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SCORE: Robin Hood - Andy Price (2006)

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Spoiler Warning: below, you will find spoilers for all three seasons of the show, so if you are planning on watching it, I would suggest doing so before reading this analysis.

 

ABOUT THE SHOW.

Back in 2006, the BBC decided it was time for yet another adaptation of the legend of Robin Hood. The resulting series, which was aimed at a young audience, lasted for 3 seasons, which were broadcasted from October 2006 to June 2009. In the first season, we are introduced to Robin Of Locksley and his loyal servant Much, returning from the Crusades after a long absence only to find out that their people are now living under the rule of the new, tyrannical Sheriff Of Nottingham and his lieutenant Guy Of Gisborne. Of course, Robin soon decides to take action to stop the spreading evilness, but by force of circumstances, he is stripped of his title and lands and finds refuge in Sherwood Forest, where he encounters a group of outlaws who will turn out to be unlikely allies in his fight against the Sheriff.

The premise is obviously quite faithful to the legend as we know it, but the writers also tried to instill the show with a more modern twist, which sometimes led to some peculiar situations and costume designs. The cast was fine for the most part: Jonas Armstrong made for a convincing enough Robin, Lucy Griffiths was a nice, more proactive Marian, Richard Armitage gave an interesting performance as Gisborne (a nicely-written conflicted character) and Keith Allen was pretty hilarious as the Sheriff Of Nottingham. The rest of the recurring actors (the ones playing the outlaws) were never really given the chance to shine but they still managed to make the characters their own by giving them distinct quirks and personality traits. Sam Troughton as Much in particular had a nice character arc throughout the show. Joe Armstrong was another one who managed to stand out a bit as trickster Allan A Dale, with quite a few well-placed one-liners. The remaining members of the gang (Gordon Kennedy as Little John, Harry Lloyd as Will Scarlett and Anjali Jay as the Saracen Djaq) unfortunately never had the chance to make a strong impression.

The first season of the show was quite a mixed bag, mostly due to the fact that it was rather disjointed, with no clear narrative arc binding all thirteen episodes together, instead each one (with a few exceptions) told a contained story within its 45 minutes runtime. Plus, the filmmaking crew seemed to have trouble finding the right tone and look for the show. But as it went on, the show did get a bit better about halfway through that season: the production values slightly increased (finally, there were more extras in Nottingham), the scripts were a bit better handled, and there were actually some clever ideas to be found here and there in the episodes. The cinematography was also a tad improved (the awkward sudden zoom-in/zoom-out that could be found in some shots in early episodes were thankfully quickly abandoned). But ultimately, the show left a lot to be desired. One thing, however, that was consistent in quality throughout the entire season was the score by Andy Price.

 

ABOUT THE SCORE.

The score for the show was composed by Andy Price, orchestrated by David Butterworth and conducted by Miklós Malek & Péter Pejtsik. It was performed by the 73-piece Danubia Symphony Orchestra and was recorded at the Budapest Opera House. The score Price wrote for the series offers a rich musical tapestry, with a wealth of thematic material and incidental melodies as well as source music cues. For each episode (that was given an original score, that is. More on that below.), the composer recorded approximately 25 to 30 minutes of music, and these scores were distinct from one another because of themes exclusive to each and every one of them. Indeed, while the overall score had a thematic core (that is to say, main thematic ideas that were heard in many episodes), due to the procedural nature of the show, with characters and plot points introduced in an episode disappearing by the end of said episode, never to be heard of again, Price also wrote minor themes for each episode that he unfortunately couldn't develop in the following stories. As a result, there were a great number of themes written for the show, but they unfortunately only appeared a few times in the episode they were written for. That being said, the heart of the score remained the themes for the main characters, and these were given many variations throughout the show.

For the first season of the show, Price recorded all in all approximately 3 hours and 30 minutes of music. Only the first seven episodes of that season were given a full original score. Of the remaining ones, Episode 8, Episode 11 and Episode 13 had no original music written for them (instead, tracked music from the previous episodes were used in them) and only a few cues (4, to be precise) were recorded for Episode 9, Episode 10 and Episode 12. The score for that season introduced the themes for Robin, Marian, Gisborne, the Sheriff, the Outlaws as well as the town of Nottingham and its castle and Locksley Village, along with episode-specific themes (that is to say melodies depicting characters or plot points limited to one episode). One can see some sort of musical evolution throughout that first season: the scores for the first two episodes represent an introduction to the world of Robin Hood (consisting of many cues that act like short concert presentations of the main thematic ideas), the music for the third and fourth episodes then takes a darker turn (with a lot of material focused on the Sheriff and Gisborne's themes), before Price decided to give us lighter and more heroic material for the fifth and sixth episodes, and finally, the score for the seventh episode combined all those previous ideas into a nice well-rounded package. Since no complete scores were recorded for the episodes of the second half of the season, Price was not given the opportunity to bring the themes to a satisfying climax during the season finale (although he would eventually get this opportunity with the following seasons). The music for the first season thus ended with the score for the seventh episode (along with the few cues written for Episode 9, Episode 10 and Episode 12), with no particular conclusive feel to it, an aspect that would be corrected with the scores for the next seasons.

 

*****

 

ANALYSIS OF THE ORIGINAL ALBUM

You can download this analysis in PDF format (with pretty pictures and pretty audio samples of the themes for a better reading experience) here.

To be able to play the audio samples, you will have to download the PDF.

 

THE ALBUM RELEASE.

The musical album of Robin Hood was released on November 27, 2006, halfway through the first season. Recorded at the Budapest Opera House, it contains music from the first five episodes of that season, as well as a select few cues from Episode 7, Episode 9 and finally Episode 12. Not represented on this album is the musical score for Episode 6 (the other remaining episodes had no original music written for them, instead material from the previous scores was tracked in them). The album program is comprised of 34 tracks for a total running time of 57 minutes (which represents all in all less than a third of the music Andy Price wrote and recorded for the first season of the show). All the major themes from the show were featured on the album (with the exception of the Nottingham Town Motif), as well as some of the minor thematic ideas.

You can listen to that album here.

 

The tracklist.

 

Spoiler

01. Robin Hood Theme 0’42 features music from the opening credits of every episode
02. Journey Home 0’32 features music from Episode 1 - “Will You Tolerate This?”
03. Run Master! Run! 1’03 features music from Episode 1 - “Will You Tolerate This?”
04. Locksley 2’04 features music from Episode 1 - “Will You Tolerate This?”
05. Marian’s Theme 1’23 features music from Episode 1 - “Will You Tolerate This?”
06. Your Eyes 0’53 features music from Episode 1 - “Will You Tolerate This?” and Episode 7 - “Brothers In Arms”
07. Rescue 3’13 features music from Episode 1 - “Will You Tolerate This?”
08. The Sheriff Gets His Man 3’08 features music from Episode 2 - “Sheriff Got Your Tongue?”
09. Scaling The Walls 0’58 features music from Episode 2 - “Sheriff Got Your Tongue?”
10. Outlaws 2’17 features music from Episode 2 - “Sheriff Got Your Tongue?”
11. From The Rich To The Poor 1’21 features music from Episode 2 - “Sheriff Got Your Tongue?”
12. Chasing The Nightwatchman 0’33 features music from Episode 3 - “Who Shot The Sheriff?”
13. Flush Him Out 1’10 features music from Episode 3 - “Who Shot The Sheriff?
14. Proving His Innocence 2’35 features music from Episode 3 - “Who Shot The Sheriff?”
15. A Noble Deed 1’33 features music from Episode 3 - “Who Shot The Sheriff?”
16. Gisborne’s Trap 2’02 features music from Episode 4 - “Parent Hood”
17. Shooting Pies 1’56 features music from Episode 4 - “Parent Hood”
18. Robin And Marian 2’07 features music from Episode 4 - “Parent Hood”
19. Marian’s Punishment 1’50 features music from Episode 4 - “Parent Hood”
20. Two Mothers 3’10 features music from Episode 1 - “Will You Tolerate This?” and Episode 4 - “Parent Hood”
21. Where Is She? 2’10 features music from Episode 4 - “Parent Hood”
22. Him I Liked 1’34 features music from Episode 4 - “Parent Hood”
23. Different Directions 0’51 features music from Episode 4 - “Parent Hood”
24. Silver Arrow 1’58 features music from Episode 5 - “Turk Flu”
25. Gisborne Woos Marian 1’29 features music from Episode 5 - “Turk Flu”
26. The Sheriff’s Plan 2’19 features music from Episode 5 - “Turk Flu”
27. A Love That Cannot Be 1’20 features music from Episode 9 - “A Thing Or Two About Loyalty”
28. Lucky George 2’08 features music from Episode 7 - “Brothers In Arms”
29. He’s My Brother 0’57 features music from Episode 7 - “Brothers In Arms”
30. The Nightwatchman 1’14 features music from Episode 7 - “Brothers In Arms”
31. The Hanging 1’13 features music from Episode 7 - “Brothers In Arms”
32. No Way Out 2’22 features music from Episode 7 - “Brothers In Arms”
33. I Never Told Her I Loved Her 1’17 features music from Episode 12 - “The Return Of The King”
34. Robin Hood End Credits 1’27  features music from the end credits of every episode

 

CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER.

Below are the tracks from the album release presented in the order in which their first appear throughout the season. While the original program was for the most part already chronological, a few cues were moved around, in order to try to improve the listening experience it would seem. Not much editing is necessary to recreate the order in which the cues are meant to appear in: only two tracks need to be split, as they present music from two different scenes (two different episodes, in fact). Suggested titles for the second half of said tracks can be found below the list.
 

