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Christopher Young


GerateWohl
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Jurassic Shark asked me to post some highlights of Chris Young's oevre. Here they are.

 

 

 

I guess he is mainly known for writing remarkable scores for B-movies like Species or Hellraiser. He die also some Blockbuster stuff, but not always that interesting. Even though some of his pieces have often been used in trailers. My favorite score of his is Murder in the First. 

Additions? Oppinions?

 

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14 hours ago, karelm said:

I dig this thread.  He loves Herrmann, Goldsmith, and worships JW in a Zimmer way.  This is a quote from Zimmer and Chris would echo it: "He's the greatest film composer out there, without a doubt, and it happens to be one of his iconic pieces of music, so I spent three months just procrastinating and not even getting a start on the thing, because I was so intimidated: 'Oh my God, I'm following in John Williams' footsteps.'" (Zimmer was talking about Superman).  Chris said the same which I'll paraphrase "My god, any composer's dream is to create that one theme people just can't get out of their head and he did it over and over". 
 

Yes, since you mention it, there are really big similarities in the music of Chris Young and Hans Zimmer, even though Chris Young at least from time to time has themes. I don'T want to start bashing Zimmer here. I am sure that Zimmer mostly dispenses on themes on purpose. So, no issue with that. But a quote from John Powel on John Williams brought after their collaboration on Solo brought it really to the point (if I remember it correctly): "He really writes polyphonic music. Nobody does that anymore. Composers today rather work like songwriters." And in my simple words I understand it this way, that today film composers mostly start with a sequence of chords and put a melody on it. John Williams actually starts with the melody and afterwards put dozens of chords under it what ever might be required for the current scene mood or whatever. And everyone admires that. So, why does hardly anyone work like that anymore then? 

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22 hours ago, GerateWohl said:

Yes, since you mention it, there are really big similarities in the music of Chris Young and Hans Zimmer, even though Chris Young at least from time to time has themes. I don'T want to start bashing Zimmer here. I am sure that Zimmer mostly dispenses on themes on purpose. So, no issue with that. But a quote from John Powel on John Williams brought after their collaboration on Solo brought it really to the point (if I remember it correctly): "He really writes polyphonic music. Nobody does that anymore. Composers today rather work like songwriters." And in my simple words I understand it this way, that today film composers mostly start with a sequence of chords and put a melody on it. John Williams actually starts with the melody and afterwards put dozens of chords under it what ever might be required for the current scene mood or whatever. And everyone admires that. So, why does hardly anyone work like that anymore then? 

The simple answer is directors don't ask for it.  I once scored a project and for the opening scene gave a theme.  They said it had too many notes, reduce the notes.  So I simplified and they wanted it simpler still.  By the end, it was just a drone and they loved it!  If directors want themes, they'll get themes.  One of the biggest reasons why directors don't want themes so much is they do a lot more drop ins...like the composer gives them quite a few options and they'll drop it in where it feels right to them rather than having the composer score to the scene (*cough* Chris Nolan *cough*).  In effect, they're getting a more generic score that lets them have more flexibility around placement and use which they'll then edit.  Second, more films are concerned with momentum (tempo and rhythm) then melody to keep you from surfing the web or flipping channels so you get faster tempos and scoring throughout (*cough* Chris Nolan *cough*) and these are what modern directors expect a good score sounds like so that's what they ask for.

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1 hour ago, karelm said:

The simple answer is directors don't ask for it.  I once scored a project and for the opening scene gave a theme.  They said it had too many notes, reduce the notes.  So I simplified and they wanted it simpler still.  By the end, it was just a drone and they loved it!  If directors want themes, they'll get themes.  One of the biggest reasons why directors don't want themes so much is they do a lot more drop ins...like the composer gives them quite a few options and they'll drop it in where it feels right to them rather than having the composer score to the scene (*cough* Chris Nolan *cough*).  In effect, they're getting a more generic score that lets them have more flexibility around placement and use which they'll then edit.  Second, more films are concerned with momentum (tempo and rhythm) then melody to keep you from surfing the web or flipping channels so you get faster tempos and scoring throughout (*cough* Chris Nolan *cough*) and these are what modern directors expect a good score sounds like so that's what they ask for.

