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James Horner - LEGENDS OF THE FALL in full score (Chris Siddall Publishing)


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Gee, and I thought this was an announcement of its release.


if I was able to do it right, attached is cover art for the Siddall releases.  It includes Legends as well the next two planned releases: Alien and Gremlins.

 

Taken from an e-mail from Chris Siddall, himself.

 

A3207C6E-B72B-4FC0-B6A1-C31EA2286240.webp

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  • 1 month later...
An e-mail I received earlier this evening:
 
Dear Film Music Fans,
 
Chris Siddall Music Publishing is proud to announce that the Legends of the Fall study score is ready for pre-ordering.  Horner's weighty and heart-breaking score is a symphonic masterpiece of thematic beauty and elegance.  From "The Ludlows" and "To the Boys" to "Samuel's Death" and "Revenge", every note of James Horner's spectacular score is presented in stunning detail.
 
Please visit ChrisSiddallMusic.com and be the first to own this classic masterpiece today.
 
223 pages, 9x12 inches. Paperbound, printed in the U.K.
 
$85.00
 
Available Worldwide
Note: Shipped from the UK. Please check with your country for import tax before ordering. This charge will be in addition to the item cost and shipping cost and varies by country.
Orders for Legends of the Fall are expected to ship week commencing 5th September 2022.
 
 

 

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Hehe thanks for this lovely thread - you beat me to it!  I was just about to set up an announcement.

The book is looking fabulous if I don't say so myself, and the music is so achingly beautiful.  It's deceptively simple too.  Lots of space in the score yet it sounds so warm and lush.  Definitely worthy of study!

 

 

LotF Promo 1.jpg

LotF Promo 2.jpg

Legends of the Fall Cover (Small File).jpg

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My copy just arrived yesterday and I'm looking forward to listening to the Intrada expanded score and following along with the score. I'm a big fan of the thematic and cue-by-cue analysis at the beginning - it will surely come in handy when trying to go deeper into the music!

 

I do have one question, though: I noticed that in the contents page, orchestrators are listed beside their respective cues (in this case, Thomas Pasatieri, Don Davis or James Horner himself). As a relative newcomer to Horner (and a big, big fan), for some reason I thought Horner orchestrated most, if not all, of his own music. Does the term "orchestrator" in this context mean simply taking Horner's orchestral manuscripts (like the image included in the book, which indicates nearly every single instrument and musical line) and inputting them neatly into the computer, or does it refer to a more active role of taking Horner's basic themes (i.e. melody and chords) and arranging them for the orchestra as scenes required? And was this consistent across most of his projects, or did it vary case-by-case?

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On 24/09/2022 at 3:53 PM, Trope said:

My copy just arrived yesterday and I'm looking forward to listening to the Intrada expanded score and following along with the score. I'm a big fan of the thematic and cue-by-cue analysis at the beginning - it will surely come in handy when trying to go deeper into the music!

 

I do have one question, though: I noticed that in the contents page, orchestrators are listed beside their respective cues (in this case, Thomas Pasatieri, Don Davis or James Horner himself). As a relative newcomer to Horner (and a big, big fan), for some reason I thought Horner orchestrated most, if not all, of his own music. Does the term "orchestrator" in this context mean simply taking Horner's orchestral manuscripts (like the image included in the book, which indicates nearly every single instrument and musical line) and inputting them neatly into the computer, or does it refer to a more active role of taking Horner's basic themes (i.e. melody and chords) and arranging them for the orchestra as scenes required? And was this consistent across most of his projects, or did it vary case-by-case?

 

Most composers use orchestrators to "fill out" their music.  Due to the volume of music required and the often-short deadlines, it's necessary to delegate some of the work.  You may have seen some 4- or 8-stave sketches from the likes of John Williams or Jerry Goldsmith, which are usually very precise and prescriptive about which instruments or sections should take each line or note.  James usually sketched on full score paper.  The amount of information on them varied depending on how precisely he wanted a scene or beat to be handled.  Some parts were essentially fully scored out and orchestrated, others very basically sketched, leaving it to the orchestrator (who would doubtless also have received a verbal briefing).

Some cues were not written down, but dictated to the "soloist" players, such as "12m2 Revenge".  This was fairly common for James, and features in several scores such as Field of Dreams, and Clear and Present Danger.

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10 hours ago, chrissiddall said:

 

Most composers use orchestrators to "fill out" their music.  Due to the volume of music required and the often-short deadlines, it's necessary to delegate some of the work.  You may have seen some 4- or 8-stave sketches from the likes of John Williams or Jerry Goldsmith, which are usually very precise and prescriptive about which instruments or sections should take each line or note.  James usually sketched on full score paper.  The amount of information on them varied depending on how precisely he wanted a scene or beat to be handled.  Some parts were essentially fully scored out and orchestrated, others very basically sketched, leaving it to the orchestrator (who would doubtless also have received a verbal briefing).

Some cues were not written down, but dictated to the "soloist" players, such as "12m2 Revenge".  This was fairly common for James, and features in several scores such as Field of Dreams, and Clear and Present Danger.

Thanks so much for clarifying! I recently listened to the music with score in hand, and I've come to appreciate it so much more than I already did. It may now be my favourite Horner score. I'm particularly loving how he treats the smaller moments - so simple and yet so evocative. One standout moment was this section in Tristan's Return, where he adds a countermelody on oboe, as well as a rising line in the harp (doubled by bass clarinet, which is a frequent doubling in this score). The harmonies work so beautifully. I hope you don't mind me sharing these few bars as a photograph.

 

Thank you for this amazing resource, and I look forward to future scores yet to be released! (Definitely will be keeping an eye out for Alien...)

Tristan's Return (Excerpt, BB.22-28).jpg

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