Spoiler

01. Robin Hood Theme
03. Run Master! Run!
02. Journey Home
04. Locksley
05. Marian’s Theme
06. Your Eyes [0’00-0’26]
20. Two Mothers* [1’03-End]
07. Rescue
08. The Sheriff Gets His Man
09. Scaling The Walls
10. Outlaws
11. From The Rich To The Poor
12. Chasing The Nightwatchman
13. Flush Him Out
14. Proving His Innocence
15. A Noble Deed
16. Gisborne’s Trap
17. Shooting Pies
18. Robin And Marian
19. Marian’s Punishment
20. Two Mothers [0’00-1’03]
21. Where Is She?
22. Him I Liked
23. Different Directions
24. Silver Arrow
25. Gisborne Woos Marian
26. The Sheriff’s Plan
28. Lucky George
30. The Nightwatchman
29. He’s My Brother
06. Your Eyes** [0’26-End]
31. The Hanging
32. No Way Out
27. A Love That Cannot Be
33. I Never Told Her I Loved Her
34. Robin Hood End Credits

 

**Rename To “The Night Before The Execution”
**Rename To “In The Name Of Robin Hood”

 

LINER NOTES.

“I was first approached to compose the music for Robin Hood at the beginning of 2006. I was asked how I would go about creating the musical world for such an English icon. The answer was simple - there are good guys and bad guys, fights and chases, love themes and above all a hero. The music would have it all.
Uppermost in our minds, at that point, was creating a musical identity for Robin that would encapsulate the spirit of the man at the centre of everything. The melody would have to be bold and daring, as well as arrogant and humorous. It would have to include some romance as well as nobility and, if possible, incorporate a hint of England and the English countryside as well. Simple!
We experimented with a few ideas until we arrived at the melody we now have. Other melodies soon followed for Marian and Locksley - both derived from Robin’s theme. The music for the Sheriff and his lieutenant Guy of Gisborne needed to reflect the differences in their characters. The Sheriff’s music is far more cunning than the obvious brooding evil of Gisborne. Interestingly, the dynamic motif for the outlaws is a variation on the sweet, lyrical lullaby that was written for Little John’s wife to sing to their son.
It has been a huge pleasure to work on such a fantastic adventure story. I hope the music conveys something of the wonderful spirit of the show.”

 

Andy Price, October 2006

 

THE THEMES OF ROBIN HOOD

 

MAJOR THEMATIC IDEAS.

In this section are described the main themes of the show, that is to say the melodies that are heard in multiple episodes and that represent the key players and locations of the story. The complete score for the first season features a few additional themes that were not included on the album release: these will not be discussed here.
 

Robin’s Theme (a.k.a. Robin’s Fanfare)

The melody that represents Robin is of course the most prominent theme in the show and the one that is given the most variations throughout the score, from bold, bombastic statements in fanfaric mode (Rescue) to more playful and lighthearted settings (Lucky George), as well noble and sorrowful renditions (Robin Hood End Credits). The theme captures the heroism, the wittiness and the energy of the character, and while it is mainly used to depict him, it can also be seen in a broader sense as a melody for all the good guys in the story. Price often uses the first phrase of that theme to evoke it without quoting it fully (Silver Arrow, Outlaws), preferring to keep the complete melody for pivotal moments in the story.
Tracks featuring the theme: Robin Hood Theme, Rescue, The Sheriff Gets His Man, Outlaws, Chasing The Nightwatchman, A Noble Deed, Gisborne’s Trap, Shooting Pies, Silver Arrow, Lucky George, Robin Hood End Credits.

 

Robin’s Action Theme (a.k.a Robin’s Heroics)

Robin is also given a secondary theme, derived from his main one, that is used during most action sequences in the show. It is comprised of two phrases: the first one (1’00 in Gisborne’s Trap, for example) acts as an introduction to the second one (1’25 in Gisborne’s Trap), which starts with the same four notes as Robin’s Fanfare before continuing in a more action-oriented direction. This melody is generally followed by Robin’s Theme, which functions as a climax once the outlaws are victorious or manage to escape from the Sheriff and his men.
Tracks featuring the theme: Rescue, Gisborne’s Trap.

 

Marian’s Theme (a.k.a. Love Theme From Robin Hood)

The second musical identity of the show, the romantic theme for Marian (which is derived from Robin’s Theme) is another prominent idea in the score. The theme not only symbolizes the character, but also the love between her and Robin. It is usually played in a soft and gentle manner (Proving His Innocence), and is often performed on an acoustic guitar in the first few episodes (Marian’s Theme), but it is also given some sweeping and lush statements (Rescue) and sometimes goes through darker variations when she is in a dangerous situation (Marian’s Punishment). The music for the Nightwatchman (Marian’s alter ego) offers action renditions of her theme as well. Some of the incidental music underscoring scenes between Marian and Robin seems to be inspired by that theme, too (Your Eyes, Different Directions).
Tracks featuring the theme: Robin Hood Theme, Marian’s Theme, Rescue, Proving His Innocence, Shooting Pies, Robin And Marian, Marian’s Punishment, The Nightwatchman, No Way Out, I Never Told Her I Loved Her, Robin Hood End Credits.

 

The Evil Forces Theme

Used interchangeably for the Sheriff Of Nottingham and Guy Of Gisborne, as well as every other antagonist in the show, the Evil Forces Theme is a brooding, menacing melody that represents the dark side of the score. The third most used thematic idea in the show, it is in direct opposition to Robin’s Theme in a lot of scenes (Rescue), often performed in an aggressive, vigorous way whenever the villains lead a full-on assault on the outlaws (Gisborne’s Trap), but sometimes going through more subdued and devious variations (Proving His Innocence) as well.

While both the Sheriff and Gisborne each have their own respective thematic ideas, the Evil Forces Theme is also utilized by the composer for the two characters as a way to musically represent the “brains and brawn” dynamic between them, the more subtler statements generally underscoring scenes wit the Sheriff, while the more action-oriented readings accompany Gisborne’s evil deeds. Moreover, it is used more prominently than the respective themes for these characters, as a way to create one overarching musical identity for the villains of the story.
Tracks featuring the theme: Locksley, Rescue, Proving His Innocence, Gisborne’s Trap, The Sheriff’s Plan.

 

The Sheriff’s Theme

The Sheriff Of Nottingham is represented by a cunning and elusive melody evoking the slyness of the character as well as his deceitful methods and twisted personality. The theme does not go through a lot of variations in the score, instead often performed and orchestrated in the same vein, in a way reflecting the unchanging nature of the character, always staying true to himself.
Track featuring the theme: The Sheriff Gets His Man.

 

The Sheriff’s Outline Figure

Along with the main musical identity for the character, Price added a motif of sorts to the Sheriff’s thematic repertoire. This dissonant three-note melody is often played underneath the theme for the character or is used to evoke it without actually quoting it.
Track featuring the theme: Marian’s Punishment.

 

Gisborne’s Theme

The theme for the Sheriff’s lieutenant is a somber musical idea that conveys the duality of the character, torn between his loyalty to the Sheriff and his love for Marian (interestingly, this melody seems to share a faint similarity with Marian’s Theme, sounding almost like a darker, twisted version of it). Usually played in a stern manner (Flush Him Out), it occasionally takes more alluring inflections whenever the character finds himself in presence of Marian and tries to seduce her (Gisborne Woos Marian).
Tracks featuring the theme: Flush Him Out, Silver Arrow, Gisborne Woos Marian.

 

The Nottingham Castle Motif

This bleak motif underscores most scenes involving this location and its dungeons. The melody, which alternates between ascending and descending motions, creates a sense of uneasiness that quite acutely captures the atmosphere of this sinister place.
Tracks featuring the theme: Proving His Innocence, Two Mothers, Where Is She?.

 

The Outlaws’ Motif

Robin’s merry men are also given a musical identity of their own, a three-note motif which plays during their attempts to infiltrate Nottingham Castle or to thwart one of the Sheriff’s plans. It is a rather serious, stern melody, as it underscores only scenes of the outlaws on a mission, never one of the lighter moments of the gang. This motif is generally accompanied by the Outlaws’ Rhythm.
Track featuring the theme: Outlaws.

 

The Outlaws’ Rhythm

Often playing underneath the Outlaws’ Motif, this ostinato-like figure is derived from Little John’s Theme and is generally used as a device to musically convey the furtiveness of the outlaws, who often have to act stealthily to go to Nottingham undetected.
Tracks featuring the theme: Run Master! Run!, Outlaws, Proving His Innocence, Where Is She?, The Sheriff’s Plan, The Nightwatchman.

 

The Outlaws’ Secondary Motif

Price provided the outlaws’ gang with a secondary motif, used sparingly throughout the score (it is only heard three times in the first season). This thematic idea plays whenever the outlaws are in a dangerous situation or are about to get into trouble. While it is accompanied by the Outlaws’ Rhythm in one scene (Where Is She?), its other statements have a string figure playing underneath them, conveying the urgency of the situation.
Tracks featuring the theme: The Sheriff Gets His Man, Where Is She?.

 

The Locksley Theme

The last of the main thematic ideas, the pastoral melody for Robin’s village conveys a sense of nostalgy and innocence that represents not only Robin’s longing for home, but also the peaceful inhabitants of the village. Like Marian’s Theme, this melody is quite aptly derived from Robin’s own theme.
Tracks featuring the theme: Journey Home, Locksley, Marian’s Theme.

