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The Fellowship of the Ring COMPLETE RECORDINGS 3CD set


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Shore's Rings Complete Recordings Coming

Source: Reprise Records

September 16, 2005

The complete Oscar and Grammy winning score to "The Fellowship of the Ring," from the epic film trilogy "The Lord of the Rings," will be available in a deluxe four-disc edition from Reprise/WMG Soundtracks on November 22nd, 2005.

This historic release contains over 180 minutes of music on three CDs, comprising the full score of the 2001 film, composed by Howard Shore. "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, The Complete Recordings" marks the first edition of the three complete recording releases of the film trilogy whose score has been honored with three Academy Awards, four Grammy Awards, and two Golden Globe Awards. This deluxe set also includes exclusive new artwork, packaging, and extensive liner notes culled from "The Music of the Lord of the Rings Films," to be published in 2006. Enya's song "May It Be," which received an Oscar nomination for Best Original Song and which she performed at the Academy Awards ceremony, is contained on "The Complete Recordings" within all-new selection titles that reflect the complete score being released in its entirety for the first time.

Says "The Lord of the Rings" director, Peter Jackson, "No matter how many great performances or exciting visuals we put together for the movie, we found that it was all somewhat two dimensional until we added the emotional heart of Howard Shore's music. Then, and only then, did the film come to life."

Added Paul Broucek, Executive Vice President of Music at New Line Cinema, "Listening to the breathtaking music Howard Shore created is like seeing the movie time and time again. You just close your eyes, open your ears and the whole film unfolds before you. Howard's work is incredibly visual, evocative and narrative."

Composer of over sixty film scores, Howard Shore brought a lifetime of experience to creating the epochal soundtrack for The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. Shore used Tolkien's texts and drew from multiple periods throughout music history to evoke the book's enchanted worlds. He developed over 80 leitmotifs to describe the cultures of Middle-earth. Collaborating with authors/lyrists Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens, he composed choral music including the Tolkien-created languages for the Elves (Quenya and Sindarin), the Dwarves (Khuzdûl), Men (Adûnaic) and the evil cultures of Mordor (Black Speech). The result was a movie music breakthrough that has been followed by such subsequent triumphs by Shore as The Aviator, Gangs of New York, The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers and "The Return of the King." "The Lord Of The Rings Symphony: Six Movements for Orchestra and Chorus," a two-hour work based on the twelve hours of score composed for the film trilogy, has been performed in over 70 concerts in cities all over the world.

Composed for symphony orchestra and three separate choirs, "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, The Complete Recordings" highlights two original compositions by the multi-platinum Irish recording artist, Enya, including "Aníron (Theme for Aragorn and Arwen)" and "May It Be." Also featured in the score are solo performances by Elizabeth Fraser, Edward Ross, Mabel Faletolu as well as cast members Ian Holm, Ian McKellen, Viggo Mortensen, Billy Boyd and Dominic Monaghan.

The fourth disc will present "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, The Complete Recordings" in 5.1 Surround Sound in DVD format. The set will also include exclusive new artwork, packaging, and extensive liner notes: "The Music of the Lord of the Rings Films -- Part I: The Fellowship of the Ring" by author Doug Adams.

"Appropriately enough for the film adaptation of one of fantasy literature's most enduring favorites," wrote the All Music Guide, "Howard Shore's score for Peter Jackson's 'The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring' is traditional and majestic, using sweeping strings, brass and choral sections to create moments of fire-and-brimstone menace as well heroic triumph."

 

 

ADMIN NOTE:

Click HERE to jump to the reveal of the track list

Click HERE to jump to the reveal of the cover art

Click HERE to jump to the reveal of the track TIMES

Click HERE to jump to the first soundclips

And click HERE to jump to when the first JWFanner received his set and actual discussion of the release begins!

