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KK

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KK last won the day on April 16 2016

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About KK

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    Karl Ulrich Nikolaus Traeger
  • Birthday June 13

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    https://soundcloud.com/k-k-8

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    Male
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    Canada

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  1. Brilliant show! Season 1 takes some time to find its voice, but when it does, the whole thing starts soaring. Season 4 has a bit of a lull in the beginning but really picks up. One of the more remarkably consistent comedies/Netflix shows out there.
  2. This. Though I find the actual score less accomplished than the masterful Chaconne that came out of it.
  3. I agree with Marian. Even since I first watched it in school (because it was a trendy thing for science teachers to play), I always found its science and philosophy grossly over-simplified. But aesthetically, it touched on a visual and sonic language that I think was a compelling way to dive into thoughtful scientific query in film. An aesthetic that neither Niccol nor many directors/film since have managed to effectively capitalize on since.
  4. That is the only Marvel show I'm slightly keen on watching. But I expect it to disappoint, as most Marvel does.
  5. Sure, the comparison is flawed. I think pitting any composer against Herrmann is going to be a losing battle. But let's not diminish Shore's own achievements for the sake of it. Ultimately, I think LOTR is one of the "great" scores, as is Vertigo. The comparison kind of stops there for me. But I do listen to the former more. And if we're talking about pastiche, Vertigo is essentially all Wagner anyway
  6. Because Alien 3 sucks. The films you score do a lot to either tank or catapult your score into public consciousness. Goldenthal also has a lot of respect in filmmaker circles, and in the 90s he was the arthouse/alternative voice you wanted to elevate your film (like Greenwood or Britell is today). But his output dwindled to nothing in the 2000s, and Hollywood's short memory requires constant reinforcement.
  7. I think in terms of motivic architecture, I understand the comparison in this thread. But I think they both just saw the orchestra very differently in the way they wrote. What a strange argument. How is LOTR any more a pastiche score than something like Star Wars? And if you look beneath the popular stuff (as with anything), there's so much texturally and harmonically that Shore was doing that was largely unprecedented in big blockbuster films of that scale.
  8. Probably the early/mid 90s, post-Schindler's List. That film and the score's large crossover appeal basically cemented his status as more than just a film composer and an actual important figure of the American cultural lexicon. And then he smartly capitalized on that to push that momentum even further in the concert/touring scene. He was as close to Leonard Bernstein as anyone could get.
  9. That, he certainly has. But outside of a functional sense, I wouldn't call Herrmann a particularly gifted melodist. His strengths lie in building structures around accumulating cells. Shore isn't a strong melodist either. And for all of LOTR's brilliance, Herrmann is without a doubt the stronger composer. No contest. Speaking of Herrmann, the LSO programmed his Psycho suite in a strings orchestra concert last night:
  10. Cruella Fancy costumes and campy performances galore, but alas there's no meat to these bones. It's ultimately undone by a lukewarm screenplay that feels like it was written by a committee. Cue up The Devil Wears Prada instead.
  11. The show becomes much more interesting near the end. It’s first half felt too much like conventional episodic tv for my tastes and shies away from the magical realism of the premise that makes it more compelling as you go forward. And I like the score. I just wish he was able to extrapolate its core ideas in more interesting ways than just verbatim renditions with an alternative solo (ex. piano over voice). Or that there was more thought to the way ideas and phrases are musically quoted throughout the work. And I’d argue that there definitely is some chord mongering in there. The albu
  12. I suspected as much from hearing the underscore in the show. There definitely is not enough material to warrant three whole albums. Most of it sounded like minimal variations of album one material anyway. I’m sure your playlist will do a lot more for Britell’s scores than these entire albums do. Will check it out. Thanks Jerry!
  13. Definitely. It's interesting to see how the tone of the marketing evolved as they got closer to the films' release.
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