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Parents and future parents of JWFan: Are you going to introduce your kids to the beloved movies of your youth?

Are you going to watch with your kid the movie series you loved when you were a child?  

14 members have voted

  1. 1. Are you going to watch with your kid the movie series you loved when you were a child?

    • Yeah, but only the classic ones (eg.: LOTR Trilogy, Star Wars Original Trilogy, Star Trek even numbered movies, Terminator 1 and 2, Indy's first 3 movies, etc) and not the shitty sequels (eg.: Hobbit Trilogy, Prequel Trilogy and Disney Era SW, Star Trek odd numbered movies, Terminator 3 onwards, KOTCS, etc)
      5
    • I'll watch everything about the franchise I love with the kid, not only the classics but the crappy installments as well!
      8
    • Nah, I think I'm just going to watch with my kid whatever cartoon is popular with children by then, like Peppa Pig or Steven Universe or something
      1


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Not trying to start a war, but how is the Star Wars sequel trilogy crappy exactly? It's produced one of the three best movies of the franchise, with another in the top five. Perhaps given the release of the apparently dissapointing The Rise of Skywalker the sequel trilogy  seems to lack some coherence, as in, it doesn't feel like there was an overarching plan. I haven't seen the newest installment yet, but I've gotten the impression from reviews and reactions that TFA and TLJ don't quite add up to what we get with TROS, in a sense. That being said, while the trilogy seen as a whole may not be very well structured, I can say for sure that at least TFA and TLJ, as individuals, are genuinely good to great movies. Again, I haven't seen TROS, but to write off these films as crappy is pretty low and seems to overlook the merit of some of their greatest strengths, those being a number of excellent character arcs, stunning cinematography, very good performances (I'm thinking Driver and Hamill here), and Williams' scores. Plus, they're all in good fun!

 

Don't @ me.         

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21 minutes ago, gkgyver said:

To say this sad sequel trilogy produced one of the top 3 movies of the series is just plain obscene. 

 

No, I'm actually with that. The Force Awakens is better than Return of the Jedi and Revenge of the Sith: its an extremly polished production, well-acted and well-photographed. You just can't replace that level of craftmanship.

 

That being said, I'm not sure how I'll introduce my kids to these films: Episodes II and III really spoil the twist of Episode V so a strictly chronological viewing is out of the question. The best I can get it is I, II, IV, V, III, VI. The sequel trilogy doesn't belong: it was and always will be redundant. For me, and my household, the saga ends in Return of the Jedi.

 

Harry Potter ought to to start with The Philosopher's Stone. That film's charm for new audiences is entirely predicated upon it being their very first introduction to the wizarding world, just as it is Harry's. You just can't start with Fantastic Beasts, even though its earlier, chronologically.

 

The Middle Earth films they can watch from An Unexpected Journey through to Return of the King, although those aren't really films for kids.

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1 hour ago, The Illustrious Jerry said:

Not trying to start a war, but how is the Star Wars sequel trilogy crappy exactly? It's produced one of the three best movies of the franchise, with another in the top five. Perhaps given the release of the apparently dissapointing The Rise of Skywalker the sequel trilogy  seems to lack some coherence, as in, it doesn't feel like there was an overarching plan. I haven't seen the newest installment yet, but I've gotten the impression from reviews and reactions that TFA and TLJ don't quite add up to what we get with TROS, in a sense. That being said, while the trilogy seen as a whole may not be very well structured, I can say for sure that at least TFA and TLJ, as individuals, are genuinely good to great movies. Again, I haven't seen TROS, but to write off these films as crappy is pretty low and seems to overlook the merit of some of their greatest strengths, those being a number of excellent character arcs, stunning cinematography, very good performances (I'm thinking Driver and Hamill here), and Williams' scores. Plus, they're all in good fun!

 

Don't @ me.         

 

Agreed.

 

This thread feels like a veiled slight on the trilogy, and other films that are widely liked on this board (Hobbit movies, Star Wars prequels).

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These days children need to be encouraged to have a bit of diversity in their entertainment or they'll happily grow up on a bland buffet of endless CG animations, if you let them. I show my kids the movies which I consider to have good nutritional value, but I don't force absolutely everything that I loved as a kid on them, since there's a lot to be said for finding one's own favourites along the way, in amongst the "accepted classics", which children are generally coerced into seeing anyway at some point. And besides; not all of my childhood favourites are necessarily good, or recommendable movies.

 

So, I've shown my two:

 

E.T.

The Goonies

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (it's the most accessible one of the trilogy, ironically enough).

Jaws

Gremlins

Neverending Story

Bridge to Terabithia

Jurassic Park

The Lord of the Rings

The Hobbit (4hr edited version)

Santa Claus: The Movie

Labyrinth

Home Alone

Avatar

...and probably a couple more I've forgotten.

