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Jerry Goldsmith's THE LAST CASTLE (2001) - Intrada 2020


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The age-old discussion. I can picture you sitting in a basement on New Year's 1999. Complete darkness, but you hoist your fist against the flickering lights of the television screen which shows the wh

There's this somewhat funny Richard Kraft recount how Goldsmith got this job. Sadly it was a lousy picture, but it makes you aware of how insecure JG was even after all his accomplishments (at the tai

What a great listen. I've met both Doug and @Yavar Moradi (on separate occasions and for different reasons), so hearing those two wax lyrical and in depth is quite a treat.   Here, photograp

I remember seeing this film in theaters. 

 

I don't remember the score, except wasn't one of the cues renamed to be about 9/11?

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11 minutes ago, Jay said:

I remember seeing this film in theaters. 

 

I don't remember the score, except wasn't one of the cues renamed to be about 9/11

Yes. Yavar would know the full details on that! 

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It's not anything substantial, a rare James Horner-like score for JG, in that it really just finetunes all his prior jingoisms and military licks into something that is basically a pastiche. As fan of Goldsmith horn and trumpet writing it's a treat, though. It recycles Rambo III and given how badly that sounds, here at least it sounds brilliantly.

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I watched the awful film, but never owned the score. From what I've heard in the film it is one of his least original scores, but I kinda like the Rambo III-like melancholy that infiltrates the military music. Still much better than Along Came a Spider from the same year. I think, I'll buy it.

 

And the other release there is pretty exciting too. Might be the first Horner CD for me to get. How much unreleased stuff will be on there?

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There's this somewhat funny Richard Kraft recount how Goldsmith got this job. Sadly it was a lousy picture, but it makes you aware of how insecure JG was even after all his accomplishments (at the tail-end of his career).

 

https://perspectiveforum.net/2017/01/22/true-confession-taking-giant-risk-jerry-goldsmith/

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I've seen the film, but I have no memory of it whatsoever. Doesn't bode well. I think I sampled the Goldsmith score once upon a time, but it didn't do anything for me - like most of his 2000s work. Take that for what it's worth.

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I’ll get it because it’s Goldsmith and even his lesser efforts usually have some merit but this isn’t one that ever massively excites me. I always thought of it in the same group as The Sum Of All Fears (or its maths based sequel, the fear of all sums...) but TSOAF being more engaging and with a much stronger title track with the soprano soloist.

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5 hours ago, crocodile said:

It's payday on Tuesday so will probably get both. :)

 

Karol

 

What about food?

 

12 minutes ago, Tom Guernsey said:

the fear of all sums

 

:peepwall:

 

4 minutes ago, Thor said:

 

The age-old discussion. I can picture you sitting in a basement on New Year's 1999. Complete darkness, but you hoist your fist against the flickering lights of the television screen which shows the whole world celebrating, while you shout: "Damn you, World! You're one year early!". :D

 

And you keep saying you aren't funny!

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4 minutes ago, publicist said:

The Sum of All Fears is fine. The Last Castle and Along came a Spider are probably the least ones, all things considered.

I’d go with that. To be fair the films were pretty generic action/thrillers so it’s not a great surprise he wasn’t super inspired. Shame he didn’t have some ongoing collaborators later in his career to give him the opportunities he deserved. 

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Goldsmith and Horner were pretty much alike in that regard, though Goldsmith was certainly the greater composer. But given how much Horner craved the Williams spotlight (and was a much better self-promoter than JG) it's somehow ironic how he also kind of got lost in his later career. There's some elusive golden boy thing in guys like Zimmer and Williams that hasn't got anything to do with musical talent.

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They are indeed. The rejected TIMELINE is OK too, but not something I'd ike to keep. As with all the other post-2000 Goldsmith efforts, I've deleted them or sold them. For me, Goldsmith basically retired in 1999. On a high.

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12 hours ago, publicist said:

Goldsmith and Horner were pretty much alike in that regard, though Goldsmith was certainly the greater composer. But given how much Horner craved the Williams spotlight (and was a much better self-promoter than JG) it's somehow ironic how he also kind of got lost in his later career.