 

MINOR THEMATIC IDEAS.

Throughout the first season of the show, Price developed other thematic ideas, most of them of lesser importance compared to the ones previously mentioned as they are not featured as heavily in the score. Indeed, with the exception of two of them (The Sheriff’s Fanfare and Little John’s Theme), these themes each appear in only one episode.

 

The Sheriff’s Fanfare

Price wrote another thematic idea for the character of the Sheriff, a fanfare that accompanies his grandiloquent entrances in the castle courtyard, whether it is for an execution or a public announcement. This pompous ceremonial tune perfectly encapsulates the character’s sense of theatrics and stands in stark contrast to his more subdued theme.
Track featuring the theme: Two Mothers.

 

Little John’s Theme

The theme for Little John is based on the melody of a lullaby sung by Alice, John’s wife, to their son. It is a sweet, tender tune that musically depicts John’s love for his family (From The Rich To The Poor), but it is also used in a more robust manner whenever John makes uses of his strength or threatens a foe (Where Is She?). This theme quite fittingly forms the basis of the Outlaws’ Rhythm, as Little John used to be the leader of the gang.
Tracks featuring the theme: From The Rich To The Poor, Two Mothers, Where is She?.

 

The Nettlestone Motif

The scenes taking place in Nettlestone village in the third episode are accompanied by this serene motif, which consists of a three-note ascending melody, followed by a fourth concluding note. Performed three times in the episode, it is always followed by Robin’s Theme, and thus acts as some sort of build-up to that melody.
Track featuring the theme: A Noble Deed.

 

The Chase Motif

This dynamic brass ostinato is used by Price on two occasions in the third episode, in sequences where Robin and his men try to capture the mysterious Nightwatchman. One could interpret that action melody as a motif for the Nightwatchman itself as well, before the person behind the mask is revealed to be Marian.
Track featuring the theme: Chasing The Nightwatchman.

 

The Hunt Motif

In the third episode of the season, the outlaws’ gang is pursued by a hunting party using hounds, a plan concocted by Gisborne to drive them out of Sherwood Forest. The two scenes presenting a montage of the pursuit are underscored by a relentless brass melody (which is reminiscent of the Nettlestone Motif) supported by a percussion and string rhythm playing beneath it.
Track featuring the theme: Flush Him Out.

 

Annie’s Motif

A very short musical idea depicting the character of Annie and her baby in the fourth episode of the season, this motif, which consists of a rising hopeful melody, is only used twice by Price: first, when the outlaws find Annie’s baby, and then when Allan returns Annie her baby’s shawl.
Track featuring the theme: Where Is She?.

 

Roy’s Theme

Royston White is given a tragic theme in the fourth episode of the show, in which the character is captured by the Sheriff’s men and has to face a difficult choice: kill Robin to save his mother, or let her die by refusing to betray his friend. The sorrowful melody emphasizes the character’s distress in front of that dilemma while also portending his dismal fate at the end of the episode.
Track featuring the theme: Him I Liked.

 

Rowan’s Theme

This mournful motif represents the character of Rowan and his pledge to avenge his father’s death in the fifth episode of the show (the character is also given a secondary, fanfare-like thematic idea, but it was not included on the album). Unlike most of the other minor thematic ideas, this one goes through quite a lot of variations in the score.
Track featuring the theme: Silver Arrow.

 

Lucky George’s Motif

For the swindler Lucky George, who appears in the seventh episode, Price wrote a suave melody that informs the listener on the conniving personality of the character. The sneaky motif is one of the lighter thematic ideas for one of the bad guys in the show, the character being less of an antagonist and more of a humorous con man.
Track featuring the theme: Lucky George.

 

Allan A Dale’s Theme

In the seventh episode of the season, Allan is reunited with his brother, Tom, who is soon the source of many problems for the gang. Andy Price took this opportunity to develop a theme for the relationship between the two brothers, a noble melody that conveys Allan’s desire to help Tom and encourage him to become a better man.
Tracks featuring the theme: He’s My Brother, The Hanging.

 

Much And Eve’s Love Theme

Much’s love theme, like Little John’s theme, is based on a song: The Stars Above, sung by Eve, the woman Much is in love with. This romantic tune, which contains a tinge of sadness (as it represents an impossible love, Eve being forced to flee from Bonchurch after having betrayed the Sheriff), is heard only once, in the ninth episode, since Eve does not reappear later in the show.
Track featuring the theme: A Love That Cannot Be.

 

TRACK-BY-TRACK ANALYSIS

 

The following analysis will be focused on the thematic material and incidental music found in each track of the album program, along with a description of the footage it underscores. A few more additional notes will be provided for some specific tracks to provide supplemental information regarding the differences between the music as heard in the show and the music as presented on album.

 

01. Robin Hood Theme 0’42 features music from the opening credits of every episode

The program opens in grand fashion with a bombastic rendition of Robin’s Fanfare, with horns and trumpets introducing the theme to us. It soon segues into Marian’s Theme, the romantic tune here being performed by strings in a lush statement. Robin’s Theme then returns, with a statement similar to the first one, bringing the track to its conclusion. This music accompanies the opening credits of every episode of the show.
Note: in the first episode of the show, the first statement of Robin’s Theme is preceded by an introduction leading up to it. However, it seems this build-up is actually not part of the original cue, but instead was recorded separately (thus, it was not microedited on the album: rather, the opening credits cue appears as it was written and recorded).
Themes featured in the track: Robin’s Theme, Marian’s Theme.

 

02. Journey Home 0’32 features music from Episode 1 - “Will You Tolerate This?”

Presented here for the first time is the Locksley Theme, played by horns, with a pastoral melody performed by woodwinds as a counterpoint, both heard while Robin and his servant Much are on their way to the village. The music here evokes the nostalgy felt by Robin as he is about to return home after a long absence. The cue comes to an end when the two travellers arrive at a fuller’s barn and agree to help him with his work in exchange for some food.
Theme featured in the track: The Locksley Theme.

 

03. Run Master! Run! 1’03 features music from Episode 1 - “Will You Tolerate This?”

This action-oriented track (chronologically taking place before Journey Home) starts with an aggressive brass and percussion ostinato which underscores the scene where Robin and Much are chased by the Sheriff’s men in Sherwood Forest, after having threatened them in order to rescue Allan A Dale. The melody soon morphs into a proto-version of the Outlaws’ Rhythm, a musical indication that the two friends are now considered renegades by the men chasing them, while also foreshadowing the events to come.
Tension increases as the horsemen close in on the two friends, before the dynamic material suddenly comes to a halt right when Robin and Much manage to find a place to hide and the riders get past them. However, just as the two friends seem safe, the last of the horsemen soon appears and starts searching the area, with suspenseful strings arising at that very moment. After a while, he finally decides to turn around and join the rest of his group, the strings making way for a brass glissando to inform us that the heroes are out of harm’s way.
Theme featured in the track: The Outlaws’ Rhythm.

 

04. Locksley 2’04 features music from Episode 1 - “Will You Tolerate This?”

Strings bring back the Locksley Theme at the beginning of this track, heralding Robin’s arrival at his hometown. The melody once again conveys the feeling of nostalgia of the character as he contemplates his village. When Much and him enter in Locksley and people flee in front of them, a subdued rendition of the Evil Forces Theme is heard, hinting at the lurking threat unbeknownst to the two friends, but represented by the sentinel in a tower located in the villlage.
The theme soon fades away, and segues into sorrowful music performed by a recorder emphasizing the affliction suffered by the villagers as Robin and Much learn from Dan Scarlett what happened while they were away. This material is abruptly interrupted by a harsher, more determined statement of the Evil Forces Theme underscoring Gisborne’s brash entrance in the village, along with his men. The theme keeps on playing over Gisborne’s speech to the villagers, informing them he and his men are looking for stolen sacks of flour, with the music stopping as Robin intervenes.
Themes featured in the track: The Locksley Theme, The Evil Forces Theme.

 

05. Marian’s Theme 1’23 features music from Episode 1 - “Will You Tolerate This?”

A short string introduction leads us straight into a rendition of Marian’s Theme, here performed by an acoustic guitar, as the character makes her first appearance on screen. After she and her father drive Robin and Much away from Knighton Hall, the two friends decide to return to Locksley, leading to yet another variation on the theme for the village, this time the soft melody being played by woodwinds.
Note: the string introduction is not heard in the episode, and it seems it would not fit in the scene as it appears in the final cut, so it is possible the footage it was meant to underscore was deleted.
Themes featured in the track: Marian’s Theme, Locksley Theme.