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Howdy -    Stumbled across my own assessment (I'm reluctant to call it a review) of the FotR CR from January 2006; i.e. before half of you were even alive (or thereabouts). Mind, this was wr

As much as various 'authorities' have denied that, I have to concur with you - every edit and mixing decision matches the film. If it weren't the isolated score, then why are there so many oddities li

Hey, long-time lurker/reader and rare poster, but I saw this and had to spread the news. Fellowship comes out in a few months, with the other two to follow at some point.

http://www.soundtrack.net/news/article/?id=660

Complete LORD OF THE RINGS: FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING coming in November

Release Date:(09/16/2005)

The complete Oscar and Grammy winning score to "The Fellowship of the Ring," from the epic film trilogy "The Lord of the Rings," will be available in a deluxe four-disc edition from Reprise/WMG Soundtracks on November 22nd, 2005.

This historic release contains over 180 minutes of music on three CDs, comprising the full score of the 2001 film, composed by Howard Shore. "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, The Complete Recordings" marks the first edition of the three complete recording releases of the film trilogy whose score has been honored with three Academy Awards, four Grammy Awards, and two Golden Globe Awards. This deluxe set also includes exclusive new artwork, packaging, and extensive liner notes culled from "The Music of the Lord of the Rings Films," to be published in 2006. Enya's song "May It Be," which received an Oscar nomination for Best Original Song and which she performed at the Academy Awards ceremony, is contained on "The Complete Recordings" within all-new selection titles that reflect the complete score being released in its entirety for the first time.

Says "The Lord of the Rings" director, Peter Jackson, "No matter how many great performances or exciting visuals we put together for the movie, we found that it was all somewhat two dimensional until we added the emotional heart of Howard Shore's music. Then, and only then, did the film come to life."

Added Paul Broucek, Executive Vice President of Music at New Line Cinema, "Listening to the breathtaking music Howard Shore created is like seeing the movie time and time again. You just close your eyes, open your ears and the whole film unfolds before you. Howard's work is incredibly visual, evocative and narrative."

Composer of over sixty film scores, Howard Shore brought a lifetime of experience to creating the epochal soundtrack for The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. Shore used Tolkien's texts and drew from multiple periods throughout music history to evoke the book's enchanted worlds. He developed over 80 leitmotifs to describe the cultures of Middle-earth. Collaborating with authors/lyrists Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens, he composed choral music including the Tolkien-created languages for the Elves (Quenya and Sindarin), the Dwarves (Khuzdûl), Men (Adûnaic) and the evil cultures of Mordor (Black Speech). The result was a movie music breakthrough that has been followed by such subsequent triumphs by Shore as The Aviator, Gangs of New York, The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers and "The Return of the King." "The Lord Of The Rings Symphony: Six Movements for Orchestra and Chorus," a two-hour work based on the twelve hours of score composed for the film trilogy, has been performed in over 70 concerts in cities all over the world.

Composed for symphony orchestra and three separate choirs, "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, The Complete Recordings" highlights two original compositions by the multi-platinum Irish recording artist, Enya, including "Aníron (Theme for Aragorn and Arwen)" and "May It Be." Also featured in the score are solo performances by Elizabeth Fraser, Edward Ross, Mabel Faletolu as well as cast members Ian Holm, Ian McKellen, Viggo Mortensen, Billy Boyd and Dominic Monaghan.

The fourth disc will present "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, The Complete Recordings" in 5.1 Surround Sound in DVD format. The set will also include exclusive new artwork, packaging, and extensive liner notes: "The Music of the Lord of the Rings Films -- Part I: The Fellowship of the Ring" by author Doug Adams.

"Appropriately enough for the film adaptation of one of fantasy literature's most enduring favorites," wrote the All Music Guide, "Howard Shore's score for Peter Jackson's 'The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring' is traditional and majestic, using sweeping strings, brass and choral sections to create moments of fire-and-brimstone menace as well heroic triumph."

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Laus Deo et Howard Shore!!! Gratias quam maximas iis ago!!! Jubilate, triumphate omnes homines terrae! Dies gaudii adventus est!!!

Finally! This is something I have been waiting for years! :mrgreen::):ola::ola::ola::ola::ola::ola::ola::ola::ola::ola::ola::ola::ola:

I can't wait for November!!!