I don't want to divert the discussion on Intrada's latest Goldsmith release, but I'm always eager to hear more about these kinds of professional relationships and strivings. Maybe you know of a thread or two I can head over to?

 

12 hours ago, publicist said:

There's some elusive golden boy thing in guys like Zimmer and Williams that hasn't got anything to do with musical talent.

With Zimmer, absolutely. I'll never understand why so many people continue to fawn over him. At least JW earned and deserves his top-rank reputation, every last inch of it and then plenty more.

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INTRADA Announces:

 

Image Image

 

THE LAST CASTLE
Music Composed and Conducted by JERRY GOLDSMITH
INTRADA ISC 451

 

Intrada's latest release features an expanded edition of Jerry Goldsmith's score from the 2001 Paramount Pictures film The Last Castle, courtesy of both Paramount and Universal Music Group. Goldsmith was no novice at scoring military-themed features, having scored the early '60s A Gathering of Eagles early in his career through to Executive Decision in the mid-'90s. Goldsmith's fondness for solo trumpet was a hallmark of this military sound, a masculine sound that could represent the military aspect of a character (most notably in scores like Lonely Are the Brave and First Blood). It's a sound he employed generously in The Last Castle, capturing prisoner General Irwin's past glories as well as his competence at inspiring his fellow inmates. The trumpet is performed here by Malcolm McNab, who also contributes a few thoughts to the album's liner notes. It is a brass dominated score, but that's not to say woodwinds are not given their due for moments requiring more sympathy. It was Goldsmith's last full-blown military score.

 

To present the complete score for The Last Castle, Paramount provided Intrada with access to the complete scoring session elements. Originally recorded on 48-track digital tape, veteran scoring mixer Bruce Botnik had created both 5.1 film mixes and two-channel stereo mixes. Both were used in assembling the 2-CD set, which features the complete film score on disc one, followed by several unused alternates. Disc two features the Goldsmith-supervised classical source music, including the Salieri "Concerto for Oboe, Violin, Cello and Orchestra in D Major," courtesy of Naxos Music. This is followed by a remastered presentation of the original Decca album program.

 

The film tells the tale of conflict between the warden of a military prison and a revered general, imprisoned there, who eventually earns the respect of the prisoners and leads a revolt against the cruel, petty prison commander. Robert Redford plays the general and James Gandolfini the jail warden.

 

INTRADA ISC 451
Barcode: 720258545107
Retail Price: $29.99
Starts Shipping October 27th
Note: Due to local restrictions related to the pandemic, shipping time may be slower than usual
For track listing and sound samples, please visit http://store.intrada.com/s.nl/it.A/id.12180/.f

 

LastCastleANIM.gif

 

TheLastCastle_isc451_600c.jpg

 

Quote

THE LAST CASTLE (2CD)
Jerry Goldsmith
Label: Intrada Special Collection Volume ISC 451
Film Date: 2001
Album Date: 2020
Time: 2:19:16
Tracks: 46
Price: $29.99

 

Expanded and remastered Jerry Goldsmith soundtrack on 2 CDs! Dreamworks Pictures presents, Rod Lurie directs, Robert Redford, James Gandolfini, Mark Ruffalo, Clifton Collins Jr., Delroy Lindo star. A clash of wills, a test of strength… behind bars! Gandolfini is the military prison warden, Redford the new inmate with a twist: he’s also a decorated general, not accustomed to following but leading, now a fallen hero just doing his time. Before long his ideals put him in conflict with the warden’s and the other prisoners find themselves “pawns” in a giant chess game with their lives at stake. The chess metaphor (note the film’s title) anchors the increasingly dangerous game playing out between the two protagonists. An all-out battle looms ahead. 

 

Complex film had the misfortune of being completed just as the terrible events of September 11, 2001 took place. The impact affected the mood and outcome of the film itself with the American flag as a centerpiece. In fact, Jerry Goldsmith completed his score close to the terror attacks and named his primary theme, “September 11, 2001”. The incredibly moving, solemn minor-key theme plays typically on solo trumpet, scored by the composer for ace trumpeter Malcolm McNab, who contributes a personalized paragraph in the booklet notes specifically for this release. But the score offers much more: as conflicts build, Goldsmith increases the tension as well. War does come and Goldsmith attacks with his unique brand of ferocious, percussive action writing. 

