Jump to content

New JW Interview on Die Welt (in german)


TownerFan
 Share

Recommended Posts

Cool! It's a little small to read properly, but it's mostly the standard questions and replies, from what I can glean. If I had the time and a better scan, I might be able to translate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The better scan is included right there. You just have to zoom in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I tried, but can't zoom in long enough. It's still relatively small.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try right click - view image, then ctrl+scroll.

 

I can remember just enough German to tell that yes, these are not the most new and original questions, but little enough that I'd miss words that change the meaning of a sentence from agreement to denial or something, so I'll leave it to others.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You had me for a minute, crumbs! :lol:

 

Anyway, thanks so much for taking the chore of manually translating this! Much appreciated. Some nice comments from JW here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, crumbs said:

It looks like part of the interview got cropped off underneath the photo. I could only find this low res version via their online portal:

q8AFJFu.jpg

 

Is John Williams joking or real?

He was asked about new releases of his older works in near future.

 

He said he just approved a 30 disc set of Star Wars, 15 CDs of Indiana Jones and 4 discs from Hook inclusive the abandoned Musical which he had recorded completely but told nobody before. And he approved the score to Sugarland Expres, The Rare Breed and Story of a Woman because he find it not too bad. And a new expansion from Heartbeeps, which he compares with Beethoven 5th.

 

I think he is joking.

 

EDIT: Never mind. Good take crumbs!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, ckappes said:

He said he just approved a 30 disc set of Star Wars, 15 CDs of Indiana Jones and 4 discs from Hook inclusive the abandoned Musical which he had recorded completely but told nobody before. And he approved the score to Sugarland Expres, The Rare Breed and Story of a Woman because he find it not too bad. And a new expansion from Heartbeeps, which he compares with Beethoven 5th.

 

I think he is joking.

 

I'm sure he's dead serious!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Thor said:

Cool! It's a little small to read properly, 

 

4 hours ago, Holko said:

The better scan is included right there. You just have to zoom in.

 

4 hours ago, Thor said:

I tried, but can't zoom in long enough. It's still relatively small.

 

 

On this forum, you have to click on a picture one to get the larger version, THEN CLICK ON IT AGAIN to get the fully-full-sized version in its own tab, that you can then zoom into all you want.


Remember: Two clicks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great interview! But of course when it comes to minute details, caution is advised in taking everything verbatim... like him calling Wagner "God the Father", which crumbs has translated from the article's "Gottvater", which itself seems to be a mistranslation on the journalist's part of "Godfather", which means something slightly different ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

At least half of the answers in that interview (not counting crumbs' little addendum) don't really sound like Williams to me. And not just like very liberal translations into German either. More like they interviewed him and then took the gist of his answers and wrote their own original German version. Which makes me wonder how much we can trust the few new insights that are not part of his usual set of answers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, Marian Schedenig said:

At least half of the answers in that interview (not counting crumbs' little addendum) don't really sound like Williams to me. And not just like very liberal translations into German either. More like they interviewed him and then took the gist of his answers and wrote their own original German version. Which makes me wonder how much we can trust the few new insights that are not part of his usual set of answers.

Something about this translation is really weird and amateurish. What about "With a two-tone bass ostinato that gives a plastic monster danger." WTF is plastic monster danger? Is that a thing?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, MaxTheHouseelf said:

Something about this translation is really weird and amateurish. What about "With a two-tone bass ostinato that gives a plastic monster danger." WTF is plastic monster danger? Is that a thing?

 

That's Google Translate for you. You will always get bizarre phrasings.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, MaxTheHouseelf said:

Something about this translation is really weird and amateurish. What about "With a two-tone bass ostinato that gives a plastic monster danger." WTF is plastic monster danger? Is that a thing?

 

The German sentence checks out as a sentence. But it doesn't strike me as something William would say in response to a question about writing music for gas chamber scenes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, MaxTheHouseelf said:

WTF is plastic monster danger? Is that a thing?

No, danger is the object of that sentence, so the motof gives danger to the plastic monster. Makes a sometimes kinda weak prop scary. It's comprehensible even if not perfect.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Thor said:

 

That's Google Translate for you. You will always get bizarre phrasings.