 

06. Your Eyes 0’53 features music from Episode 1 - “Will You Tolerate This?” and Episode 7 - “Brothers In Arms”

This brief track, which consists only of incidental music, combines material from two different episodes. The first cue is a romantic string tune, slightly reminiscent of Marian’s Theme, playing over a conversation between Robin and Marian in one of the corridors of Nottingham Castle. The second cue (heard in the seventh episode of the season) offers more playful music performed by woodwinds as Robin is visiting Marian at Knighton Hall.
Themes featured in the track: -

 

07. Rescue 3’13 features music from Episode 1 - “Will You Tolerate This?”

The first big setpiece in the score opens with a bang, a brassy rendition of the Evil Forces Theme announcing the Sheriff’s victory as the execution of Will and Luke Scarlett, Allan A Dale and Benedict Giddens is being carried out. But Robin cannot stand idly by and decides to come to their rescue: this marks the entrance of his action theme into the score, the heroic melody performed by brass and percussion accompanying his dashing attempt to save his friends.
The motif is cut short by the Evil Forces Theme when the Sheriff informs Robin that his men are about to throw Much from the battlements. Our hero manages to save his friend, his theme being heard briefly before the action theme returns once Much is out of harm’s way. It is unfortunately interrupted a second time as one of the Sheriff’s bowmen is about to shoot an unarmed Robin, but Marian soon intervenes, a sweeping string statement of her own theme underscoring her gesture.
Robin’s Action Theme returns when he and his men try to flee from Nottingham on horseback, with the Evil Forces Theme once again taking its place when archers are here to stop them at the town gate. But as Robin and his friends decide to charge them and manage to narrowly escape from the town, a build-up leads to a victorious rendition of his theme, before the music finally slows down with a gentler string phrase as we see the heroes resting in Sherwood Forest.
Themes featured in the track: The Evil Forces Theme, Robin’s Action Theme, Robin’s Theme, Marian’s Theme.

 

08. The Sheriff Gets His Man 3’08 features music from Episode 2 - “Sheriff Got Your Tongue?”

After the events of the first episode, The Sheriff Of Nottingham is looking for Robin. In order to find him, he decides to go to Locksley and threatens the villagers to cut their tongues if they do not tell him where he is. That sequence is the first one in which the theme for the Sheriff is heard. The sinister melody for the character, played by low-register woodwinds, covers the first half of this track, as he tries to convince the villagers to help him find their lord.
Robin and Much, who have been captured by the outlaws in the previous episode, are watching the events unfold from afar, with Royston White and Little John wondering if they should bring their captive to the Sheriff. As they are debating, an urgent string rhythm starts playing, soon followed by the Outlaws’ Secondary Motif. That motif keeps on building as the men are arguing, but when Little John’s wife, Alice, is about to have her tongue cut by one of the Sheriff’s men and Robin convinces the outlaw to release him so he can rescue her with his bow and arrow, Robin’s Fanfare makes a resounding entrance into the track. The theme underscores Robin’s perfect shot, but the music quickly turns more hesitant when Robin decides to give himself up but Much refuses to let him leave (a clarinet, representing the character in this episode, being heard at that moment). As the men finally part ways and Robin walks towards the Sheriff, his theme reappears, more defiant than ever.
Themes featured in the track: The Sheriff’s Theme, The Outlaws’ Secondary Motif, Robin’s Theme.

 

09. Scaling The Walls 0’58 features music from Episode 2 - “Sheriff Got Your Tongue?”

Ominous music underscores a scene between Marian and Gisborne taking place in Knighton Hall, before slowly making way for more mysterious material featuring tremolo strings as we see Much walking near the walls of Nottingham, determined to rescue his master, locked in the castle’s dungeons. He soon sees a ladder, and comes up with the idea of climbing the battlements. His unsuccessful attempt is accompanied by a comical motif performed by a clarinet (once again musically representing the character).
Themes featured in the track: -

 

10. Outlaws 2’17 features music from Episode 2 - “Sheriff Got Your Tongue?”

Having been freed from the dungeons by his loyal servant Much, Robin is reunited with his friends in the castle courtyard to the sound of the Outlaws’ Rhythm performed by contrabassoons, with brass soon playing the motif for the gang over it. While the alarm is being raised, our hero informs his men he wants to have a word with the Sheriff before leaving the castle, which leads to the appearance of an oboe variation of Robin’s Theme when Much worries his master could die in the attempt. But Robin has already made up his mind, and leaves his friend in dismay.
The following sequence, in which Robin and Roy try to get to the Sheriff’s quarters while the gang is forced to fight the castle guards in the courtyard, is underscored by an energetic percussion and string ostinato under brass playing the first few notes of Robin’s Theme over and over again. The cue ends with a complete rendition of the theme, with the trumpets slowly fading away, as Robin arrives in front of the Sheriff’s bedchamber.
Themes featured in the track: The Outlaws’ Rhythm, The Outlaws’ Motif, Robin’s Theme.

 

11. From The Rich To The Poor 1’21 features music from Episode 2 - “Sheriff Got Your Tongue?”

For the montage showing the outlaws distributing food to various villages, Price developed the melody of the lullaby sung by Alice to Little John’s son earlier in the episode and turned it into a fully-fledged theme. The tune is first played by strings, but is then accompanied by a recorder during its second statement.
Note: the version of that cue heard in the show does not feature the recorder, so it would appear that instrument was recorded separately, and it was decided not to include it in the final version of the episode.
Theme featured in the track: Little John’s Theme.

 

12. Chasing The Nightwatchman 0’33 features music from Episode 3 - “Who Shot The Sheriff?”

This short track starts abruptly with a brassy hectic action ostinato playing as Robin and his men try to capture the Nightwatchman, a mysterious archer who supposedly shot Joderic, a bailiff who was visiting the village of Nettlestone. This Chase Motif is punctuated by Robin’s Theme when the character is about to get his hands on the hooded marksman. The theme, however, is not fully quoted, as Robin is knocked flat on his back by the Nightwatchman, who manages to escape while Much rushes to his master’s side to see if he is all right.
Themes featured in the track: The Chase Motif, Robin’s Theme.

 

13. Flush Him Out 1’10 features music from Episode 3 - “Who Shot The Sheriff?”

A brooding variation of Gisborne’s theme plays over a speech the character gives to a hunting party gathered to drive the outlaws out of Sherwood Forest. Once he has given his instructions, the hunters and their dogs start the pursuit. The music then builds to a percussive and brassy rendition of the Hunt Motif, underscoring the following montage, showing Robin and his men trying to escape from the hunters in the forest.
Themes featured in the track: Gisborne’s Theme, The Hunt Motif.

 

14. Proving His Innocence 2’35 features music from Episode 3 - “Who Shot The Sheriff?”

As Marian tries to determine who could be behind the killings that happened in Nettlestone and Nottingham, a surprisingly soft setting of the Evil Forces Theme performed by woodwinds is heard. It segues into Marian’s Theme when she has a discussion with Joe Lacey, one of the castle guards, about Robin’s innocence.
After this, the Outlaws’ Rhythm sneaks into the track as we see Allan creating a diversion for Robin to infiltrate the castle. The melody is quickly replaced by the Nottingham Castle Motif, with Robin making his way through the corridors of the place. The cue ends with a brass glissando when he reaches the Sheriff’s bedchamber.
Themes featured in the track: The Evil Forces Theme, Marian’s Theme, The Outlaws’ Rhythm, The Nottingham Castle Motif.

 

15. A Noble Deed 1’33 features music from Episode 3 - “Who Shot The Sheriff?”

Robin finally cleared his name after it was revealed he was not the one responsible for the killings. He and his men return to Nettlestone village as heroes. The first action they take is to reopen the mill closed by the Sheriff’s men. This “noble deed” is scored by Price with the Nettlestone Motif, the uplifting melody expressing life returning to normal. It leads into a triumphant setting of Robin’s Theme as Little John removes the wood slats from the door of the mill. The Nettlestone Motif is heard once more before fading away.
Themes featured in the track: The Nettlestone Motif, Robin’s Theme.

 

16. Gisborne’s Trap 2’02 features music from Episode 4 - “Parent Hood”

After having stolen horses from the Sheriff’s men, the outlaws realize the horseshoes were marked, an idea devised by Gisborne to trap them. Woodwinds play a foreboding melody as the outlaws make the discovery, but when it is revealed Gisborne already has them surrounded, the Evil Forces Theme is heard in all its malevolent glory. Robin and his men of course do not intend to surrender, and the fight starts with a short statement of his main theme before his action theme covers the rest of the sequence. This cue comes to an end when Roy is captured by Gisborne and his men, and brought to Nottingham.
Themes featured in the track: The Evil Forces Theme, Robin’s Theme, Robin’s Action Theme.

 

17. Shooting Pies 1’56 features music from Episode 4 - “Parent Hood”

Marian is determined to bring food to the inhabitants of Clun, a village that has been placed under quarantine by the Sheriff, but she is caught by his men in front of the village, a wary rendition of her theme signaling her anguish at that moment. Of course, Robin comes to her rescue along with his theme, performed in a more restrained manner than usual. It fades away while a quirky woodwind motif sets in with staccato strings beneath it. Robin’s Theme soon returns, leading up to a pastoral melody played by woodwinds and strings as the character uses his arrows to send food to the villagers of Clun.

Note: the part from 0’31 to 0’57 was not used in the episode.
Themes featured in the track: Marian’s Theme, Robin’s Theme.

 

18. Robin And Marian 2’07 features music from Episode 4 - “Parent Hood”

A string phrase builds up to a rendition of Marian’s Theme, as the character is healing one of Robin’s wounds. The music soon turns sour when the two lovers have an argument about how to deal with the situation in England, and about their own relationship. The theme then returns in a more desperate manner once it becomes clear they cannot come to an understanding, with the cue ending on a somber note when Marian decides to leave the small cottage Robin and his men were staying in.
Theme featured in the track: Marian’s Theme.

 

19. Marian’s Punishment 1’50 features music from Episode 4 - “Parent Hood”

Having heard of Marian not respecting the quarantine imposed to the village of Clun, the Sheriff pays her a visit at Knighton Hall to tell her she will be punished for her disobedience. His sinister Outline Figure performed by tremolo strings and woodwinds builds to a dark, twisted statement of Marian’s Theme played by brass as her hair are being cut in front of the people of Nottingham in the castle courtyard, as a public humiliation.
Themes featured in the track: The Sheriff’s Outline Figure, Marian’s Theme.

