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  1. Of the Star Wars sequels, The Last Jedi proved the most faithful to John Williams' intended score, with one major exception: the opening Escape sequence. After Williams recorded the score's first 8 cues, Rian Johnson restructured the entire sequence, forcing deep music edits to match the revised opening. Sadly Williams followed suit on his OST, presenting a heavily truncated suite of these cues in Main Title and Escape. Now, with the aid of sheet music and mockups, I've reconstructed the film's opening sequence, reintegrating deleted footage where available, and restored Williams' complete score to its intended glory. In my opinion, the best continuous stretch of film scoring in the trilogy. Enjoy! Williams' ability to ratchet up musical tension is simply unrivaled, paired with a climactic release to make the hair on your neck stand up. A shame neither the film nor soundtrack presented Williams' complete intended score; this had every potential of being the greatest opening track of any Star Wars soundtrack, period. Alas, the wait continues for expanded releases that showcase the Maestro's complete musical vision. Special shout out to @BrotherSound and another anonymous user for their help!
    29 points
  2. I went to the reshearsal with my childhood friend. I'm 27, he's 26 and 20 of for those years we've been listening to John Williams together. I can't really describe how it felt to see him live. My friend and I couldn't even really talk about it, and I guess it's meaningless to try anyway. Let's just say it was a deeply emotional experience. I feel the need to share this experience with someone who might understand it, but I can't even put it into words (not even in Danish, if I tried, haha). I just feel so lucky to live in a world with and at the same time as John Williams!
    24 points
  3. I still can’t believe this. It’s beyond anything I could have ever dreamed of. John Williams conducting his music in the city where I’m born and where I live, in one of the temples of classical music. Utterly amazing.
    23 points
  4. Skelly

    Eddie Karam on Williams

    Hi! Some of you may know that Eddie Karam was Williams's trusty orchestrator for a long time. Karam gave a talk in 2013 for The Academy of Scoring Arts where he discussed his life in music, his work with various composers (Williams, Mandel, Horner, etc.), and gave some very funny anecdotes. I don't think a thread about this video has been made before, so here are the comments he made regarding Williams. Meeting John Williams: Orchestrating Williams's music: Dividing work between himself and Conrad Pope: "Crystal Skull" story
    22 points
  5. Pablo Sáinz Villegas, the spanish guitarrist who premiered 10 years ago Rounds, has just revealed in an interview for the spanish newspaper El Pais that he received a letter from John Williams inviting him for a collaboration with Yo Yo Man and him for a new album they are recording with the New York Philharmonic. https://elpais.com/cultura/2021-09-24/pablo-sainz-villegas-me-escribo-con-john-williams-por-correo-postal.html
    22 points
  6. What a fantastic photo! He looks like a proud dad
    21 points
  7. Today during the rehearsal they played: Olympic Fanfare and Theme Close Encounters of the third Kind Suite from Far and Away Three Pieces from Harry Potter Jurassic Park Finale The maestro was in great shape, how incredible to see him live for the first time, I still can't believe this has happened!!!!