What you write makes absolutely sense. Ok. So much for the art of musical storytelling.

I remember watching a documentary about film scoring and they showed a scene from E.T. and the commenting lady said, see in that scene how much room Spielberg gives to the music. And I though, yes, that's probably it. It does not just depend on the composer also on the director. Anyway, I remember watching some Spielberg movies, where I though, he just made the movie to let JW write some music to it. Hook was for me the perfect example. Or in a way the Indiana Jones sequels. Since films visually are less depending on music to lift up the pictures they often dispense on it in a way. 

The biggest effect of film music that I can remember was at watching the first "planet of the Apes" for the second time. At the scene in the forrest when the ape riders apear first chasing the humans I thought, without music you would just see a ridicilously costumed group of people running between trees. But the music managed to create an illusion of other-worldliness.

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On 9/14/2020 at 5:28 PM, GerateWohl said:

Yes, since you mention it, there are really big similarities in the music of Chris Young and Hans Zimmer, even though Chris Young at least from time to time has themes. I don'T want to start bashing Zimmer here. I am sure that Zimmer mostly dispenses on themes on purpose. So, no issue with that. But a quote from John Powel on John Williams brought after their collaboration on Solo brought it really to the point (if I remember it correctly): "He really writes polyphonic music. Nobody does that anymore. Composers today rather work like songwriters." And in my simple words I understand it this way, that today film composers mostly start with a sequence of chords and put a melody on it. John Williams actually starts with the melody and afterwards put dozens of chords under it what ever might be required for the current scene mood or whatever. And everyone admires that. So, why does hardly anyone work like that anymore then? 

 

They can't. 

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  • 3 months later...
2 hours ago, Matt C said:

I've been on a Young kick recently.

 

Listening to his two Monkey King scores -- just beautiful and rowdy in a fun way.

I like both although second one is to me bit better. In fact it might be my favourite Christopher Young album.

 

Karol

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  • 4 months later...
Quote

Christopher Young to Score Oliver Park’s ‘Abyzou’ & Erlingur Thoroddsen’s ‘The Piper’

Christopher Young (Hellraiser, Spider-Man 3, The Hurricane, Sinister, The Exorcism of Emily Rose, The Shipping News, Drag Me to Hell) has revealed during a recent composer panel hosted by Dread Central that he is currently composing the music for the upcoming horror thriller Abyzou. The film is directed by Oliver Park and stars Nick Blood, Emm Wiseman, Allan Corduner, Paul Kaye, Daniel Ben Zenou and Jodie Jacobs. The film is set in a Hasidic community and follows a family struggling with unresolved trauma which finds itself at the mercy of an ancient demon bent on destroying them from the inside. Hank Hoffman wrote the screenplay based on a story by himself & Jonathan Yunger. Yunger is producing the Millennium Media production with Jeffrey Greenstein (The Outpost, Security), Les Weldon (The Expendables series, The Hitman’s Bodyguard) and Yariv Lerner (Angel Has Fallen, Hellboy). Abyzou is currently in post-production. No word yet on a release date.

 

Young is also attached to score another Millennium films production, The Piper written and directed by Erlingur Thoroddsen. The horror movie follows a young composer who is given the opportunity of a lifetime when she is tasked with finishing her late mentor’s concerto, but soon discovers that playing the music summons deadly consequences. Yunger, Weldon, Greenstein and Lerner are producing the project with Bernard Kira and Tanner Mobley. No production start date has been announced yet.

http://filmmusicreporter.com/2021/05/19/christopher-young-to-score-oliver-parks-abyzou-erlingur-thoroddsens-the-piper/

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On 9/16/2020 at 6:17 AM, Koray Savas said:

Underrated film score right here. 

Just acquired this!

Love the new age/ambient vibe. Much superior to GOTHIC.

 

Bat-21 also has that dreamy synth feel I like.

 

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