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It is possible that there are that many themes and motifs (yes really). Shore wrote an extremely complex and deep work that has so many smaller themes and motifs running along with the bigger themes. E.g. even the Ringwraiths choir theme has two or three motifs combined with it in most scenes. The amount of motifs mentioned is huge but Shore put tremendous detail into the work so many motifs could be very small or buried in the complex orchestration. The more I listento the LOTR the more motifs I am able to hear. On different LOTR music sites people have point out new things in familiar cues that I had not thought of. It is a hugely complex work.

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We do know this will have all the music from the extended edition of the film. I believe Doug Adams himself said that on moviemusic.com As far as unused music being in the score who knows, we'll have to wait and see. I don't have the original soundtracks for the LOTR's music. However I might pick them up a long with this complete score for Fellowship Of The Ring then of course get The Two Towers and Return Of The King's full scores when they come out.

Would be nice this November too if the full score for ROTS came out but I doubt that will happen..

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So rotk in the end of 2006 or later. Great :roll:

The Two Towers will probably come out mid 2006 and Return Of The King in fall of 06. You gotta remember it takes time to do this stuff. They thought it would be out in April but here were are 5 months later and it's still being worked on.

They got to hire people to mix the music, they got to do all the consultation and persmission work with New Line Cinema and Howard Shore. Still though it takes time. I wasn't expecting something like this to come out in a full blown 6 disc packaged set.

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Indeed, when you complete the set after ROTK is out, it'll be far more than 6 discs. :)

And there's tons of leitmotifs in these scores. I'm sure there are plenty I've never noticed myself. Really looking forward to the liner notes and the Doug Adams book.

Marian - who remembers being very surprised when discovering the Arwen theme months after hearing FOTR for the first time.

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The delay from spring to fall was caused by some restructuring at Warner if I remember correctly. The actual work on this thingy began around June/ July, so four months for one Soundtrack should be a reasonable estimation. Add one month for manufacturing the boxes and you end up with 10 months, give or take.

Concerning 80 leitmotifs: I have spotted about 40 motifs that I could call "leitmotifs" without feeling silly. Although I am still in awe of Shore's genius, I can't really see where they could have picked up twice as much.

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OK settled down now. ;)

The inclusion of the music in DVD 5.1 surround is a nice surprise.

Audiophiles will complain that it's not SACD or (probably) not DVD-A, but since it will probably add very little to the overall costs I can't say I see any down side.

Also even on the end credits on the EE DVD's the music sound amazing.

How much will this cost and does it even matter? This is like the electricity bill, you pay it simply because you have no other choice.

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IMO, you cant have 80 leitmotifs. using them just twice will be half the score. And what about the complete work? 240 leitmotifs more or less?    

And one time ussage cues are not leitmotifs, even if they are related to somewhere or someone.

There are close to a hundred leitmotifs in Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen, all printed in the opera programmes I got at the Vienna State Opera. This is for a cycle that spans 14 CDs, so it's a bit longer still than Shore's LOTR, but there's also more leitmotifs in here. Some motifs appear in several variations as different leitmotifs, so you can count those multiple times.

Marian - who wouldn't bet it's 80, but can imagine it might be over 40.

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If it's about the 3 films, then it is possible to have 80. If wagner ring cicle has 'only' about a hundred, it is not possibe for FOTR to have that many...

Why? Wagner has three or four leitmotifs based on Horner's danger motif... and those 4 notes are played constantly throughout Die Walküre. I don't think Shore repeats a single theme as often as Wagner repeats these, so that comparison doesn't really hold.

Marian are you saying variations (orchestrations) of one leitmotif counts as various?

Variations, yes, sometimes... if the variation of the old leitmotif results in a new leitmotif (for a related but not identical target, for example - take the ROTJ liner notes and what they say about creating a new motif out of Yoda's Theme). Some websites seem to count even minor variations of leitmotifs as new motifs (and thus list far over a hundred for the Ring), but I wasn't talking about these.

Orchestrations aren't variations. A different orchestration of motif A is still motif A.