 

20. Two Mothers 3’10 features music from Episode 1 - “Will You Tolerate This?” and Episode 4 - “Parent Hood”

This track is comprised of two cues. The first one, from the fourth episode of the show, opens with low-register strings leading up to a sorrowful rendition of Little John’s Theme after the character learns Roy betrayed them and attempted to kill Robin. The horns performing the theme soon die down while the strings melody continues for a bit as the outlaws try to understand Roy’s gesture.
The second cue (from the first episode) then starts, with a cor anglais playing an eerie melody in the scene where Robin tries to find with Marian and Edward (her father) a way to free his friends who are to be hanged. Strings join in, and become more agitated when brass play what sounds like a proto-version of the Outlaws’ Motif as we see Robin lost in his thoughts in front of the fireplace in Locksley Manor. As the day of the hanging dawns, Robin and Much walk in the castle courtyard to the sound of the dreary Nottingham Castle Motif. But soon, the Sheriff’s Fanfare heralds the character’s ostentatious arrival.

Note: the part from 0'45 to 0'57 was not used in the episode.
Themes featured in the track: Little John’s Theme, The Nottingham Castle Motif, The Sheriff’s Fanfare.

 

21. Where Is She? 2’10 features music from Episode 4 - “Parent Hood”

Robin and his men decide to help Roy free his mother and furtively infiltrate Nottingham Castle. They are accompanied by the Outlaws’ Rhythm, here performed by woodwinds as they try to get to the dungeons, with the secondary motif for the gang soon joining it. The two thematic ideas are briefly interrupted by Annie’s Motif when Allan gives the character her baby’s shawl.
The Outlaws’ Rhythm returns after that, as we see them arriving in front of the door to the dungeons. Strings suddenly crescendo, followed by brass bringing Little John’s Theme when he smashes the door. We then hear the Nottingham Castle Motif on woodwinds as the outlaws try to find the cell Mary (Roy’s mother) is in. The melody ends with a timpani roll when it is revealed the Sheriff and his men are there to greet them.
Themes featured in the track: The Outlaws’ Rhythm, The Outlaws Secondary Motif, Annie’s Motif, Little John’s Theme, The Nottingham Castle Motif.

 

22. Him I Liked 1’34 features music from Episode 4 - “Parent Hood”

Roy decides to sacrifice himself to give his friends a chance to bring his mother to safety. His death is underscored by an elegiac string performance of his own theme, the heart-wrenching melody emphasizing the horror and shock felt by the outlaws. The music also underscores the following scene, in which the outlaws are seen mourning their friend in Sherwood Forest.
Theme featured in the track: Roy’s Theme.

 

23. Different Directions 0’51 features music from Episode 4 - “Parent Hood”

As the outlaws return Annie to her baby, and Robin and Marian share a few words, an incidental melody (reminiscent of Marian’s Theme) arises, the serene music making for a perfect accompaniment to the bittersweet ending of the episode.
Themes featured in the track: -

 

24. Silver Arrow 1’58 features music from Episode 5 - “Turk Flu”

Staccato strings are heard as a giddily excited Robin fools around with his bow and arrow in the outlaws’ camp. Playful woodwinds then perform the first few notes of his theme, but are slowly replaced by the more plaintive theme for Rowan when we see him standing in front of his father’s grave. As he pledges to avenge his death (caused by Gisborne), the Nightwatchman appears to give his family some food, before riding away.
However, Gisborne, who witnessed the scene, suddenly appears and startles the horse, horn stabs signaling the sudden turn of events as the Nightwatchman falls on the ground. Brass give us Gisborne’s Theme when the character threatens the dismounted rider, but a percussion hit cuts it short after Marian slaps him and manages to get back on her horse, strings performing a melody hinting at her theme during her escape.
Themes featured in the track: Robin’s Theme, Rowan’s Theme, Gisborne’s Theme.

 

25. Gisborne Woos Marian 1’29 features music from Episode 5 - “Turk Flu”

A bass clarinet opens this track with a seductive statement of Gisborne’s Theme as the character visits Marian at Knighton Hall to present her with a gift. Clarinets then take the lead and perform an extensive reading of the theme over the rest of the scene, during which Gisborne invites Marian to the Sheriff’s Fair.
Theme featured in the track: Gisborne’s Theme.

 

26. The Sheriff’s Plan 2’19 features music from Episode 5 - “Turk Flu”

Featured here is a lengthy, sly rendition of the Evil Forces Theme on strings, with a drum beat and woodwinds ostinato beneath it, this variant playing in the scene where the Sheriff Of Nottingham and Guy Of Gisborne oversee the arrival of Saracen slaves at Treeton Mine, while the outlaws concoct a plan to free the slaves and close the iron mine once and for all.
The melody is interrupted shortly when we are shown Robin preventing Rowan from trying to murder Gisborne, the Outlaws’ Rhythm being briefly heard at that moment, before segueing into the variant of The Evil Forces Theme, performed once more in the same manner up until the end of the sequence.
Themes featured in the track: The Evil Forces Theme, The Outlaws’ Rhythm.

 

27. A Love That Cannot Be 1’20 features music from Episode 9 - “A Thing Or Two About Loyalty”

This track presents us with a string performance of the romantic melody of the song The Stars Above, sung by Eve, a servant at Bonchurch Lodge Much becomes infatuated with. The music here acts as a love theme for the two characters in the episode, heard when Eve has to flee from Bonchurch to go into hiding after she betrayed the Sheriff, who she was working for.
Theme featured in the track: Much And Eve’s Love Theme.

 

28. Lucky George 2’08 features music from Episode 7 - “Brothers In Arms”

A flute legato leads us straight into the first rendition of Lucky George’s Motif, the melody here underscoring the character’s speech to the villagers of Locksley, offering to give them money in exchange for trinkets. Lucky George then travels through Sherwood Forest with the Sheriff’s men and falls into an ambush set up by the outlaws, with an energetic percussive and brassy rendition of Robin’s Theme playing during the attack.
George’s Motif returns as he threatens Robin with a sword when he enters his coach, but it is once again replaced by Robin’s Theme when the two men start duelling. After George seemingly stabs Robin, the music fizzles out before it is revealed to be an act, a whimsical rendition of Robin’s Theme arising when he suddenly knocks George down.
Themes featured in the track: Lucky George’s Motif, Robin’s Theme.

 

29. He’s My Brother 0’57 features music from Episode 7 - “Brothers In Arms”

After Allan’s brother, Tom, tried to steal money from Marian’s father and ended up wounding him in the attempt, Robin considers kicking him out of the gang. Allan then tries to change Robin’s mind. His plea is set to music with a string performance of his theme evoking Allan’s love for his brother and his unwillingness to abandon him.
Theme featured in the track: Allan A Dale’s Theme.

 

30. The Nightwatchman 1’14 features music from Episode 7 - “Brothers In Arms”

A string setting of the Outlaws’ Rhythm opens this track as Marian puts on her Nightwatchman costume (the use of the motif here possibly suggesting she herself is one of the outlaws), before trumpets and percussion join in for a martial rendition of her own theme when she fights Tom and his friends after they invaded her home and wounded her father. The track comes to an end as Robin and his men arrive at Knighton Hall to stop the senseless battle.
Themes featured in the track: The Outlaws’ Rhythm, Marian’s Theme.

 

31. The Hanging 1’13 features music from Episode 7 - “Brothers In Arms”

Robin and his men plan on rescuing Tom after he has been captured by the Sheriff’s men and is about to be hanged. Unfortunately, as they found themselves in the castle courtyard during a public announcement of the Sheriff, he reveals the hanging has been brought forward by one hour. A devastating string performance of Allan’s theme then erupts as he hopelessly watches his brother’s body hanging by the neck. The theme soon vanishes into an aleatoric passage ending as the Sheriff’s returns into the castle, leaving the outlaws aghast.
Theme featured in the track: Allan A Dale’s Theme.

 

32. No Way Out 2’22 features music from Episode 7 - “Brothers In Arms”

Gisborne proposes Marian in marriage to protect her from the Sheriff’s wrath, who thinks she is in league with the outlaws. This difficult situation is underscored by a desperate melody as Marian tries to find a way out of this. A plucked string then leads to a suspended note when Gisborne forces her to answer. After she finally accepts to marry him (under certain conditions), an abridged rendition of her theme emerges, playing over a shot of a distressed Robin, who was hiding nearby, before slowly fading away.
Theme featured in the track: Marian’s Theme.

 

33. I Never Told Her I Loved Her 1’17 features music from Episode 12 - “The Return Of The King”

This penultimate track consists of an elegiac performance of Marian’s Theme heard as Robin carries his loved one to the outlaws’ cave after she has been mortally wounded by Gisborne, with plaintive strings conveying Robin’s despair at the thought of losing her.
Theme featured in the track: Marian’s Theme.

 

34. Robin Hood End Credits 1’27 features music from the end credits of every episode

Horns start playing the beginning of Robin’s Theme, and are soon joined by a cor anglais and then a trumpet. It segues directly into an agitated string build-up which leads straight into the renditions of Robin and Marian’s themes as heard in the opening credits.
Note: it appears this track is basically a combination of the opening credits cue along with a different opening. However, it should be noted there are no less than three different versions of that opening. The first one, heard at the end of the second episode of the show, simply consists of the strings and horns build-up heard from 0’34 to 0’36 in the track (but with a clean opening). The second, longer version is the one heard on the album, with the Robin’s Theme statement before the build-up (which seems to have been recorded separately): this version was not used in any episode. Finally, the third and last version is first heard in the sixth episode: it starts with the same Robin’s Theme statement as heard on album, but then segues into a different, shorter strings build-up (which sounds similar to the intro leading up to the opening credits cue in the first episode).
Themes featured in the track: Robin’s Theme, Marian’s Theme.