Google Translate is often hit or missed

Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, Marian Schedenig said:

At least half of the answers in that interview (not counting crumbs' little addendum) don't really sound like Williams to me. And not just like very liberal translations into German either. More like they interviewed him and then took the gist of his answers and wrote their own original German version. Which makes me wonder how much we can trust the few new insights that are not part of his usual set of answers.

This is what I thought as well, when I read the interview.

16 minutes ago, Thor said:

 

That's Google Translate for you. You will always get bizarre phrasings.

But that applies to the German text as well. I hope Die Welt didn't use Google translate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, Thor said:

That's Google Translate for you. You will always get bizarre phrasings.

The german sentence makes no sense either. I thought the translation by @crumbs was already pretty accurate, but the german translation itself is not right.

 

16 minutes ago, Holko said:

No, danger is the object of that sentence, so the motof gives danger to the plastic monster. Makes a sometimes kinda weak prop scary. It's comprehensible even if not perfect.

I understand what is meant but it's still phrased weirdly.

 

18 minutes ago, Marian Schedenig said:

The German sentence checks out as a sentence. But it doesn't strike me as something William would say in response to a question about writing music for gas chamber scenes.

Yeah, the transition makes no sense.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's very odd interview. Williams seems to be unusual honest. Despite he did not say opinion on contemporary film music. I'm curious about that. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Online translation does have a habit of making people sound extremely blunt and matter-of-fact so I wouldn't read much into the unusual honesty. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Darth Mulder said:

It's very odd interview. Williams seems to be unusual honest. Despite he did not say opinion on contemporary film music. I'm curious about that. 

Well, no answer is actually an answer. I'm quite sure he doesn't like it. Otherwise he would have said things like "Oh, I enjoy a lot of it. Especially....".

 

On the other hand, he doesn't watch movies and doesn't listen to music much. How can he have an opinion about something he hasn't heard?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm surprised none of the German speaking people here have provided a proper translation. It it had been in Norwegian, I would have shared translation duties with @Thor and gotten it done in half an hour.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, Jurassic Shark said:

I'm surprised none of the German speaking people here have provided a proper translation. It it had been in Norwegian, I would have shared translation duties with @Thor and gotten it done in half an hour.

I can proof-read it later today.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Jurassic Shark said:

I'm surprised none of the German speaking people here have provided a proper translation. It it had been in Norwegian, I would have shared translation duties with @Thor and gotten it done in half an hour.

I actually started it yesterday, but as I saw @crumbstranslation, which was much more fluently written and better in terms of grammar than mine, I didn't go on with it. So it's already pretty accurate I'd say and you definitley understand all the important stuff. There are some small things like

 

21 hours ago, crumbs said:

Have you ever cried in the cinema?
No not true.

... that would be something like "No, not really." or

 

22 hours ago, crumbs said:

Still, you've come back to film. Why?

I had to earn money, I had a wife and children. And in the film business, where my father worked as a drummer in the studio orchestras, I was at home very early. I felt comfortable there as a pianist. You had to be quick, I learned that while watching television in my first years.

I think he wants to say something like..."I learned that in my first years working in the Film/TV industry."

 

But overall its pretty good.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Steve said:

Well, no answer is actually an answer. I'm quite sure he doesn't like it. Otherwise he would have said things like "Oh, I enjoy a lot of it. Especially....".

 

Yeah, I found that an odd response as well. Especially when he previously gushed about the way younger composers are experimenting with "electronics," discovering new textures, all these things he doesn't know how to do.

 

I'm sure he also once cited Out of Africa as a film he wishes he'd scored.

 

I'd say it's just Williams being polite and not wanting to make ripples in the industry. He's been around Hollywood long enough to play the game. He usually conveys what he's thinking through subtext, instead of outwardly stating things (ie. his constant public jabs at TFA's loud SFX, or the way he gushes about Abrams as a person in interviews vs ASM revealing his private dismay at how the last score was utterly butchered).