Marian - :)

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BTW, the press report does not specify if they are releasing the score of the cinema version of if the additional music from the extended DVD editions will be included.

It's included, there's not over 180 minutes of music in the theatrical cut. And there's not even 180 in the DVD cut, so we should definitely be getting those alternates and unused too.

ttbk

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Doug Adams has been saying for months the releases will also include the music from the Extended Editions.

If a piece of music appears in the DVD cut of Lord of the Rings, it will be on CD. If a piece of music was written for the Lord of the Rings and not used, it will be on CD. If a piece of music was written and used in Lord of the Rings but slightly edited in the film, the piece of music as originally composed, performed and recorded, will be on CD.
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That was before an official announcement.

And before the final shape of this release was decided upon (for years this was gonna be a box set with music for all the films released in one go).

Things have changed (a DVD is added for instance) so I want to know if statements made by Doug moths ago are still valid.

Stefancos- still suffering from TPM: UE angst.

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Well the press statement does say that vocal contibutions of Ian McKellen, Holm, etc etc will be included.

All of them only sang in the extended version.

I personally would prefer the main body of the release to present the score in cronological order following the theatrical cut (minus any edits or loops). Since this is essentually the best way it would play (even on the extended DVD you can pick up the slight change in soundmix of the new cues recorded during the TTT sessions).

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The source music for the Departure of the Elves was composed by the New Zealand band called Plan 9 that also composed the music for Bilbo's birthday party sequence (which I would like to hear on the new release) and contributed to the sound effects of the Ring (the female voices that can be heard in TTT).

I hope somebody with official knowledge would illuminate us what does the release contain and deliver us from this second guessing uncertainty.

It is going to be very agonising two months of waiting and speculating on the subject :|

By the way I have written to Doug Adams (some time ago) and he said his book (I am hoping the CD releases too) contain all the lyrics(and translations) for all the choir and soloist pieces. I think it is an important (though not vital) part of the music to understand the meaning of the words the choir/soloist is singing. For me they add another new layer to the music. LOTR choir pieces are very operatic in this way as they illustrate the scene and actually have relevance to the action at hand (unlike many other modern film scores that use choir as a part of the texture).

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If it's about the 3 films, then it is possible to have 80. If wagner ring cicle has 'only' about a hundred, it is not possibe for FOTR to have that many...

Marian are you saying variations (orchestrations) of one leitmotif counts as various?

Wagner's work has about 193 motifs and variations of motifs (they count as separate in analysis I have heard). I have a double disc from Decca that has a thematic analysis of Wagner's Ring Cycle by musicologist Deryck Cook, that was made in 1968. It illustrates the themes and motif families quite deftly and many motifs Wagner wrote are permutations of the same motif but represent different things or the same thing changed in the course of the narrative of the operas. It is mind bogling really, how many variations one theme has as a whole plethora of motifs can be derived from one basic theme/motif.

The double disc set contains the narration and excerpts from the operas performed by Wiener Philharmoniker and conducted by Georg Solti (taken from the the Decca release of Ring Cycle).

The point I try to make is that in LOTR Shore has clearly written families of themes (like the Ring theme bears a similarity with Mordor theme(listen to the three first notes)) that have many permutations. When we finally have the Doug Adams' book and the liner notes we can finally be sure of these thematic links between motifs.

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Wagner's Ring Cycle is analyzed to bits by the musicologists and the amount of motifs would be smaller if they would not count all variations as new themes/motifs in the same family. LOTR has a great amount of motifs but 80 seems quite high (though it is possible). Still Shore wrote the score for 4-5 years whereas Wagner wrote his operas during 26 years. Wagner had time to sit down and weave such complex inter relations between themes and variations (not that Shore did not do this but he had ultimately less time). I do not think we should count every new variation of a theme as a new motif (Star Wars would have so huge amount of motifs :P ). That just complicates matters too much. But if a composer makes a difference between the variations of a theme as representing something new instead the character ect. what it was first used for then it is so. End of story. But we rarely get to hear these things from any film composer so the LOTR release with Doug Adams' book is a great and rare treat.

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