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Cue Naming


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Hi, I'm new and non-English speaker! I browse the forum but couldn't find the info: how does cue naming works ? I refer particularly to things like "1m1", "2m32", etc. I can't understand the logic behind it, because it doesn't seem to refer to sequence or scene numbers or to any timecode. I understand it's a way to list in chronological order the cues, but how does it work exactly ? 

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And then there's things like 4M4R, R for "Revised", or 6M1A, like "Alternate", meaning the cue was changed in some fashion or totally re-written to accommodate a change in the scene's musical needs, or 2M7s, the S usually for a song / source cue. 

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Or "6m3 New New Ending".

 

Or a wholly different lettering like R5P3 (Reel 5 Part(?) 3).

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and some scores are numbered M1, M82, M116, etc. 

If there's any rhyme or reason to changing them up so it's either 9M1, or R9P1, or M90-whatever, I don't know what it is. 

 

Then there's a rare one like Titanic, which just uses scene numbers: 

Sc034-R Southampton (Revised)
Sc273-R A Promise Kept (2nd Part Revised)

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14 hours ago, NL197 said:

And then there's things like 4M4R, R for "Revised", or 6M1A, like "Alternate", meaning the cue was changed in some fashion or totally re-written to accommodate a change in the scene's musical needs, or 2M7s, the S usually for a song / source cue. 

 

"A" usually doesn't stand for "Alternate", typically "Alt" is written instead. "A" typically means "part A"; usually there's also a "B" section, sometimes "C" and so on, although in some cases the original number is used for the first part and "A" is used for the second (something JW does quite often).

 

Personally I like to incorporate the date in case I mislabel something and need to search for a project file by date, something like M01C-210705 for example, just out of sheer forgetfulness. :P

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1 minute ago, Datameister said:

Some scores make it really easy to follow...others are really tough, particularly if there were a lot of changes to the cut while the composer was still writing.

 

*cough*

Spoiler

The Rise of Skywalker

*cough*

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Don't forget these:  ins, overlay, etc.  :)

 

Also, the M-slates (ie: M01, M02, etc) are usually typical of Warner Bros releases, fyi.  That's not to say it cannot happen elsewhere, but it is most common in the WB "realm".  And those are done by a ME usually; as the score itself could have 'normal' slates (1m02, 3m32, et al).

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I did a research about how long are the reels in a movie in the 80s/90s and today. It's here:

 

 

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