 

One thing that never changes is his love of the symphony orchestra, the virtuosity they can only achieve when playing together. It's not hard to guess what he thinks of modern film scores which rely on samples, record musicians via striping, then assemble scores in ProTools and process them to sound like SFX more than instruments. He made an impassioned plea back in 2019 about the way 'modern institutions were under threat,' citing the symphony orchestra as an endangered species (or words to that effect).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

https://www.welt.de/kultur/plus227230129/Komponist-John-Williams-Natuerlich-ist-mir-Darth-Vader-am-naechsten.html

 

The online version is behind a paywall, but from what we can get, it seems longer. The printed version was likely condensed.

 

Anyone from Germany with an account there able to check? Thanks in advance!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Jurassic Shark said:

I'm surprised none of the German speaking people here have provided a proper translation. It it had been in Norwegian, I would have shared translation duties with @Thor and gotten it done in half an hour.

I must appologize. I was the whole day off yesterday and I harldy managed to read the interview myself. And I saw the efforts made by the others, so I thought that point is covered. :blink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think it is longer, but anyway here is orderly the German version (via a library access):

Quote

Krieg der Klänge

 

Kaum jemand hat die Filmmusik so sehr geprägt wie John Williams und doch verstehtder Komponist sich ganz als Diener der Bilder. Im Gespräch gibt er intime Einblicke in sein Handwerk und verrät, welche "Star Wars"-Figur ihm am nächsten ist.

 

Als berühmtester lebender Filmkomponist ist der fünffache Oscargewinner John Williams eine Legende. In sieben Jahrzehnten hat er mehr als 100 meist opulente Filmmusikpartituren geschrieben - altmodisch mit der Hand skizziert. Fünf Mal bekam er den Oscar, 52 Mal wurde er nominiert. Im kommenden Jahr wird er 90 Jahre alt. Sehr geerdet ist er im Gespräch, bescheiden und eloquent.

 

WELT AM SONNTAG: Gerade ist meine neunjährige Nichte Emma im totalen "Star Wars"-Rausch. Hätten Sie jemals gedacht, dass der so lange anhält und heute noch die Kinder ansteckt?

 

John Williams: Nein. Bei der Premiere 1977 war das eher was für die Älteren. Inzwischen ist es ja selbst ein Imperium von mehr als 40 Jahren Filmgeschichte. Schlägt das musikalisch zurück?

 

Welche "Star Wars"-Figur und ihr Thema ist Ihnen am nächsten?

 

Natürlich Darth Vader und sein Imperial March. Damit war ich wirklich sehr glücklich, auch wenn diese Musik sich längst verselbständigt hat. Ich mag als Kontrast dazu aber auch das Yoda-Thema sehr, vermindertes B-Dur, das ist ganz einfach, schwebend fast und klar. So wie eben auch diese kleine, weltweise und doch mächtige Vater-Figur. Filmmusik muss einfach und grafisch sein, dann verbindet sie sich am besten mit einem einprägsamen Bild.

 

Stört es Sie aber nicht, wenn Sie eine sehr komplexe Musik komponieren, und die wird dann vom Rausch der Bilder aufgesogen?

 

Es ist doch mein Job, diesen Rausch instrumental zu unterstützen und noch genussvoller zu machen. Am besten mit eingängigen Themen, die trotz der Ablenkung sofort erfassbar sind.

 

Warum sind Sie eigentlich kein klassischer Komponist geworden?

 

Die Ausbildung in Los Angeles bei dem aus Italien emigrierten Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco und an der New Yorker Juilliard School bei der Professorinnenlegende Rosina Lhévinne war doch da. Beide haben mich aber vor allem immer darin bestärkt, meinen eigenen Weg zu gehen. Rosina hat irgendetwas in mir gesehen, deshalb hat sie mich in ihre Klasse aufgenommen. Da waren Leute wie Van Cliburn und Gary Graffman, die später große Klaviervirtuosen wurden. Ich war ein mittelmäßiger Pianist.

 

Trotzdem sind Sie wieder zum Film zurückgekehrt. Warum?

 

Ich musste Geld verdienen, ich hatte Frau und Kinder. Und im Filmgeschäft, wo ja mein Vater als Schlagzeuger in den Studioorchestern gearbeitet hat, war ich schon sehr früh zu Hause. Ich habe mich dort als Pianist wohlgefühlt. Man musste schnell sein, das habe ich in meinen ersten Jahren beim Fernsehen gelernt.