 

I still need to put Back to the Future on for them, but it's quite a complicated movie and some of its themes are older (my two children are under ten).

 

It's worth mentioning that in my experience, kids rarely want to sit down to see the movies which I suggest they should watch. No Dad, it looks boring! It's old!

 

But every single time they come away glad that they saw it. I believe it's this approach to parenting (in relation to entertainment) which nurtures discerning taste in young minds. It's good for them.

 

Ps: everything stated above can also be applied to music.

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1 hour ago, John said:

 

Agreed.

 

This thread feels like a veiled slight on the trilogy, and other films that are widely liked on this board (Hobbit movies, Star Wars prequels).

 

Well, let me clarify that.

 

From all the 5 SW movies from the Disney Era, I only liked 1 (TLJ) and disliked to various degrees the other 4, so I included them on the "shitty" list. The same with the Hobbits and the Prequels, I don't consider them good movies.

 

However, the thing is that this is my personal opinion. It wasn't my intention with the poll to declare which movies on a given franchise are the good ones and which are the bad ones. If someone considers them to be along with the classics, so be it. The options were sorted based on my opinion, which is no way universal.

 

On the case of this thread, someone might want to show the kid Raiders, Last Crusade and KOTCS, but not ToD, either because he thinks Temple is too violent, or because he considers Crystal Skull better. So, this person would vote for option 1, since ToD would go to the shitty list. Maybe someone will show the kid only the Original Trillogy and the Disney Era movies, but not the prequels, on this case he'll vote for option 1.

 

Option 2 is for those who intend to show their kid ALL the movies (or a great majority of them) on a given franchise, like the 11 SW movies, 4 Indys, 10 Wizarding World flicks, 13 Treks, 9 Elm Street films, etc, even if among these movies there's those ones they don't consider so good or at least essential.

 

2 hours ago, Jay said:

So those of us who are not parents and don't plan to be don't get to participate in this poll?

 

Well, do you have any nephews or nieces? Friends that do have children? If so, do you plan helping their parents choosing classic movies you loved as a young person for them? If you answered yes, so yeah, you can participate. :) 

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2 hours ago, Chen G. said:

 

No, I'm actually with that. The Force Awakens is better than Return of the Jedi and Revenge of the Sith: its an extremly polished production, well-acted and well-photographed. You just can't replace that level of craftmanship.

 

That being said, I'm not sure how I'll introduce my kids to these films: Episodes II and III really spoil the twist of Episode V so a strictly chronological viewing is out of the question. The best I can get it is I, II, IV, V, III, VI. The sequel trilogy doesn't belong: it was and always will be redundant. For me, and my household, the saga ends in Return of the Jedi.

 

Harry Potter ought to to start with The Philosopher's Stone. That film's charm for new audiences is entirely predicated upon it being their very first introduction to the wizarding world, just as it is Harry's. You just can't start with Fantastic Beasts, even though its earlier, chronologically.

 

The Middle Earth films they can watch from An Unexpected Journey through to Return of the King, although those aren't really films for kids.

 

Dude, I couldn't even tell you what TFA was about in terms of plot. 

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Crappy installments? A bit harsh considering there are those that like installments for series if they are good in MY opinion.  Something like Star Wars or Back To The Future if my wife and I are able to have kids then I will be watching all the movies for the series.

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We showed my kid ANH a few weeks ago.  Eventually we’ll watch all of em, when she’s a bit older.  
 

We’ll watch pretty much any movie or show with her, and let her decide what she likes.  She’s pretty easygoing, but if she’s not interested in something I’m not gonna cram it down her throat.  Not watching TV is the healthier option anyway.

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I do not have children, and, at my age, I am not likely to, and this is something I regret.

No matter.

A good film is a good film, no matter what it is. If I had children, I'd like to introduce them to cinema at as early an age, as possible. My earliest memory of cinema preceded my earliest memory of television.

What I would want to "bequeathe" my children, is that cinema is, at its best, a shared experience. While the movie theatre offers large-scale spectacle, the lounge offers the kind of intimacy, comfort, and sense of belonging, that a cinema cannot replicate.

Most of all, I'd like my children to truly discuss what they watch, and not just to accept it, blithely.

Film don't change. GONE WITH THE WIND is, in 2019, exactly the same, as it was in 1939, but times change, and so do people. To engage people actively, in watching and conversing about, films, as they grow from children to adults, is, IMO, and in this context, the best legacy that cinema - and, by extension, parents - can offer.

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Yes, same as Richard. Don't have kids, and doubt I ever will now that I'm already 42.

