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John Williams scores that use the organ?


karelm
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Dracula has it in The Attack, The Night Visitor and To Scarborough at least.

 

Home Alone, guys! The choir pieces have an organ under them.

 

Does a calliope count? :P PoA then.

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6 hours ago, Holko said:

Does a calliope count? :P PoA then.

 

The Fury

 

And Gloria of course. I'm surprised nobody has mentioned this, since most people seem to like (and therefore know) it better than I do.

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7 hours ago, Holko said:

Dracula has it in The Attack, The Night Visitor and To Scarborough at least.

 

 

... and in "The Death of Dracula" (my favourite use of the organ in that score), "End Titles"... 

11 hours ago, Knox Harrington said:

I don't recall one in ROTS

 

Me neither from ROTS, but there is an organ in the Finale cue of AOTC. 

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8 hours ago, Holko said:

Dracula has it in The Attack, The Night Visitor and To Scarborough at least.

 

Home Alone, guys! The choir pieces have an organ under them.

 

Does a calliope count? :P PoA then.

 

Home Alone, that's source music, no?

38 minutes ago, Sweeping Strings said:

At 85, his organ maybe doesn't get as much use as it used to. 

He's 87 !

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9 hours ago, Score said:

Me neither from ROTS, but there is an organ in the Finale cue of AOTC.

 

9 hours ago, Faleel J.M. said:

 

 

No real organ in the prequels, just quasi organ synths.

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I assume we're including synth organ in this discussion, in which case I'd point out that POA has numerous uses, and I'm not even talking about the calliope. Consider "Double Trouble on the Hill", or the newly released reprise of the time travel music as Harry and Hermione catch up with the present.

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The CETK concert arrangement features an organ part near the beginning.

 

I'm also hoping he'll use organ (and choir) for an epic, final sendoff at the end of the Star Wars Episode 9 End Credits, like David Arnold did for the end of Independence Day!

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  • 1 year later...

Not sure anyone mentioned this classic. Quite fitting for the raging gale outside my house right now. Also one of JW's most explicit allusions to Bach* since "Steinway" from Fitzwilly!

 

 

*I'm actually of the camp that believes the famous Toccata & Fugue in D is not by Bach. Not that it's a strike against the piece...

 

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  • 3 months later...
On 4/13/2020 at 9:44 PM, Falstaft said:

I'm actually of the camp that believes the famous Toccata & Fugue in D is not by Bach. Not that it's a strike against the piece...

I found this and now I'm a believer that it was young Bach trying to fuse his own music based on his two greatest teachers, Vivaldi and Buxtehude.

.

He never did that again, because he developed his own style.

 

Quote

"Bach’s first attempts at composition, like all early efforts, were unsatisfactory. Lacking any special instruction that would have directed him toward a goal, he was compelled to do what he could in his own way, like others who have set out upon such a career without guidance. [...] Bach does not long follow this course. He early sensed that this endless rushing and leaping would lead to nothing. He realized that musical ideas need to be brought into other and logical relationship, and that, to attain this end, one needs a model. Vivaldi’s violin concertos, just then being published, gave him the guidance he needed. He so often heard them cited as outstanding compositions that he thereby hit upon the happy idea of transcribing them as a group for the keyboard. Hence he studied the progression of the ideas and their relations, variety in modulation, and many other things. The process of adapting the ideas and phrases that were conceived for the violin and which were note suited to the keyboard taught him to think musically, so that, after completing his work, he no linger had to receive his ideas from his fingers but could draw them from his own imagination".

from Forkel's biography of Bach, Chapter 5

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