getting new releases out, and not on trying to fix every little last issue which often pertain just to making people feel like they have a 'technically' flawless product.

 

Note that I am not defending every error they make. Some are genuine problems which interrupt listening, and I hope the label producers make notes to check more carefully for some of those that crop up more often.

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6 minutes ago, Richard Penna said:

CDs won't risk killing you in an accident if something about them is not 100% correct.

I was simply answering your question.

It wasn't me comparing CDs with cars.

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1 hour ago, Richard Penna said:

 

I realise this view is not shared by many, but I'd rather the labels focused on getting new releases out, and not on trying to fix every little last issue.

They could also stop reissuing some scores like poseidon adventure

, the star treks, and others every few years….or making LPs….

 

and if a better, albeit lossy, source for hook exists, use it!

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So i sent La La Land a message through Facebook and they`re still maintaining that there`s nothing wrong with the first pressings. They say it`ll be restocked next year so it looks like if we want a "fixed" edition the only choice is to buy again. 

245853635_590328252279746_6634621506226349935_n.png

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