 

Wen haben Sie noch von der alten Filmkomponisten-Garde erlebt?

 

Vor allem Franz Waxman, Alfred Newman und Bernard Herrmann. Sie haben sehr freigiebig ihre Erfahrungen und Ratschläge mit mir jungem Hüpfer geteilt. Benny war der, der mich stets ermutig hat, eigene Musik zu schreiben. Natürlich sind wir nur kleine Leuchten gegen Bach, Beethoven oder Brahms. Und wie natürlich auch gegen Gottvater Wagner, der uns das Leitmotiv beigebracht hat. Meinen ersten "Ring" habe ich übrigens in Hamburg gehört. Wie Wagner heute wohl durch den Musikdschungel der immer noch nicht abgeschlossenen "Star Wars"-Saga geblickt hätte? Bei Herrmann habe ich freilich auch erlebt, wie man seine Karriere durch Sturheit ruinieren kann. Als Filmkomponist hat man zu dienen, fast alles ist irgendwie Kompromiss.

 

Es gibt da keinen John-Williams-Bonus?

 

Nein. In Hollywood zählt Historie wenig. Und am Anfang sind da immer wieder ein beinahe fertiger Film und leere Notenblätter. Dann ist Zeit Geld. Da ist die Industrie gnadenlos, man muss funktionieren. Was ich offenbar ganz gut kann. Bis heute. Von mir wurde jedenfalls noch keine Partitur zurückgewiesen.

 

Haben Sie eigentlich noch einen Überblick, was Sie alles komponiert haben?

 

Nicht wirklich. Ich höre das ja nicht dauernd.

 

Und wenn Ihnen etwas neu Erfundenes bekannt vorkommt, können Sie dann in einem Motivkatalog nachschauen?

 

Gar nicht. Ich bin kein Zettelwirtschaftskomponist wie Beethoven. Es fließt einfach. Und manchmal merke ich auch, dass es zwar gut ist, aber es noch besser werden kann. Das Titelthema zu "Schindlers Liste" zum Beispiel war erst das dritte, dass mich überzeugt hat, aber die anderen beiden habe ich dann auch noch in der Partitur untergebracht. Ein Film, der bis in die Gaskammer vordringt.

 

Schluckt man da nicht als Komponist?

 

Natürlich, aber gerade wegen dieser delikaten Situation ist es natürlich auch ganz handwerklich eine Herausforderung. Und wie vertont man einen hungrigen weißen Hai? Mit einem Zwei-Töne-Bassostinato, das einem Plastikmonster Gefährlichkeit gibt.

 

In Ihren Anfangsjahren in den Hollywood Studios, da muss Ihnen doch auch André Previn begegnet sein?

 

Klar, das war ein cleverer Kerl, drei Jahre älter als ich, der war aus Berlin gekommen, sehr begabt. Durch ihn habe ich viel später seine damalige Frau Anne-Sophie Mutter kennengelernt.

 

Die Sie sicher, sie sammelt ja zeitgenössische Komponisten, gleich nach einem Stück gefragt hat?

 

Klar. Und wenn es nur zehn Takte sind, hat sie gesagt. Ich habe abgewunken, weil ich damals so beschäftigt war. Aber dann kam zu Weihnachten ein wunderschön verpacktes Paket aus München. Da waren deutsche Weihnachtsplätzchen drin.

 

Von ihr! Selbst gebacken?

 

Das nicht, aber sehr lecker und liebevoll. Und dann habe ich, quasi als Dankeschön, ihr das Stück "Markings für Solovioline, Streicher und Harfe" geschickt, immerhin 132 Takte. Und so hat sich dann unser CD-Projekt "Across the Stars" ergeben, und ich bin sogar noch in meinem zarten Alter mit ihr bei den Wiener Philharmonikern angekommen.

 

Wie war das?