 

New Intrada 2-CD set presents Goldsmith’s full score with numerous previously unreleased cues, all taken from the original 3-channel digital stereo session mixes, culminating in the lengthy, climactic “Battle For The Castle”  (composed by Mark McKenzie), also being released for the first time. Here aggressive staccato rhythms and orchestral punctuation mark the violent confrontation.  Still more action hits with Goldsmith’s “Hold Them” and “Taking Command”. No matter how intense or exciting the score should become, listeners will always find the ever-noble, ever-expressive sound of Malcolm McNab and his golden trumpet taking the spotlight. Several alternates also appear as well as three versions of the climactic “The Flag” sequence. CD 2 presents the classical music (which the warden sometimes listens to), conducted and/or supervised by Jerry Goldsmith as well as a remastered presentation of the original Decca album as prepared by Bruce Botnick. Kay Marshall designs dramatic package, Jeff Bond contributes notes, Mark McKenzie orchestrates, Bruce Botnick engineers, Jerry Goldsmith composes & conducts. Intrada Special Collection 2-CD set available while quantities and interest remain!

 

TRACK LIST

 

CD 1

 

Complete Score
01. The Castle (1:39)
02. Irwin Arrives (2:12)
03. The Cell Block (1:00)
04. My Turn (1:02)
05. Rain (2:02)
06. The Rock Pile (4:58)
07. My Mission (Original) (1:41)
08. No Wall (0:53)
09. The Dog Tags (1:03)
10. Let’s Go Ladies (2:36)
11. The Salute (1:08)
12. Winter’s Report (0:42)
13. Full Alert (2:51)
14. Fading Away (1:16)
15. Military Justice (2:18)
16. The Count Down/Hold Them (4:07)
17. Taking Command (3:37)
18. Battle For The Castle (6:22)
19. Fall In (2:38)
20. The Flag (Revised No. 2) (7:00)
21. September 11, 2001 Theme From The Last Castle (2:41)

Total Score Time: 54:45

 

The Extras
22. The Cell Block (Alternate) (1:00)
23. My Mission (Alternate) (1:43)
24. The Count Down/Hold Them (Early Take) (4:06)
25. The Flag (Original) (6:55)
26. The Flag (Revised No. 1) (5:48)
Total Extras Time: 19:43


CD 1 Total Time: 74:35

 

 

CD 2

 

Classical Source Music – Conducted / Supervised By Jerry Goldsmith
01. Symphony No. 40 In G Minor, K. 550 (1:00) (Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart) (Movement II, Andante)
02. Piano Sonata In C Major, K. 545 (2:36) (Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart) (Movement II, Andante)
03. Piano Sonata In B-Flat Major, K. 570 (0:49) (Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart) (Movement III, Allegretto)
04. Goldberg Variations, BWV 988, Variation 3 (3:42) (Johann Sebastian Bach)
05. Goldberg Variations, BWV 988, Variation 7 (Long) (2:41) (Johann Sebastian Bach)
06. Goldberg Variations, BWV 988, Variation 7 (Short) (1:07) (Johann Sebastian Bach)
Source Music Supervised By Jerry Goldsmith Time: 12:05

 

07. Concerto For Oboe, Violin, Cello And Orchestra In D Major (Antonio Salieri) (Movement 1) (9:14)

 

Original Decca Soundtrack Album
08. The Castle (1:32)
09. Irwin Arrives (2:11)
10. The Rock Pile (4:58)
11. Get Behind The Mule (Performed By John Hammond) (5:51)
12. Let’s Go Ladies (3:35)
13. Full Alert (2:51)
14. Military Justice (3:17)
15. The Count Down (2:19)
16. Hold Them (1:48)
17. Taking Command (3:31)
18. The Flag (5:49)
19. September 11, 2001 – Theme From The Last Castle (2:40)
20. Chiseled In Stone (Performed by Dead Hall) (3:45)
Original Album Time: 43:06


 CD 2 Total Time: 64:41

 

http://store.intrada.com/s.nl/it.A/id.12180/.f

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The Intrada forum post says

 

Quote

Originally recorded on 48-track digital tape, veteran scoring mixer Bruce Botnik had created both 5.1 film mixes and two-channel stereo mixes.