 

INDEX

 

TRACKLIST BY EPISODES.

This section presents the music from each track on the album listed under the episode it was written for, in chronological order. This allows to appreciate how well the score for each episode was represented on the album, and helps having a better overview of the evolution of the music throughout the first season. It is also a good way to more easily spot the thematic material exclusive to each episode.

As a reminder: only the first seven episodes were given complete original scores (approximately 25 to 30 minutes long each). Episode 8, Episode 11 and Episode 13 had no original music written for them (music from the other episodes were tracked in them) and Episode 9, Episode 10 and Episode 12 only had a select few cues specifically recorded for them (all in all, four cues were written for those three episodes).

 

Spoiler

Episode 01 - “Will You Tolerate This?”

Amount of music on the album: 10’48

 

03. Run Master! Run! 1’03
02. Journey Home 0’32
04. Locksley 2’04
05. Marian’s Theme 1’23
06. Your Eyes [0’00-0’26]
20. Two Mothers [1’03-End]
07. Rescue 3’13

 

Episode 02 - “Sheriff Got Your Tongue?”
Amount of music on the album: 7’44

 

08. The Sheriff Gets His Man 3’08
09. Scaling The Walls 0’58
10. Outlaws 2’17
11. From The Rich To The Poor 1’21

 

Episode 03 - “Who Shot The Sheriff?”
Amount of music on the album: 5’51

 

12. Chasing The Nightwatchman 0’33
13. Flush Him Out 1’10
14. Proving His Innocence 2’35
15. A Noble Deed 1’33

 

Episode 04 - “Parent Hood”
Amount of music on the album: 14’33

 

16. Gisborne’s Trap 2’02
17. Shooting Pies 1’56
18. Robin And Marian 2’07
19. Marian’s Punishment 1’50
20. Two Mothers [0’00-1’03]
21. Where Is She? 3’10
22. Him I Liked 1’34
23. Different Directions 0’51

 

Episode 05 - “Turk Flu”
Amount of music on the album: 5’46

 

24. Silver Arrow 1’58
25. Gisborne Woos Marian 1’29
26. The Sheriff’s Plan 2’19

 

Episode 06 - “The Tax Man Cometh”
Amount of music on the album: -

 

-

 

Episode 07 - “Brothers In Arms”
Amount of music on the album: 7’24

 

28. Lucky George 2’08
30. The Nightwatchman 1’14
29. He’s My Brother 0’57
06. Your Eyes [0’26-End]
31. The Hanging 1’13
32. No Way Out 2’22

 

Episode 08 - “Tattoo? What Tattoo?”
Amount of music on the album: -

 

-

 

Episode 09 - “A Thing Or Two About Loyalty”
Amount of music on the album: 1’20

 

27. A Love That Cannot Be 1’20

 

Episode 10 - “Peace? Off!”
Amount of music on the album: -

 

-

 

Episode 11 - “Dead Man Walking”
Amount of music on the album: -

 

-

 

Episode 12 - “The Return Of The King”
Amount of music on the album: 1’17

 

33. I Never Told Her I Loved Her 1’17

 

Episode 13 - “A Clue? No!”
Amount of music on the album: -

 

-

 

All Episodes
Amount of music on the album: 2’09

 

01. Robin Hood Theme 0’42
34. Robin Hood End Credits 1’27

 

THEMATIC BREAKDOWN.

Here are listed all the themes that appear in each track from the album program, in the order in which they are heard in said track (only the first statement of each theme will be listed, even if the theme is heard more than once in the track). This thematic breakdown allows to see the evolution of the thematic material on the album and also to get a better grasp of the music narrative by hearing how the themes interact with one another.

 

Spoiler

01. Robin Hood Theme
features 2 themes

 

- Robin Hood Theme
- Marian’s Theme

 

02. Journey Home
features 1 theme

 

- The Locksley Theme

 

03. Run Master! Run!
features 1 theme

 

- The Outlaws’ Rhythm

 

04. Locksley
features 2 themes

 

- The Locksley Theme
- The Evil Forces Theme

 

05. Marian’s Theme
features 2 themes

 

- Marian’s Theme
- The Locksley Theme

 

06. Your Eyes
features no theme

 

-

 

07. Rescue
features 4 themes

 

- The Evil Forces Theme
- Robin’s Action Theme
- Robin’s Theme
- Marian’s Theme

 

08. The Sheriff Gets His Man
features 3 themes

 

- The Sheriff’s Theme
- The Outlaws’ Secondary Motif
- Robin’s Theme

 

09. Scaling The Walls
features no theme

 

-

 

10. Outlaws
features 3 themes

 

- The Outlaws’ Rhythm
- The Outlaws’ Motif
- Robin’s Theme

 

11. From The Rich To The Poor
features 1 theme

 

- Little John’s Theme

 

12. Chasing The Nightwatchman
features 2 themes

 

- The Chase Motif
- Robin’s Theme

 

13. Flush Him Out
features 2 themes

 

- Gisborne’s Theme
- The Hunt Motif

 

14. Proving His Innocence
features 4 themes

 

- The Evil Forces Theme
- Marian’s Theme
- The Outlaws’ Rhythm
- The Nottingham Castle Motif

 

15. A Noble Deed
features 2 themes

 

- The Nettlestone Motif
- Robin’s Theme

 

16. Gisborne’s Trap
features 3 themes

 

- The Evil Forces Theme
- Robin’s Theme
- Robin’s Action Theme

 

17. Shooting Pies
features 2 themes

 

- Marian’s Theme
- Robin’s Theme

 

18. Robin And Marian
features 1 theme

 

- Marian’s Theme

 

19. Marian’s Punishment
features 2 themes

 

- The Sheriff’s Outline Figure
- Marian’s Theme

 

20. Two Mothers
features 3 themes

 

- Little John’s Theme
- The Nottingham Castle Motif
- The Sheriff’s Fanfare

 

21. Where Is She?
features 5 themes

 

- The Outlaws’ Rhythm
- The Outlaws’ Secondary Motif
- Annie’s Motif
- Little John’s Theme
- The Nottingham Castle Motif

 

22. Him I Liked
features 1 theme

 

- Roy’s Theme

 

23. Different Directions
features no theme

 

-

 

24. Silver Arrow
features 3 themes

 

- Robin’s Theme
- Rowan’s Theme
- Gisborne’s Theme

 

25. Gisborne Woos Marian
features 1 theme

 

- Gisborne’s Theme

 

26. The Sheriff’s Plan
features 2 themes

 

- The Evil Forces Theme
- The Outlaws’ Rhythm

 

27. A Love That Cannot Be
features 1 theme

 

- Much And Eve’s Love Theme

 

28. Lucky George
features 2 themes

 

- Lucky George’s Motif
- Robin’s Theme

 

29. He’s My Brother
features 1 theme

 

- Allan A Dale’s Theme

 

30. The Nightwatchman
features 2 themes

 

- The Outlaws’ Rhythm
- Marian’s Theme

 

31. The Hanging
features 1 theme

 

- Allan A Dale’s Theme

 

32. No Way Out
features 1 theme

 

- Marian’s Theme

 

33. I Never Told Her I Loved Her
features 1 theme

 

- Marian’s Theme

 

34. Robin Hood End Credits
features 2 themes

 

- Robin’s Theme
- Marian’s Theme

 

LIST OF THEMES.

This final section presents a list of all the tracks each theme appears in, which gives an idea about the prominence of each one on the album and also allows for a comparison of the different variations they go through. The themes are presented in the same order as in the “The Themes Of Robin Hood” section: first, there are the major thematic ideas (regrouped by characters or group of characters), and then the minor thematic ideas (listed in the order in which they first appear in the show). Note that some of those themes are more prominent in the show but are not well represented on the album (that is the case for example of the Sheriff’s Theme and the Outlaws’ Motif).