    19 points
  8. Here is my review for Donnerstag, den 14. Oktober 2021 performance by John Williams and the Berlin Philharmonic. After the welcoming standing ovation, the concert opened with the sounding of the Olympic Fanfare, which introduced the reliably disciplined and strong sound of the Berlin Philharmonic. This was followed by The Close Encounters of the Third Kind, which, in contrast to the Viennese direction that mirrored Charles Gerhardt's legendary recording, here were conducted by Williams with more liberty. Afterwards, Williams took a while to compliment the city, which he said to have driven around over the past few days. He said that, in contrast to Los Angeles and New York with their abundant cars, it was great to see so many pedestrians and cyclists in Berlin. He added that the city has great history in its antique architecture, a thriving present, and in the faces of the many children in the park he saw that it is set for a great future as well. Next came his introduction of the Far and Away suite, which Williams said was a project with a need for Irish music, something that he had always wanted to do at the time. He described the Doonybrook segment, written as a non-seriour brawl that in tone harkened back to the times of pies thrown in people's faces in Hollywood comedies. The execution of this suite by the Berlin Philharmonic was solid, with the ever-energetic concertmaster convincingly taking on a role of a country fiddler. The Donnybrook segment stood out thanks to the great vitality coming from the lower strings. The introduction of the selections from Harry Potter was brief, and their execution conservative (as far as world's greatest orchestras go). Hedwig's Theme is a fitting piece where I should mention that the oboe soloist (a young lady with a flaxen hair – later identified as Sofía Zamora Meseguer) was outstanding throughout the concert among the woodwinds. Overall, for this reviewer the highlight of the segment was Hogwarts' theme in Harry's Wondrous World, a guilty pleasure it always is. The final piece before the break was the concert arrangement of Jurassic Park, In contrast with the original 1993 direction, where one can relax and stirr a tea between the phrases of the maestoso, this rendition followed Williams' recent tendency for much faster tempi. The main theme at today's speed resembled a single lyrical utterance, closer to an aria, credit to the skill of the Berlin Philharmonic which played it with grace. The island fanfare was played by the trumpet section with gusto, I daresay rivalling the legendary original performance of Malcolm McNab and his colleagues. The BSO's trumpet section is young and strong, precise in attack, and very cohesive, which continued to be felt throughout the concert. It is not improbable that all of the trumpeteers who played today grew up with Williams' music and knew its big moments by heart. What an uncommon and wonderful compliment to an old composer this is! ---Intermission--- The second part of the concert resumed with a mighty performance of the Superman Theme. The excellence of the bassline, if it persists until Saturday, should be felt on the recordings, and the BSO certainly can hope to produce one of the go-to recordings of this piece. After Superman, a selection from the Indiana Jones series was introduced in Williams' standard fashion. The difference was the mention of contemporary events - Harrison Ford having recovered from an accident and filming the next installment in London, and Williams planning to begin the writing of the score upon a return to Los Angeles. It also involved what to me was the most comical event of the evening, when the maestro forgot Sean Connery's name and the crowd in the front rows begun trying to yell it to him through muffling masks. The Scherzo for Motorcycle and Orchestra to me was one of the highlights of the evening. The BSO was a flawless machine in this one, fitting for a piece most of all related to Berlin. Marion's Theme was a solid show, although I confess that I missed the spoiling plushness of the strings of the Vienna Philharmonic. Raiders March on the other hand was directed by a noticeably more vigorous hand than the one in Vienna, and the eventual recording, if safe from any misfortune, might well prove superior to the one made by Simon Rattle at the Waldbühne a few years prior. Next came the introduction of the Elegy for Violoncello and Orchestra, which Williams selected because he personally associated the sound of the cello with many different emotions, and the Elegy is well-suited for individual interpretations by the listeners. Indeed, it sounded generally solemn and emotional; clearly could work well as a score to many different films, and was a fine choice as an ambassador for Williams' concert works. Without much ado, the Star Wars pieces were announced, and to my pleasant surprise, in the opening Adventures of Han, the