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Yeah, this is indisputable. And well-justified too, given the strong linkage of the Barber adagio with Kennedy -- both as a piece he personally admired and one that was indelibly linked with his memor

Same key, same violin figurations, similar harp, and a woodwind melody centered around the fifth degree of the scale…

Don't mean to be argumentative, but that simply isn't the case. Barber's Adagio was and remains closely associated with the JFK assassination, and was played on the radio very shortly after his death

I mean all I can really hear is brass melodies with strong intervals of 4th/5ths based on the harmonic series... which is entirely idiosyncratic or brass instruments considering the fact that they were literally designed to sound good doing so.

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7 hours ago, Thor said:

Enlighten us noobs, please! I can't hear any similarity between SILVERADO and JURASSIC PARK other than that they're both orchestral.

 

Spot on!

 

21 minutes ago, Jay said:

Am I really the first one to point out he put Quess instead of Guess in the thread title?

 

You're the first one who felt the need to point it out. ;)

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On 8/14/2020 at 3:19 PM, Thor said:

Enlighten us noobs, please! I can't hear any similarity between SILVERADO and JURASSIC PARK other than that they're both orchestral.

 

Afair, it was (or was rumored to be) the temp track for the island arrival scene, just like the Henry V piece for the ailing dinosaur scene.

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2 hours ago, Gruesome Son of a Bitch said:

Silverado, a score I've only ever heard playing on the muzak at Disney.

 

Muzak? That's some challenging muzak, because a lot of the score is quite abrasive. But it's a great one; a big operatic western score, and among Broughton's very best. But I've never ever thought there was any similarity to JURASSIC PARK.

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7 hours ago, QuartalHarmony said:

Listening to JFK just now, I’m struck by the similarities between Arlington and Barber’s Adagio for Strings. Anyone else?

 

Mark

Nah.

Just the general feel. Maybe.

 

That one should be pretty obvious.

That Italian guy sings pretty good, dontcha think?😉

 

 

0:55-

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8 minutes ago, Falstaft said:

 

 

I've also always been struck by the affinity between this cue from Jaws and the mysterious coda at the end of Vaughan Williams's Second Symphony. It's not the only place in the Jaws score that seems to draw from that coda (the end of "Preparing the Cage" too). And Goldsmith also drew a lot from this piece, and RVW more generally, esp. in Alien

 

 

 

And the Calm Sea theme in Jaws also greatly reminds of the very first minutes of the same symphony

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1 hour ago, bruce marshall said:

Charles Ives " The Unanswered Question" is the piece associated with Kennedy. It played at his funeral iirc

 

Don't mean to be argumentative, but that simply isn't the case. Barber's Adagio was and remains closely associated with the JFK assassination, and was played on the radio very shortly after his death on CBS radio, and repeatedly thereafter (though not at his funeral itself, as is sometimes erroneously stated).

 

Ives was at that point still not a widely known or widely performed figure outside of composer circles, and "The Unanswered Question" in particular only became a standard repertory item after the 1970s, largely thanks to Leonard Bernstein's advocacy.

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1 hour ago, bruce marshall said:

Pretty sure Bernstein conducted it at a memorial for JFK.

 

To the best of my knowledge, the famous televised Bernstein performance in memoriam of JFK was Mahler 2, not Ives. (Source: NYPhil). You can actually watch it on youtube:

 

 

But Bernstein conducted a lot, so maybe there's something I'm missing. Curious what you turn up.

 

To return to the original purpose of this thread, here's another potential source of inspiration for another 1993 score.

 

 

I'm not certain that much of Schindler's List was actively tracked with anything. (Well, besides the obvious Kilar "Exodus" for "Schindler's Workforce"...). In this case, I imagine it's more that to prepare to write the score, Williams immersed himself in this idiom, and perhaps this particular album, as a way of getting into the desired sound-world. And maybe even this particular track, whose orchestrations, melodic & harmonic gestures, and especially cadential formulas remind me of "Remembrances" quite a lot. And the Oyfn Pripetshik lullaby of course appeared in the score & soundtrack in different forms too. 

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7 hours ago, bruce marshall said:

Pretty sure Bernstein conducted it at a memorial for JFK.

 

 

( fyi I recently got a documentary about LB. Maybe it will answer the question😊)

No answers from the doc " Larger than Life".

There is a short clip of him conducting the Mahler second!

 

Suggestion:

Merge this thread with the " JW PLAGIARIZING" thread.

They pretty much cover the same ground.

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The talk of the women's choir in ESB on another thread reminded me: Arrival at Cloud City was surely temped with the latter part of Neptune from Holst's Planets, right down to the female wordless choir.

 

Also, the Imperial March - temped with Montagues and Capulets from Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet ballet music? It's certainly about the right length to cover the initial sequence of the Imperial Fleet massing.

 

Mark

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All this talk of ESB and temp tracks rang a vague bell, so I dug out my ancient copy of Once Upon a Galaxy: a journal of the making of the Empire Strikes Back by Alan Arnold. In it, Arnold talks of visiting Irvin Kershner just as he was choosing records to take to the temp track session. Here's one interesting passage:

 

'Behind me, Kersh had begun to rummage, picking out one LP* after another from the shelves that framed the stereo, He played only bits of them, and as the pace of his selections grew more frenzied my musical senses were treated to a most unfeeling assault. In the space on minutes he had played and rejected snatches from Stravinsky and Shostakovich, Hindemith and Copland, Prokofiev and Bliss.' [p249]

 

* note for younger readers: an LP is what we used to called an album on vinyl. 30cm diameter, 33rpm, total playing time about 40 minutes. Blimey, I feel old.

 

Later, as they're driving to the session:

 

'As we turned a corner, one record slipped from the pile and I saw that it was the Prokofiev score for Eistenstein's film October.' [p250]

 

Only problem is, Prokofiev didn't write a score for Eisenstein's October: ten days that shook the world (1928)! It was a silent film, although Shostakovitch wrote a score for it in 1966 which he then repurposed as a tone poem (Op. 131). Listening to the tone poem, there are bits that possibly could have been used to temp action/battle scenes (about 3 to 5 minutes in, for example), or the last couple of minutes could perhaps have temped the escape from Cloud City.

 

Anyone know any more?

 

Mark

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