 

Spoiler

Robin’s Theme
featured in 11 tracks

 

01. Robin Hood Theme
07. Rescue
08. The Sheriff Gets His Man
10. Outlaws
12. Chasing The Nightwatchman
15. A Noble Deed
16. Gisborne’s Trap
17. Shooting Pies
24. Silver Arrow
28. Lucky George
34. Robin Hood End Credits

 

Robin’s Action Theme (a.k.a. Robin’s Heroics)
featured in 2 tracks

 

07. Rescue
16. Gisborne’s Trap

 

Marian’s Theme (a.k.a. Love Theme From Robin Hood)
featured in 11 tracks

 

01. Robin Hood Theme
05. Marian’s Theme
07. Rescue
14. Proving His Innocence
17. Shooting Pies
18. Robin And Marian
19. Marian’s Punishment
30. The Nightwatchman
32. No Way Out
33. I Never Told Her I Loved Her
34. Robin Hood End Credits

 

The Evil Forces Theme
featured in 5 tracks

 

04. Locksley
07. Rescue
14. Proving His Innocence
16. Gisborne’s Trap
26. The Sheriff’s Plan

 

The Sheriff’s Theme
featured in 1 track

 

08. The Sheriff Gets His Man

 

The Sheriff’s Outline Figure
featured in 1 track

 

19. Marian’s Punishment

 

Gisborne’s Theme
featured in 3 tracks

 

13. Flush Him Out
24. Silver Arrow
25. Gisborne Woos Marian

 

The Nottingham Castle Motif
featured in 3 tracks

 

14. Proving His Innocence
20. Two Mothers
21. Where Is She?

 

The Outlaws’ Motif
featured in 1 track

 

10. Outlaws

 

The Outlaws’ Rhythm

featured in 6 tracks

 

03. Run Master! Run!
10. Outlaws
14. Proving His Innocence
21. Where Is She?
26. The Sheriff’s Plan
30. The Nightwatchman

 

The Outlaws’ Secondary Motif
featured in 2 tracks

 

08. The Sheriff Gets His Man
21. Where Is She?

 

The Locksley Theme
featured in 3 tracks

 

02. Journey Home
04. Locksley
05. Marian’s Theme

 

The Sheriff’s Fanfare
featured in 1 track

 

20. Two Mothers

 

Little John’s Theme
featured in 3 tracks

 

11. From The Rich To The Poor
20. Two Mothers
21. Where Is She?

 

The Nettlestone Motif
featured in 1 track

 

15. A Noble Deed

 

The Chase Motif
featured in 1 track

 

12. Chasing The Nightwatchman

 

The Hunt Motif
featured in 1 track

 

13. Flush Him Out

 

Annie’s Motif
featured in 1 track

 

21. Where Is She?

 

Roy’s Theme
featured in 1 track

 

22. Him I Liked

 

Rowan’s Theme
featured in 1 track

 

24. Silver Arrow

 

Lucky George’s Motif
featured in 1 track

 

28. Lucky George

 

Allan A Dale’s Theme
featured in 2 tracks

 

29. He’s My Brother
31. The Hanging

 

Much And Eve’s Love Theme
featured in 1 track

 

27. A Love That Cannot Be

 

MATERIAL AVAILABLE ON THE OFFICIAL WEBSITE OF THE COMPOSER.

On the official website of Andy Price are available a few cues from the show: some of them can be found on the album release, but others are unreleased. Below, you will find a list to all those cues in chronological order, along with an additional one (Escape From The Castle) found on the website of Dominic Minghella (co-creator of the show). The cues that are completely unreleased, or contain unreleased material, are indicated with an asterisk (or two) next to them.

You can listen to an expanded edit combining those unreleased cues, the music from the album release as well as music from the DVD menus and extras here.

 

01. Robin Hood Theme (With Intro)**

02. Run Master! Run!

03. Journey Home

04. Your Eyes

05. The Night Before The Execution (Incomplete)

06. Rescue

07. The Sheriff Gets His Man (Part 1)

08. The Sheriff Gets His Man (Part 2)

09. Down In The Dungeon (Reprise)*

10. Scaling The Walls

11. Lady Marian (Reprise)*

12. Outlaws

13. Escape From The Castle*

14. From The Rich To The Poor

15. Chasing The Nightwatchman

16. Flush him Out

17. Prayer For Matthew*

18. Proving His Innocence (Part 1)

19. A Noble Deed (Reprise)

20. Back At The Camp*

21. Robin And Marian

22. Two Mothers

23. Him I Liked

24. Different Directions

25. Silver Arrow (Part 1)

26. Turk Flu*

27. A Circus Act*

28. Lucky George

29. Tom A Dale*

30. The Nightwatchman

31. He's My Brother

32. A Forlorn Hope* (Incomplete)

33. The Hanging

34. No Way Out

 

**Unreleased cue

**Contains unreleased material

 

*****

 

ANALYSIS OF THE COMPLETE SCORE FOR SEASON ONE

Coming back (hopefully) soon...

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I actually thought the OST was a very nice listening experience. I definitely appreciated some of the smaller, less important cues being included.

Your review really highlights that despite the little time TV composers often have, their work is incredibly detailed. You clearly have a passion for this score :)

And I too was bummed that there were no further releases. I would guess that maybe the declining ratings dissuaded them from bothering to release more.

I did a few rips myself (ages ago, I need to redo them - yours have much better clarity), of the closing cues for all 3 seasons, and particularly the final few cues from Season 3 are spectacular.

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A very good analysis Bloodboal. And not too long at all. And it is in the right section of the MB as well as the Reviews contains analysis and reviews alike. Sadly I have never had the chance to see the show outside the pilot but I have heard the original soundtrack which is incredibly good TV scoring. Your thematic analysis will be most enlightening when I listen to it next time. :)

P.S. Looking forward to the rest of the analysis.

:music: Journey Home

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On 10/06/2011 at 7:58 PM, Richard Penna said:

I actually thought the OST was a very nice listening experience. I definitely appreciated some of the smaller, less important cues being included.

 

While I think the smaller cues are fine, I would have gladly traded them for other cues such as Escape From The Castle.

 

On 10/06/2011 at 7:58 PM, Richard Penna said:

the final few cues from Season 3 are spectacular.

 

:thumbup:

 

On 10/06/2011 at 8:30 PM, Incanus said:

A very good analysis Bloodboal. And not too long at all. And it is in the right section of the MB as well as the Reviews contains analysis and reviews alike. Sadly I have never had the chance to see the show outside the pilot but I have heard the original soundtrack which is incredibly good TV scoring. Your thematic analysis will be most enlightening when I listen to it next time. :)

P.S. Looking forward to the rest of the analysis.

 

Well, I don't consider it a review, because all I'm saying through my original post is "that score is great" or "amazing" or "mindblowing". That's no real analysis, is it?;)

You should try to watch the show sometimes. It's pretty good. I find the first part of the first season to be horrendous (the pilot in particular. I'm glad it wasn't the first episode I saw, else I would have given up on the show and would have missed all that music!), but it does get better: the second part of season one is decent, and the second season is quite a fun ride. Season 3 finale is worth seeing, too.

 

On 10/06/2011 at 8:38 PM, Prometheus said:
Quote
Robin Hood TV music at its finest!

Corrected. ;)

 

Well, there isn't much competition, is there? The only other Robin Hood TV shows I can think of right now are Robin Of Sherwood and The New Adventures Of Robin Hood, and from what I've heard, these scores have not much to offer.

 

On 10/06/2011 at 8:38 PM, Prometheus said:

It's good, considering, but I don't see how it compares to Korngold, Barry or even Kamen's contributions.

 

Are you saying this only based on the OST, or also the unreleased cues?

If it is based on the OST, then I can understand your point, and I would kind of agree.

If it is based on the OST AND the unreleased cues, then I disagree. I'll rate the complete score above Kamen's score (which I absolutely love, by the way), and Barry's one (need to re-listen to that one, though, don't remember it much). I have yet to listen to Korngold's score

If you haven't listened to the unreleased cues, do so! Like I say in my original post, The Return Of The Nightwatchman, damnit!

 

On 10/06/2011 at 11:10 PM, crocodile said:

I'm not familiar with this music, but an interesting read nontheless.

 

Did you listen to the OST?

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Robin Hood TV music at its finest!

Corrected. ;)

Well, there isn't much competition, is it? The only other Robin Hood TV shows I can think of right now are "Robin Of Sherwood" and "The New Adventures Of Robin Hood", and from what I've heard, this score have not much to offer.

But this does, I'd agree. Though I'd restrain from overselling just yet. I've listened to many tracks, and I'm only mildly impressed.

It's good, considering, but I don't see how it compares to Korngold, Barry or even Kamen's contributions.

Are you saying this only based on the OST, or also the unreleased cues?

If it is based on the OST, then I can understand your point, and I would kind of agree.

If it is based on the OST AND the unreleased cues, then I disagree. I'll rate the complete score above Kamen's score (which I absolutely love, by the way), and Barry's one (need to re-listen to that one, though, don't remember it much). I have yet to listen to Korngold's score.:o

If you haven't listened to the unreleased cues, do so! Like I say in my original post, The Return Of The Nightwatchman ,damnit!

I love your enthusiasm, but I'm not as bowled as you are. 'The Return Of The Nightwatchmen' often struck me as a terrific approximation of John Williams and several others (Henry Mancini's LIFEFORCE came to mind), mostly within those idiomatic chord progressions and use of orchestral colours. I dig the return of the main theme as well - great "F yeah, bring in on bitches!" moment, that's so often missing in modern film and television scores.

It's growing on me, but I think I'll find very hard to put this voiceless Andy Price guy's score up there with iconic, soul stirring works of Eric Wolfgang Korngold, Michael Kamen and the late John Barry (this one's got to be my favourite, and I think it's mix of romantic melancholy, angular brutality, and wistful nostalgia is what does. One of the finest films and scores on that often neglected part of the human experience - old age).

In fact, I think putting this score above any Barry work is an insult (Ok, maybe I'll accept one or two - but still). Even this series's splendid main theme - owes a hell of a lot to John Barry (and John Williams's SUPERMAN too).

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On 11/06/2011 at 0:52 AM, Prometheus said:

But this does, I'd agree. Though I'd restrain from overselling just yet. I've listened to many tracks, and I'm only mildly impressed.

 

Well, "mildly impressed" is better that "not impressed at all", I guess...;)

 

On 11/06/2011 at 0:52 AM, Prometheus said:

I love your enthusiasm, but I'm not as bowled as you are. 'The Return Of The Nightwatchmen' often struck me as a terrific approximation of John Williams and several others (Henry Mancini's LIFEFORCE came to mind), mostly within those idiomatic chord progressions and use of orchestral colours. I dig the return of the main theme as well - great "F yeah, bring in on bitches!" moment, that's so often missing in modern film and television scores.

