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RIP Olivia de Havilland


Chen G.
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RIP. She takes an entire era of Hollywood history with her, but she lived a long and interesting life. I can't imagine any of the adults making Captain Blood would have imagined that they would live to see the 85th anniversary of that film. 

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RIP

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59 minutes ago, Chen G. said:

Dame Olivia De Havilland passed in her sleep. RIP.

 

She was there for the Hollywood debuts of Erich Wolfgang Korngold and Errol Flynn (and probably many others) and outlived them and most others of her collaborators by many decades. We generally consider Williams one of the last of a mostly bygone era, but De Havilland was one of the last remnants of an even earlier age.

 

 

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She was there for the Hollywood debuts of Erich Wolfgang Korngold and Errol Flynn (and probably many others) and outlived them and most others of her collaborators by many decades. We generally consider Williams one of the last of a mostly bygone era, but De Havilland was one of the last remnants of an even earlier age. RIP.

 

 

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Hush...Hush, Sweet Charlotte

Lady in a Cage

My Cousin Rachel

The Heiress

Princess O'Rourke (she's stunningly beautiful in this wartime propaganda flick)

Gone With The Wind 

The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex

The Adventures of Robin Hood

It's Love I'm After

 

All worth checking out!

 

 

20200702_082246.jpg

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Two years after the release of Captain Blood, Benny Goodman's recording of Sing, Sing, Sing, the epitome of the swing era, hit the airwaves.

 

 

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I spent the last few years in awe of the simple fact that a movie star from the 1930s (and incidently the star from 1938's Robin Hood which I watched a lot in my childhood) was still living among us. So now it is over. 

RIP madame de Havilland

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This is huge, one of the last golden age relics is gone. Just turned 104 a couple of weeks ago too. RIP to an acting legend, her performances in The Snake Pit and The Heiress are incredible. 

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2 hours ago, eitam said:

I spent the last few years in awe of the simple fact that a movie star from the 1930s (and incidently the star from 1938's Robin Hood which I watched a lot in my childhood) was still living among us. So now it is over. 

RIP madame de Havilland

 

This.

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I've never seen any movies she was in but that's awesome she lived for so long.  I wonder if she had any interesting perspective on the golden age of Hollywood compared to modern Hollywood

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I have the impression she led an interesting life. I see that several biographies have been published in recent years - could anybody recommend one of those?

 

Also, is there a good webstore for purchasing classic films on region 2 blu-ray? I find amazon's selection to be rather inadequate.

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Damn, born during WWI. Feels strange when these events so talked about and these movies so popular and widely accessible and rewatched are passing out of living memory (not that she would have had memories of WWI but you know what I mean)... probably a couple decades later than many thought they would.

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What an amazing life and career. 104 is insanely good innings. Born during World War 1 and living all the way through corona crises and Tik Tok, how about that?

 

Let's not forget she appeared in a Williams-scored film, THE SCREAMING WOMAN. Well, it had a Williams THEME, at least.

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3 minutes ago, Jurassic Shark said:

And stock music by Jerry Goldsmith, among others. Interesting.

 

Yes, and Morton Stevens, if memory serves? There was a musician's strike at the time, so that explains the library music. But where Williams' end credits theme comes from, is still a mystery. Surely, he wasn't a 'strikebreaker', and if the piece was composed for something else, he wouldn't have received his own 'theme' credit. Bizarre.

 

But crazy to think that Olivia de Havilland was already in her 60s when she did this film in 1972, and she was still with us up untill recently.

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