Philharmoniker roared to life as if they had just been reborn, no doubt owing to the shrewd contrast produced by pairing this piece with the Elegy. Overall it was my favourite performance of this piece to date, matching, and possibly exceeding the original one, and joined the Scherzo as another highlight. After it, Yoda's Theme came in with unexpected nobility, courtesy of the Berliner horns, and upon its completion earned an immediate standing applause. Afterwards followed the final piece in the official programme, Throne Room and Finale from Star Wars. The performance was a very fine one, and the eventual recording is likely to be added to the list of ones we so much like to compare and favour. The trumpeteers should be mentioned once again, since a lot in the Star Wars pieces depends on their excellence, and they provided it in spades today. Overall, with energy reserves of the orchestra fully engaged and just about every piece a barn-burner, the second part of the concert was especially strong, not unlike in Vienna. It should also be noted that the percussion was astutely disciplined – certainly less error-prone than that of the VPO. Then came the encores, known to me beforehand since the concertmaster named them loud to the orchestra during the public-open rehearsal on Wednesday. Princess Leia's Theme, after a standard introduction, much like Marion's Theme, was a solid performance, and the principal horn was distinguished by Williams and orchestra colleagues to stand up three times to receive a standing ovation. The second encore was Flying from E.T., begun in a racing tempo from the final bike chase and welcomed by the audience with some happy noise. Then Williams feigned leaving the stage again, and returned with the final piece – The Imperial March. The public reacted with a welcoming ovation, one even longer than what I remember from the initial Viennese concert. With the composer-conductor overjoyed, and the orchestra firing on all cylinders, the piece was over not long after it begun. It was decidedly faster than the one in Vienna, although to my ears the horns lost their discipline and got a bit uneven, and so the Viennese ones remain unmatched. I regret I cannot single out the principal flute for praise as much as I could the oboe, or the flutes in Vienna, but that is the beauty of having these live performances with different orchestras and different strengths - back then they were strings, horns, and flute; today - trumpets, percussion, and the oboe. I am sure the orchestra will continue to make quick gains during the two performances it still has ahead of it, since it most certainly already did between Wednesday and Thursday. I am looking forward to your reviews after the next concerts. P.S. It should be noted that I was seated behind the orchestra and cannot speak about all nuances of balance or judge the string performance. I am sure those at the front might have praise to add in these areas. P.P.S. The audience seemed slightly inhibited by all the circa-epidemic restrictions. Had it been like in January 2020, when all everyone cared about was a ticket, I am sure the crowd would have been more freely jubilant. Yours, Fabulin
    18 points
  9. Do us all a favor and don't fill this thread up with these stale as fuck TLJ opinions. Can't speak for crumbs but I'd doubt he'd want his topic and hardwork sidetracked like this. Take it to that dumpster fire of a star wars thread.
    17 points
  10. My own 2 cents: https://thelegacyofjohnwilliams.com/2021/10/19/john-williams-in-berlin/
    17 points
  11. These were once again outstanding concerts. I attended the Thursday and Saturday performances, both times close to the stage - on Thursday I had a seat in row 3, 2nd place from the left, with a good side view of Williams; on Saturday again row 3, but almost in the middle, only slightly to the left (which was in fact the 2nd row because the middle blocks start in row 2). That was the closest I've ever been to Williams. For some reason, I was under the impression that the hall was known for problematic acoustics, so I got a bit worried when I realised I was sitting to the left of even the rear violins on the first day. Needlessly, because the hall turned out to be stunning, and I could hear everything perfectly (plus extra harp, which was nice). My personal highlights were the Olympic Fanfare (always wanted to hear that live), Far and Away (much more fun than I'd expected, because I realised when the expansion came out that after all these years I don't enjoy the full score/album as much as I used to - but it's a fine suite), possibly the best live Raider's March I've heard (I usually find it a bit too much on the heavy side in concert - not this time), Throne Room (because it's Throne Room and because it wasn't in the previous Williams concerts I'd attended), and the three pieces that I thought suited the orchestra and the hall best: Nimbus 