 

While the Intrada main page says

 

Quote

New Intrada 2-CD set presents Goldsmith’s full score with numerous previously unreleased cues, all taken from the original 3-channel digital stereo session mixes

 

Why the discrepancy?  Was it 2 channel or 3 channel?

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I really like the elegiac and military nature of the score - I will definitely buy this at some point, knowing that it's not a piece of high art, but a guilty pleasure for me as a fan of Goldsmith on auto-pilot.

 

Can anybody tell me which cues weren't composed by Goldsmith except The Battle for the Castle?

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The press release already said that

On 10/26/2020 at 8:00 PM, Jay said:

culminating in the lengthy, climactic “Battle For The Castle”  (composed by Mark McKenzie)

 

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Then you interpreted it correctly.

 

I think, the activity in this thread reflects the popularity of the score. Even those who know it are not overly enthusiastic and eagerly waiting to hold the new release their hands.

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2 hours ago, John Chambers said:

 

 

What a great listen. I've met both Doug and @Yavar Moradi (on separate occasions and for different reasons), so hearing those two wax lyrical and in depth is quite a treat.

 

Here, photographical proof of those meetings (I don't get to name-drop all that often!):

P1020750.jpg100_4191.jpg 

 

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Does Doug wear that hat every day?

He was wearing it when I saw him at Townson's Halloween concert in LA

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I believe that's also because he's from a military family (a show of respect and remembrance to his father, I believe? Don't quote me on this, but that's the general angle).

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On 10/31/2020 at 9:15 AM, Brundlefly said:

I really like the elegiac and military nature of the score - I will definitely buy this at some point, knowing that it's not a piece of high art, but a guilty pleasure for me as a fan of Goldsmith on auto-pilot.

 

While The Last Castle is far from the most original score to come from Goldsmith's pen (the main theme obviously owes a huge debt to Rambo III in particular), I don't think it's fair to call it a "guilty pleasure" or put down its artistic qualities. If you read this remembrance by Jerry's agent Richard Kraft, you'll discover that Jerry actually really cared about this project and certainly would not have tackled it "on auto-pilot":
https://perspectiveforum.net/2017/01/22/true-confession-taking-giant-risk-jerry-goldsmith/

The music itself is not some surface level action thing like US Marshals, but actually plumbs some depths in terms of introspection and character, because Jerry connected with the film. I'm grateful to @John Chambers for sharing a link to the podcast I recorded with Doug last week -- I think it shows the score in a good light and my editor Jens made an effort to focus on previously-unreleased cues in terms of what music to include. The previously-unreleased music actually fleshes out this score quite a bit.

 

Yavar

 

P.S. Kuhni, do you remember where we were when we took that photo? (And who took it? My mind is so foggy I'm afraid...)

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4 hours ago, Yavar Moradi said:

P.S. Kuhni, do you remember where we were when we took that photo? (And who took it? My mind is so foggy I'm afraid...)

 

Jon Broxton took that photo. We went to see Star Trek that day, went to Amoeba (with TJ), and in the evening the three of us went to, I believe, Burbank for dinner in a place you recommended (I had lemonade as pink as my shirt that day and an awesome burger)...and you introduced Jett Hitt's Yellowstone to both Jon and I on our drive home that evening. The photo was taken in a plaza close to where that restaurant was.

 

Only eleven years ago. :blink:

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3 minutes ago, Kühni said:

 

Jon Broxton took that photo. We went to see Star Trek that day, went to Amoeba (with TJ), and in the evening the three of us went to, I believe, Burbank for dinner in a place you recommended (I had lemonade as pink as my shirt that day and an awesome burger)...and you introduced Jett Hitt's Yellowstone to both Jon and I on our drive home that evening. The photo was taken in a plaza close to where that restaurant was.

 

Only eleven years ago. :blink:

 

Your memory is astonishing. Must be that German precision. 

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