 

However, I have a younger brother, and I tried to get him into film music when he was a kid. Didn't succeed very well; he's not very music interested. But I managed to alert him to SOME good stuff and composers. He knows names like John Williams, Danny Elfman, James Horner and a few others, which has stuck with him to adult age. I also tried to convince my dad, who IS music interested (especially classical), and while he did enjoy it -- he often played CD-R "mixed tapes" I made for his car use -- nothing really stuck that much.

 

I have a nephew and a niece. They're 2 and 5. But maybe at a later date, I'll at the very least alert them to the power of film music, even if they'll find their own way and musical identities.

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1 hour ago, Jurassic Shark said:

First of all, the LOTR trilogy isn't a classic. 

 

Lol, sure.

 

1 hour ago, Jurassic Shark said:

 

And scariest.

 

It is. I think some scares are good nutrition and quite healthy for kids' imaginations.

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1 hour ago, mstrox said:

We stopped Peppa Pig because of how rude the character is to others. 

If you think that Peppa Pig is rude, try Tracey Beaker.

 

2 hours ago, Jurassic Shark said:

...Peppa Pig is great!

If you like Peppa Pig, try Rastamouse.

 

1 hour ago, Jurassic Shark said:

Nonsense! All Brits are like that! Insulting people while being polite is a skill they've polished for centuries.

Why, thank you, kind sir. Now, please go away, you spotty little oik.

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My kid loves Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings.

She saw Raiders of the Lost Ark, and thought it was ok.  She doesn't have any interest in seeing the others. 

She watched ANH and ESB but doesn't care to see any of the other SW movies. 

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STAR WARS

When my son (my oldest) was six we watched Ewoks 1 together. When he turned seven we watched Ewoks 2 and Star Wars. When he turns eight we will watch Empire and Jedi. I’ll let him discover the rest on his own if he wants to (hopefully no PG-13 ones till he’s thirteen, obviously).

 

STAR TREK

I don’t love any of the movies, really. The TV show is another matter. I expect he’ll get a fair amount of exposure to the TV show starting when he’s old enough to not be bored by it. (Unsure when that would be.)

 

MIDDLE-EARTH

Well, I’m reading him The Hobbit now. The Lord of the Rings is probably at least two years out. I’m not a fan of the movies.

 

TERMINATOR

No, these are rated R; anyway, I’ve never seen them.

 

INDIANA JONES

Raiders, no doubt, when he turns eight. Last Crusade, too, at some point, not sure when, not going to wait till he’s thirteen, though. The PG-13 rating here is obviously bogus and has more to do with Temple of Doom. Which, along with Crystal Skull, he’s on his own to discover if he wants to.

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11 hours ago, Quintus said:

It is. I think some scares are good nutrition and quite healthy for kids' imaginations.

I've posted this, elsewhere, but...in 1975, the B.B.F.C., with a view to giving the film an "AA" certificate, asked a child psychiatrist to watch JAWS. The psychiatrist watched it, after which, the B.B.F.C. asked him if he thought that the film would cause children to have nightmares. His reply: "What's wrong with children having nightmares?".

The film was awarded an "A" certificate.

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On 12/24/2019 at 9:35 AM, Chen G. said:

The Middle Earth films they can watch from An Unexpected Journey through to Return of the King, although those aren't really films for kids.

 

While I think The Hobbit trilogy is much better than the new Star Wars, I would recommend the LoTR trilogy before The Hobbit, it makes a way better first impression.

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On 12/27/2019 at 2:03 PM, Demodex said:

My kid loves Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings.

She saw Raiders of the Lost Ark, and thought it was ok.  She doesn't have any interest in seeing the others. 

She watched ANH and ESB but doesn't care to see any of the other SW movies. 

 

I think Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings are much more child's fantasy, extremely focused on lesson-learning, hand-holding, emotions. Like Zelda... The expressions of characters are very comforting and drawn-out, there's the guardian wizard looking after the child protagonist, "Follow your heart, everything will be okay," and it's much more reliant on relationships. Raiders is a very different adventure style, it's very adult, realistic, hardcore, it features an adult protagonist trying to be badass.

 

Star Wars is a little in between, because the main protagonist is older in personality, he's more free and capable than the guardians Yoda and Obi Wan, and he's less into obeying orders.

 

HP/LoTR is also what I'd call linear adventure, while Raiders/Star Wars is more holistic adventure. I actually prefer the first two series, everything feels grander because there's more layers of knowledge/authority they're shielding the protagonist from; HP and LoTR cater more to world-building mystery, they're always hinting at grander world lore but keeping the protagonist on the steady path they need to be on. Star Wars/Raiders adventure is the opposite, it's more holistic / all-at-once and caters to first-person mystery. The world-building is more predictable while the character progression is freely unfolding, shocking and unpredictable.

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