 

Ich war ganz klein. Der Goldene Saal im Wiener Musikverein hat wirklich eine gewaltige Aura. Ich bin nach wie vor Stammgast in der herrlichen Symphony Hall in Boston sowie in der Open-Air-Shed in Tanglewood, wo ich ja immerhin 13 Jahre lang als Chefdirigent das Boston Pops Orchestra, die Light-Classics-Formation des Boston Symphony Orchestra geleitet habe. So hatte ich eine gewisse Sicherheit, aber auch einen Kloß im Hals. Die Wiener waren aber unheimlich professionell und sehr lieb. Und schnell habe ich gemerkt, dass sie durch ihre Tagesarbeit als Opernorchester auch sehr flexibel sind und begleiten können müssen. Da sind sie wirklich so reaktionsschnell und stilistisch versatil wie ein Filmorchester.

 

Sie haben ihr ja jetzt sogar doch noch ein Violinkonzert geschrieben, richtig?

 

Ja, Anne-Sophie hat es schon, und wir sind in engem Austausch über ein paar Änderungen. Wenn alles klappt, dann werden wir es im Juli in Tanglewood uraufführen.

 

Dirigieren Sie eigentlich gern?

 

Ja, auch da bin ich ganz pragmatisch reingerutscht. Ich selbst hätte es mir nicht unbedingt zugetraut, aber dann wurde jemand krank, und ich wurde gebeten einzuspringen, weil man mich offenbar dafür geeignet hielt. Das Schöne daran ist, dass ich - da Film immer ein "work in progress" ist - bis zum Ende an meiner Musik dranbleibe, sie direkt vermitteln und meine Intentionen kommunizieren kann. Das ist sehr befriedigend. Und es lässt sich auch auf ein klassisches professionelles Niveau heben, das habe ich dann erleichtert festgestellt, als man mich Ende der Siebziger fragte, ob ich für den kranken Arthur Fiedler in Boston übernehmen könnte. Daraus wurde dann sogar ein fester Job, den ich sehr genossen habe, weil ich wirklich Repertoire interpretieren konnte. Und dann wuchs auch immer mehr die Nachfrage nach meinen eigenen Werken, so habe ich auch mit denen den Kontakt halten dürfen.

 

Haben Sie schon mal im Kino geweint?

 

Nein, nicht wirklich.

 

Macht es einen Unterschied, ob man für einen Blockbuster oder für Netflix komponiert?

 

Nein, denn es muss ja immer passen, zum Thema wie zum Format. Ich habe auch ganz leise, wenig orchestrierte Musiken für große Filme geschrieben.

 

Erzählen Filmmusiken einen geheimen Plot?

 

In der Regel nicht, dafür bleibt beim Verfertigen keine Zeit. Ich hänge da wirklich nur am Bild, am Tempo, an der Schnittsequenz, versuche, vor allem auch einen Rhythmus und eine Balance für jeden Film zu finden. Das ist sehr wichtig.

 

Sind Sie zufrieden mit der Verbreitung Ihrer absoluten Musik?

 

Da tut sich der Betrieb immer noch schwer. Wäre ich nicht beim Film gelandet, hätte ich noch stärker perkussiv, in der Richtung von Edgar Varèse weiterkomponiert. So bin ich polystilistischer geworden. Mein erstes Violinkonzert, das ich als Memento für meine erste Frau komponiert habe, wird ab und an aufgeführt.

 

Aber was glauben Sie, was am meisten gespielt wird?

 

Natürlich das Tuba- und das Fagottkonzert, da gibt es nicht viel Konkurrenz.

 

Gibt es einen Film, dessen Musik Sie gern komponiert hätten?

 

Einige, aber welche, sage ich Ihnen nicht. Genauso wenig, was ich von der heutigen Art der Filmmusik halte. Aber ich sage Ihnen einen Film, für den ich wirklich gern die Musik schreiben wollte und das dann auch getan habe: Rob Marshalls "Die Geisha".

 

Wie würde ein Corona-Film klingen?

 

Darüber habe ich mir zum Glück noch keine Gedanken gemacht. Aber wenn das kommt, dann bin ich sicher auch dafür bereit.

 

Manuel Brug, Welt am Sonntag, 07.03.2021, Nr. 10, S. 45

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

32 minutes ago, GerateWohl said:

I must appologize. I was the whole day off yesterday and I harldy managed to read the interview myself. And I saw the efforts made by the others, so I thought that point is covered. :blink:

 

No need to apologize. :) As someone else pointed out, it's all about the small details which could change the meaning of an answer if not translated correctly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines.