Jump to content
Lurker

What is the Last Film You Watched? - Part II

Recommended Posts

Especially if you think the Bull is racing.

Or if you think the movie is actually about a bull.

Says he who thinks a rabbit is keeping good form.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, what is that supposed to mean? Are rabbits not capable of keeping good form? Are rabbits just too stupid to do anything right? Is that it Morlock?

Not cool!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right.

So I checked out Purple Rose of Cairo. I'm not a big Woody Allen fan (quite the opposite), but I had to surrender to this gem. It was the right lenght, it had the right dialogue, the plot was spot-on and the performances were amazing - I'd rather not think this is the same Dumb and Dumber Jeff Daniels 'cause that's just depressing. And the ending was also spot-on - unpredictable, thought-provoking and yet so organic and coherent within the story. Kudos, Allen. I shudder at the thought of Charlie Kauffman dealing with this concept instead...

I also watched Little Miss Sunshine. Now I wish I had seen it before the Oscars, so I could be happy it won for Best Original Script. Now, I'm just not surprised it did. What a refreshing, non-pretentious experience this was. I mean, any movie carrying the message of "fuck the rest of the world" is cool for me, but this didn't just de-construct society - it actually constructed an alternative. I fear if I keep raving, it's just going to dissappoint future viewers, but I highly recommend this film. And the music added so much to it. So it was this kind of indie-film, folky kind of music, almost Tarantinesque, but it just gave the movie such energy. It wasn't very good music, but it was the soul of the experience. That's what film music does.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So I checked out Purple Rose of Cairo. I'm not a big Woody Allen fan (quite the opposite), but I had to surrender to this gem. It was the right lenght, it had the right dialogue, the plot was spot-on and the performances were amazing - I'd rather not think this is the same Dumb and Dumber Jeff Daniels 'cause that's just depressing. And the ending was also spot-on - unpredictable, thought-provoking and yet so organic and coherent within the story. Kudos, Allen. I shudder at the thought of Charlie Kauffman dealing with this concept instead...

I liked the film a lot. Woody takes a gimmicky concept and makes something out of it. All too often you hear of a great gimmick that is totally runied in the film (One of the reasons I think Stranger Than Fiction was one of the best films of last year- you'd love it).

I also watched Little Miss Sunshine. Now I wish I had seen it before the Oscars, so I could be happy it won for Best Original Script. Now, I'm just not surprised it did. What a refreshing, non-pretentious experience this was. I mean, any movie carrying the message of "fuck the rest of the world" is cool for me, but this didn't just de-construct society - it actually constructed an alternative. I fear if I keep raving, it's just going to dissappoint future viewers, but I highly recommend this film. And the music added so much to it. So it was this kind of indie-film, folky kind of music, almost Tarantinesque, but it just gave the movie such energy. It wasn't very good music, but it was the soul of the experience. That's what film music does.

I wanted to hug the film. Wonderful film. Doesn't over do it, doesn't feel the need to scream, I just loved it. The cast was all excellent, but Arkin was particularly lovable.

And I also thought the music was terrific in the film. I love the melancholy main theme over the titles, and the Whisteling and mariachi touches were totally unexpected, but just right. Although I still have no idea what Mychael Danna did, the whole score seems to be DeVotchka's music.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My least favorite Scorsese film is probably The Color of Money, and one of only a handful that I don't feel work, such as New York, New York and Boxcar Bertha. But even his few failures, in a broad cinematic sense, are still decent efforts, even if they fall a bit flat.

Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched A Clockwork Orange. Amazing film. I'll write some more a bit later, I need to think about it a bit first...

Let's just say I completely disagree with everything Roger Ebert wrote about this film. He seems to have completely missed the point of the entire movie...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I guess so. Although he has made at least a couple of un-contested masterpieces (Dr. Strangelove and Paths of Glory).

Hardly uncontested. While Strangelove was a huge hit with the public, the critics didn't exactly all praise it. One review at the time said that "Moscow gold could not have produced better propaganda", and another said that Kubrick should be physically harmed for making the film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That was then, this is now. People have more sense when it comes to that subject. A Clockwork Orange was a pretty controversial film when it came out, mostly due to the violence and disturbing nature of it.

Rabbit--who finds it funny that Ebert's wife loves Orange, while he hates it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The thing about A Clockwork Orange is, it makes the viewer feel very uneasy - not so much because of the violence, but because whichever side they take (the ultraviolent Alex, or the highly corrupt police and government), they are essentially siding with the "bad guys". There are no "good guys" in the film, no moral heroes to side with, and some people just don't like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The thing about A Clockwork Orange is, it makes the viewer feel very uneasy - not so much because of the violence, but because whichever side they take (the ultraviolent Alex, or the highly corrupt police and government), they are essentially siding with the "bad guys". There are no "good guys" in the film, no moral heroes to side with, and some people just don't like that.

Holy crap I just understood the movie!

Justin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rob is correct, even though he's pointing out the bleedin' obvious. I don't know how the actual depection of violence was seen in the year of it's release. But by today's standards, It's rather tame (though highly stylized)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think it's tame. The beating up of the homeless guy, the scene on the river bank, them assaulting the house, those are very disturbing to me. Modern violence is rarely disturbing.

The thing about A Clockwork Orange is, it makes the viewer feel very uneasy - not so much because of the violence, but because whichever side they take (the ultraviolent Alex, or the highly corrupt police and government), they are essentially siding with the "bad guys". There are no "good guys" in the film, no moral heroes to side with, and some people just don't like that.

Holy crap I just understood the movie!

Justin

What I love most about the film is how it practically dares you to stop watching. It's saying 'Yeah, the violence is bad. You can stop it by leaving the theater. But if you stay, you're just as guilty as I am. You want to see this violence, you want to see this character.' By having that narration, where we are always hearing McDowell's POV, we are made his confidants, his accomplices....a one of a kind film.

I saw the Frankenheimer Manchurian Candidate. Very good movie. Great perfromances by Harvey, Lansberry (one of the greatest villains ever), and especially Sinatra, which was surprising, as in the last calssic film I saw him in, he was bad, just like the rest of the film. Looks great, love some of the camera angles. Score was good (although I am rather fond of Portman's score to the remake). Excellent politcal thriller/satire. Not as glossy as the remake (which was not bad), and has some outdated elements, but still, very good. ***1/2/****.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just don't like that he left out the ending of the book. It was far more impacting for me than what Kubrick did, and I will always enjoy Burgesses' work more than Kubrick's on A Clockwork Orange.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Prestige for the second time (once at the theater, this time on DVD). Liked it even more the second time around, because it was more fun to watch Bale's performance after knowing the ending. I really like this movie.

Gremlins 2: The New Batch. Nothing fantastic, but it's fairly decent fun. A lot of cool gremlin moments, with new types of gremlins and some neat deaths. The second movie is basically poking fun at itself more so then the first one. The sequel is really, really self-aware and pretty much breaks down the wall between movie reality and its audience. I haven't seen this film since the early 90s. I was also taken aback with Jerry Goldsmiths cameo, as I didn't realize that he was in the film, albeit for a brief moment.

Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well blah.

At least tell me where in the second one he appears then.

He's a customer at the ice-cream parlor, showing up around 45 minutes in the film...'Did he say 'Rats'?' is his by-now-classic line...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't think it's tame. The beating up of the homeless guy, the scene on the river bank, them assaulting the house, those are very disturbing to me. Modern violence is rarely disturbing.

The Morlock is right. In Munich, however, some of the violence was extremely disturbing. Many words have been written about the assassination of the female assassinator.

Rocky: Beautiful! There are so many touching scenes in this movie ... It's incredible that Sly himself wrote this stuff. A classic!

Alex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What's going on here? Did she say there was a rat?

Yeah, I went back and looked up the bit. I didn't recognize him without the ponytail, although I always wondered who that guy was with the big white hair. He didn't seem to fit with the style of the rest of the movie. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't think it's tame. The beating up of the homeless guy, the scene on the river bank, them assaulting the house, those are very disturbing to me. Modern violence is rarely disturbing.

The Morlock is right. In Munich, however, some of the violence was extremely disturbing.

One of the successful elements in that film (which, IMO, was unsuccessful as a whole). Each assassination scene is gut-wrenching, disturbing, and leaves an impact on you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Casino Royale

After the Brosnan 007 films got progressively worse with each film I personally thought that it was time to retire the franchise.

I'm happy to say I was wrong, Daniel Craig is the best Bond since Connery and this is the best film since OHMSS. The only thing I didn't like is the title song, while it has a good Bond melody I felt they could have found someone better to sing it. Judi Dench gives her best performance out of the 5 films she's appeared in. The endig feels a bit tacked on but it doesn't ruin the film.

Predator

A good solid action film. I was a bit disappointed in the DTS track although Silvestri's music benefited from it. The cinematography is excellent, McTiernan gives the film a very clausterphobic feeling within the jungle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At last I saw the last major 2006 release: Pan's Labrynth. I really have to see it again to properly gauge it. Not because anything it did wrong (I didn't find anything big), but because I was expecting something very different. I was expecting a film more like, well, Labrynth. I'm not at all dissapointed, I admire the movie, but I was geared up toward somethin that is more fairytale. I wasn't expecting something far deeper and fascinating.

I cannot propely judge the film based on this viewing. It's already out on DVD, so I'll check it out in the coming weeks/months.

I can make observations about the technical aspects of the film, however.

Acting was very good. The girl was very striking, as was the Captain. Mercedes was good, but she was part of the film I wasn't expecting, so I'll be better informed after the second viewing.

Cinematography was excellent. While I still think that Children of Men is the best shot film of 06' (with The Illusionist not far behind), it's hard to complain when you get work of this caliber. I do think that there was overuse of cutting while panning, but, in general- a great looking picture, with terrific cinematography, which always seems to be intent on telling the story in the most interesting and involving way possible. Beautiful colors, very vivid.

Production design is excellent. I liked that the set of the labrynth didn't look like it was built last week with intent to look ancient- it really did look ancient.

Music was okay, but I did not feel was excellent. The lullaby is nice enough (I don't understand why so many people hear The Eiger Sanction in there so strongly...the resemblance is so minute), but I felt a few scenes in the film was overscored and/or inapropriately scored.

In general, I admire Del-Toro for making this film, I was surprised by the gentleness of it, and I greatly appreciated it. Hopefully, after another viewing, I'll also love it.

And on the same note....I also saw The Naked Gun for the first time in a few years. I was in a Leslie Nielson mood. The movie is aboslutely review-proof, you either laugh or you don't. Myself, I laughed a lot. ***/****.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Week 11.

57. Almost Famous (2000)

I really enjoyed this. It has a great cast, and Cameron Crowe's films seem to have a tendency to give me a warm fuzzy feeling. Kate Hudson shines in almost every scene she's in, and every other castmember is excellent as well. I'm curious about the Untitled director's cut. Good stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cameron Crowe's films seem to have a tendency to give me a warm fuzzy feeling.

Yeah, that's what I love about Vanilla Sky. ;)

Wonderful film. I've got the Untitled cut. I don't think I've ever seen the original cut, so I couldn't tell you the difference. Hudson, McDormand, Crudup and, of course, Phillip Seymour Hoffman were all terrific.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't seen Vanilla Sky (although I have seen Abre los ojos). As a matter of fact, I've only seen this and Jerry Maguire, but both left me warm and fuzzy (hence "seem to have a tendency"). ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I haven't seen Vanilla Sky (although I have seen Abre los ojos). As a matter of fact, I've only seen this and Jerry Maguire, but both left me warm and fuzzy (hence "seem to have a tendency"). :thumbup:

After enoying Almost Famous a lot, I was very disappointed by Vanilla Sky. Very much a Hollywoodization (is that a word?) of the excellent original.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saw Casino Royale (still great) and Rocky Balboa (god I felt so happy afterwards) on the plane to Maui

Bought and watched The Departed (still great), The Prestige (still great), and A Good Year (had wanted to see it and was pleased with the result and the new composer).

Finished Cars today, not as bad as I thought it would be but definately needs a trim in the middle. Newman's score was the best of his other Pixar films.

and since I wont bother searching for the Pirates thread

At Worlds End clip and if you go to this link tonight the trailer will be up

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Little Big Man: One of the films that helped redefine the genre (the western) in the early 70s. It's still rather good but I guess I've seen it one too many times. However, I'm always impressed by the late Richard Mulligan who, in my view, delivers the best General Custer ever seen on screen. Also worth mentioning is the actor who plays the charismatically Wild Bill Hickock (Jeff Corey), even though it's just a small part.

Alex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never got around to watching it. I started it once, but wat quie uninvolved and bored by the 45 minute point, I gave up and never got back to it. I must watch it one of these days.

I saw Confessions of a Dangerous Mind. I like the film a lot. Sam Rockwell is good. It's the only film aside from E.T. that I like Drew Barrymore in. Julia Roberts was the perfect choice for the part. Reminds me of a young Bacall. And Robert John Burke is very funny as the drill instructor.

Film looks very good, great set design. Terrific style to it in general. It is a bit heavy handed, and I suspect not quite as edgy as Charlie Kaufman had in mind, but still, very good directorial debut by Clooney (and he already got much better for his second film). ***/**** (I'd add another 1/2* out of affection, but it's not THAT good).

And I saw Time Bandits for the first time. I hope people growing up with it love it, since I didn't like it at all. I do not think it works as a family film, it is purely a children's film. Sure, it has it's moments that I appreciated, but they were few and far between. A lot of the elements I liked in theory, but not in execution. Effects are typical 80's fair, and I find that nothing dates a film quite as much as 80's effects (and music).

The kid was terrible. The dwarfs were fun, but I got the sense that Gilliam was too affectionate towards the odder looking people. The camera often stares at them as if anything they might say will be great, when I think the roles they are given are generally far too kiddie fair.

The John Clease/Michael Palin/Shellie Duvall bits were mildly amusing.

The Napoleon sequence I liked in theory, but I didn't think it worked.

The Agammemnon sequence was a great triumph of feel and design, a total failure at inducing interest in the story.

David Warner was fun, but, some how, I was expecting something more memorable.

Only thing that worked perfectly was Ralph Richardson. Inspired casting, Richardson is perfect, just a wonderful scene.

I feel the ending is dumb, dumb, dumb. I dig delibarately avoiding a fairy tale ending, but that was just pointless and had WTF? written all over it.

I can't imagine anyone who did not grow up with this film really liking it (Otherwise known as Jurrasic Park-itis).

**/****.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought Time Bandits was pretty mediocre at the time. I've never seen it since.

Ok guys, I've finally watched Casino Royale and by MacGuyver, this has to be the best Bond movie ever! It was about time they updated the formula and I think they did a very good job. It's clear that they have been looking at the Bourne films but I felt they have managed to keep their own identity. I was at the edge of my seat for practiacally the whole duration (144 min!). Bravo!

Alex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Casino Royale is a very good film, but it can't touch From Russia with Love and On Her Majesty's Secret Service for the top spots in my rankings.

I can't rank them specifically, but I'll group them into ratings out of four:

****

From Russia with Love

On Her Majesty's Secret Service

***1/2

Dr. No

Goldfinger

Thunderball

The Living Daylights

Licence to Kill

Casino Royale

***

You Only Live Twice

Diamonds are Forever (I'll be executed for rating this so highly, I'm sure)

For Your Eyes Only

Octopussy

Goldeneye

The World is Not Enough

**1/2

Live and Let Die

Tomorrow Never Dies

**

The Man with the Golden Gun

The Spy Who Loved Me (I just don't "get" this one)

Moonraker

Die Another Day

*1/2

A View to a Kill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No, but as I mentioned earlier it is the best Bond film since OHMSS and I think Craig is the best Bond since Connery.

Agreed on both counts. I still think Connery is the ultimate Bond, followed by Craig, then Dalton, then Brosnan, then Lazenby - who I think is underrated by the general public, but slightly overrated by Bond fans. A brilliant film no doubt, but I do think his performance is rather wooden.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe if Lazenby had stayed with Bond he could have been one of the best. Not as good as Connery (but then who is?) but he would have been one of the top Bonds.

I liked Dalton, Moore and Bronsan but the material they had to work with and the films didn't bring out their best.

Moore and Brosnan had the charm but lacked the hardness. You could say the opposite was true for Dalton.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...