2000, Scherzo for Motorcycle and Orchestra, and The Adventures of Han. Comparing it to Vienna, I'd say both concerts were sufficiently different that I don't feel the need to pick a "better" one. Pieces that relied on precision (like the three standouts I mentioned above) were spot on here, while the more lush and lyrical pieces stood out in Vienna. There simply is no match for the Viennese horns (the Berliners were excellent, but they just don't have the same instruments), but the Berliner trumpets were fantastic. The halls complemented those different strengths as well - the Musikverein with its warm, luxurious sound, and the Philharmonie with its incredibly powerful yet transparent acoustics. In Vienna, I could hear every tiny detail, which is a rare thing when you know the pieces more or less by heart (and also, as I mentioned at the time, something that I've very rarely experienced at the Musikverein). In Berlin, the balance wasn't always perfect to that effect (it may have been better with a little more distance to the orchestra than my seats, where I got the most direct sound of the strings), but the spaciousness was stunning (not just left and right, but also a three dimensionality between the strings up front and the various winds in the back). I've also never heard instrumental doublings so clearly, especially when the horns and celli were doubled. The Viennese Imperial March remains unmatched (both for its tempo and for the incredible horn section), while the Berliner Raider's March easily beats Vienna. Jurassic Park, despite a few inaccuracies, was a marvel in Vienna (and again the horn parts stood out in particular), whereas the Berliner version was excellently phrased in the B section of the main theme, but perhaps even faster than the usual (too) uptempo version. On the other hand, the Berliner precision in the Motorcycle and Han scherzos was marvellous. I'm especially happy I picked those two days because I got an excellent Leia's Theme on the first day and the insane closing ovation on the last day. Williams was in very good shape on the first day (notably fitter even than in Vienna, I would say). From comparing notes after the last concert, it seems that he was much more energetic on Saturday than on Friday, but the difference to Thursday was still apparent. I couldn't help getting a bit worried and distracted whenever he turned to the left to propel the violins and looked like he'd run out of breath any moment. I think he deliberately shortened his last few speeches, and didn't even turn around for the applause between Yoda and the Imperial March to make sure he'd get through the concert before running out of energy. But on the other hand, the actual energy he invests in these concerts is incredible, and at times he seems to work even harder than the orchestra. And it seems obvious to me that he does it because he is aware of what he can get out of these pieces with the orchestra if he doesn't compromise and gives them everything he can. I still find it hard to believe that only three years after I thought I'd just missed my last chance of ever seeing him live, I have now attended five Williams concerts, with perhaps more yet to come. I think he just realised that it takes too much energy. I'm glad I caught one excellent performance on Thursday - I hope it was properly recorded.
    17 points
  12. https://www.filarmonica.it/eventi/concerti-straordinari-concerto-per-milano-19-giugno-2022-ore-20-00 Google Translate of the above text: SEASON 2022 EXTRAORDINARY CONCERTS John Williams DIRECTOR 19.6.22 hours: 8:00 pm MILAN - LA SCALA THEATER The Concert for Milan finally returns to its usual appointment in June after being moved to September in 2020 and 2021 due to the health emergency. The great concert under the stars for the city of Milan and for Italy has never stopped and in 2022 it returns with a legendary interpreter. As one of the best known composers in US history it is not difficult to remember John Williams like John Philip Sousa, Aaron Copland or Leonard Bernstein. The career of success and recognition includes a conspicuous list of awards including five Academy Awards, numerous gold and platinum records. With two Emmy wins, three Golden Globe wins, twenty-five Grammys, Williams is arguably one of the most respected film composers, author of iconic scores that have become famous thanks to titles such as Star Wars, Harry Potter, Indiana Jones, Jurassic Park and many more.
    16 points
  13. https://www.instagram.com/p/CU8NZfsAS-s/ https://www.instagram.com/p/CU8QQxtg38Z/
    16 points
  14. Currently intermission at Symphony Hall. The encore for the first half was Williams and Mutter doing a violin arrangement of his love theme from “The Long Goodbye”, which I believe was new (especially based on his speech beforehand, which said how there had been vocal versions but never one for an instrumentalist until this one for Mutter).