It's growing on me, but I think I'll find very hard to put this voiceless Andy Price guy's score up there with iconic, soul stirring works of Eric Wolfgang Korngold, Michael Kamen and the late John Barry (this one's got to be my favourite, and I think it's mix of romantic melancholy, angular brutality, and wistful nostalgia is what does. One of the finest films and scores on that often neglected part of the human experience - old age).

In fact, I think putting this score above any Barry work is an insult (Ok, maybe I'll accept one or two - but still). Even this series's splendid main theme - owes a hell of a lot to John Barry (and John Williams's SUPERMAN too).

 

I'll admit that I can get a bit overenthusiastic with this score. This is my favourite Robin Hood score, if you prefer me to put it that way.

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Do you know which order the released and unreleased tracks go in if you'd want to put them all into a complete(-ish) edition?

In blue are OST tracks, in red are unreleased tracks:

  1. Encounter In The Forest
  2. Robin Hood Theme
  3. Run, Master! Run!
  4. Journey Home
  5. Battling With The Farmer
  6. Locksley
  7. Earl Of Huntington
  8. Marian's Theme
  9. Your Eyes
  10. Two Mothers
  11. Rescue
  12. The Sheriff's Ride
  13. A Legend Is Born
  14. The Sheriff Gets His Man
  15. Little Little John
  16. Scaling The Walls
  17. Outlaws
  18. Escape From The Castle
  19. From The Rich To The Poor
  20. Chasing The Nightwatchman
  21. Flush Him Out
  22. Proving His Innocence
  23. Setting The Trap
  24. A Noble Deed
  25. Gisborne's Trap
  26. Shooting Pies
  27. Chase In The Forest
  28. Robin And Marian
  29. Marian's Punishment
  30. Where Is She?
  31. Him I Liked
  32. Different Directions
  33. Silver Arrow
  34. Gisborne Woos Marian
  35. The Sheriff's Trap
  36. Robin Rowan
  37. The Tax Collector
  38. Marian's Helpful Hand
  39. Battle In The Courtyard
  40. Dirty Money
  41. Lucky George
  42. Trickster
  43. Robin And His Maid
  44. The Nightwatchman
  45. A Simple Cart
  46. He Is My Brother
  47. He Is My Brother II
  48. Plan/Knocking Down The Guards/The Sheriff's Fanfare
  49. The Hanging
  50. The Lost Necklace
  51. No Way Out
  52. A Love That Cannot Be
  53. I Never Told Her I Loved Her
  54. Robin Hood End Credits

Looks familliar ;)

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To be honest, most of them are actually motives rather than themes, and for the most part, they appear in only one episode. The reason is that during the first season, the show works with a "character of the day" routine. Each episode introduces a new character (which gave Price the opportunity to write a theme for each and everyone of them) who is related to the main plot of the episode, but at the end of the episode, when the plot is wrapped up, that character generally disappears, never to be seen again (so, unfortunately, it prevented Price from developing those themes/motives outside of that particular episode).

There are only seven major musical ideas (which appear in multiple episodes), really: Robin's theme, Marian's theme, Gisborne's theme, the Sheriff's theme, the Outlaws' motif, Locksley's theme and Nottingham's motif.

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Finally finished my analysis of Season One Complete score. I originally wanted to post it in the main post, but it ended up being a lot longer than expected, so I just posted a short presentation of that score and the themes introduced in each episodes in the Season One Complete Score section, as well as links to all the music from Season One available on Andy Price website.

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Updated the main post with my analysis of Season Two complete score. Like for Season One, I just posted a short presentation of that score and the themes introduced in each episodes in the Season Two Complete Score section, as well as links to all the music from Season Two available on Andy Price website.

If you're too lazy to search the link, here it is: http://www.mediafire.com/view/2onz255zkzzqede/The%20Music%20Of%20Robin%20Hood%20-%20Season%20Two.pdf

 

I also recently found out that Dinner With Prince Malik (a cue from Episode 10) was actually tracked music, taken from a score Price wrote for a documentary: David Starkey's Elizabeth. It is available on the third track of the album release, titled Family Portrait. It is available on Andy Price's website here, and also here:

 


I now believe it is quite probable the other cue in that episode, Al Shu'jaan, also comes from another score, because I doubt they would have bothered recording just one source music cue for an episode (yes, they did only record one cue for Episode 12, but it was for an important scene. That's not the case here). I haven't found where it comes from yet, though. And finally, I think it might also be the case with the other source music cues of this season (The Sheriff's Fair and Eleri's Wedding).

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Updated the main post with my analysis of Season Three complete score. Like for the previous seasons, I just posted a short presentation of that score and the themes introduced in each episodes in the Season Three Complete Score section, as well as links to all the music from Season Three available on Andy Price website.

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Well I have to tip my pointy wizard hat to you for your work! I can't wait to delve into all this BB! Excellent work! :)

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Gotta fill the void you left when you decided to take a year off and stopped posting reviews! I mean, your last review was posted in May 2013! WTF, man?

People are waiting for your The Chamber Of Secrets and An Unexpected Journey reviews!

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Gotta fill the void you left when you decided to take a year off and stopped posting reviews! I mean, your last review was posted in May 2013! WTF, man?

People are waiting for your The Chamber Of Secrets and An Unexpected Journey reviews!

Blame my normal working life and a steady job and studies and... the list goes on! I finished my studies so I guess I have a bit more time. Hopefully I have enough time to finish AUJ review before Doug releases his book. Knowing that it is coming makes it a bit daunting to continue though. He'll blow me out of the water!

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Fantastic review! I'm not ashamed to say that it was partly down to this score that I got into film music in the first place - for some reason it really stood out to my 13 year old self who had previously had little interest even in orchestral music in general. I'm incredibly surprised that Andy Price didn't get more work off the back of this; what producer/director could listen to this and not want him for their own project?

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On 24/06/2014 at 2:34 AM, The Psycho Pianist said:

I'm incredibly surprised that Andy Price didn't get more work off the back of this; what producer/director could listen to this and not want him for their own project?

 

Yeah, it is a bit strange he seems to have some difficulties finding new assignments, when other composers who have written lesser scores have no problem finding a job.

I'm guessing it might have to do with the fact that the show wasn't hugely popular. It did OK, I guess, but it certainly was no big hit, so that didn't give Price that much exposure, I suppose. A shame, really.

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I'm incredibly surprised that Andy Price didn't get more work off the back of this; what producer/director could listen to this and not want him for their own project?

Yeah, it is a bit strange he seems to have some difficulties finding new assignments, when other composers who have written lesser scores have no problem finding a job.

I'm guessing it might have to do with the fact that the show wasn't hugely popular. It did OK, I guess, but it certainly was no big hit, so that didn't give Price that much exposure, I suppose. A shame, really.

It is the people you know BB. Price must be terrible at making connections or something...

Oh and there is a bit of a competition out there in the film composer circuit I hear.

I would be glad to hear more from him.

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On 24/06/2014 at 0:12 PM, Incanus said:

Oh and there is a bit of a competition out there in the film composer circuit I hear.

 

Of course, I was referring to TV music rather than film music. I'm not sure if the competition is as ferocious in the TV music industry.

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Oh and there is a bit of a competition out there in the film composer circuit I hear.

Of course, I was referring to TV music rather than film music. I'm not sure if the competition is as ferocious in the TV music industry.

These days I would imagine it is as TV is creating more and mroe high quality shows that rival movies but have the advantage of longer story arcs and character development. The scoring budget might be the major difference though and depends largely on the general amount of money spent on the series and goodwill and interest of the producers. But I think competition for jobs in any field these days is quite heated.

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Maybe there'll come a time when you'll have to kill your competitors to get a job.

And a new glorious age of iron and blood shall rise from the ashes of the old work market!

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Well, I've got good news and I've got bad news.

The good news is that I found a few more cues on Andy Price's website (nothing really noteworthy, unfortunately (except for one cue), but it's still better than nothing!) for a total amount of about 5 minutes of unreleased music. The bad news is that I know for a fact that these are the last cues that were on his website, so the main source of unreleased music has dried up!


To be more precise, I found 4 cues from Season 3, all of them unreleased, but one of them we already had (this amounts to about 4 minutes and 40 seconds of unreleased music, not counting Farewell To Robin, which we already had):
http://movingimagemusic.com/media/audiostore/RH_Grave_situation.mp3 = Friar Tuck (a cue from Episode 1, Total Eclipse).
http://movingimagemusic.com/media/audiostore/RH_Highwire.mp3 = [00:00 - 00:33] from The Road To Hull (a cue from Episode 8, The King Is Dead, Long Live The King).
http://movingimagemusic.com/media/audiostore/RH3_A_good_day_to_die.mp3 = Farewell To Robin (a cue from Episode 13, Something Worth Fighting For - Part II. We already had that one via the Tom-Tom Studios website).
http://movingimagemusic.com/media/audiostore/RH3_His_name_lives_on.mp3 = We Are Robin Hood (a cue from Episode 13, Something Worth Fighting For - Part II).

That last cue is really nice to have, not only because it is pretty good, but also because with that one, we now have all the cues from the epilogue of the series finale!

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Good grief BB, that's incredible! I think I'll have to get into these scores, so I can appreciate your work here.

 

I would be happy to help with the discussion of any mistakes, when I find time to give this the time it deserves.

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