    16 points
  15. Yes, Simone knows JW and was invited in the Green Room after Thursday concert. Guitarist Pablo Villegas was there the same day (I think he posted pics on Instagram). I just want to add a few personal considerations about these fantastic Berlin concerts. For me, this has been really the ultimate consacration of JW's greatness, not just because of the prestige of the venue and the orchestra, but because it truly felt like a joyous celebration of his musical life in the city that has always been at the crossroad of history. I don't think I ever attended a concert where the electricity and the happiness was so palpable. The Saturday performance will be remembered as an historic event for decades to come and I felt so honoured to be part of it together with thousands of other people. Each one of us has a deep personal relationship with John's music that, imho, goes beyond the nature of its commitment. For most of us, it truly makes us feel like kids again and brings us back to that magical moment in our lives when we first experienced it. This is one of the reason why I think it's above most of film music. Of course this can happen with other film composers, but JW is the only one who now belongs to three different generations of listeners and filmgoers. And it's not only Star Wars nerds, thanks goodness, but people with very different backgrounds, histories and personal bond with his music. The feeling I had during the Berlin weekend was that everyone was there only because of the man and his music, and what it means deep down for each one of us. I am sorry I didn't catch with any of the other fans besides the wonderful Miguel and briefly with Thor and Marian. I attended with some other friends, plus I had a couple meetings I had to attend and of course I planned some tourist time with my wife. I hope to have more time in Milan, as for me it won't be a tourist place
    15 points
  16. He just said in concert that he will be starting writing the music for the new Indiana Jones in 1-2 weeks 😁
    15 points
  17. Everybody seems to have forgotten how awesome Vienna was, in terms of the musicians (instrument signing session, asking to play the Imperial March, all those happy strings players, the mighty horns..., Anne-Sophie Mutter joining for Raiders, commissioning of a new Ball processional...), the perfection of CE3K, Dartmoor, Devil's Dance, and the now legendary rendition of the Imperial March at the end. The audience was just about the same as in Berlin, standing up after every other piece, hollering, thumping and so on. It was the proper continental debut that generated nearly 4000 comments in its thread, and had an awesome feel of a second chance after the 2018 health fiasco. I am not saying one concert is better than the other, but looking at this poll, it seems strangely lopsided. It will make more sense to compare albums released once we get the Berlin one.
    14 points
  18. I wanted to start a dedicated thread for this album because I realized we didn't have one! When John Williams premiered the Violin Concerto #2 at Tanglewood on Saturday, July 24th, performed by Anne-Sophie Mutter, as an encore a new updated arrangement was performed Across The Stars (similar to the 2019 arrangement, but tweaked) The Concerto was then performed in Dallas on September 25, conducted by Fabio Luisi. As an encore, Williams conducted Mutter for an arrangement from the existing Across The Stars album ("Nice To Be Around") We then learned that the Concerto would be recorded on September 28th, when Doug Adams tweeted this: "This is being recorded later this week. Best wishes (and good luck) to the timpanist!" https://twitter.com/DougAdamsMusic/status/1442619707035734016 Then on September 30th, Anne-Sophie Mutter dropped the news that in addition to the concerto, some new arrangements would be recorded as well: "We are here to prepare for the live recording of John Williams‘ Violin Concerto No. 2 and a few super secret new film themes – loooooove them. So will you; trust me!" https://www.facebook.com/annesophiemutter/posts/415251816632147 Violin Concerto #2 was then performed at Symphony Hall on Thursday September 30th and Saturday October 2nd; As an encore, each night brought a different brand new Williams/Mutter arrangement premiered! Love Theme From The Long Goodbye (brand new arrangement) on Thursday Marion's Theme (a brand new update to the 2008 arrangement) on Saturday On Sunday October 3rd, there was a free concert in Boston with various conductors, of which it was announced Williams and Mutter would take part: "John WILLIAMS: Three arrangements from film scores, for violin and orchestra" https://www.bso.org/brands/bso/education-community/community/concert-for-our-city-reunited-at-symphony-hall.aspx These three pieces ended up being: Marion's Theme (same as what had been played the night before) Love Theme from The Long Goodbye (same as what had been played on Thursday) Han Solo and the Princess (brand new update to the 2018 arrangement) So that's the 5 pieces that are likely to be on the new album. It's worth noting that additionally, "Devil's Dance" was in the works for the first album but didn't make the final cut. It premiered in Tanglewood in the summer of 2019, then was performed again in Vienna in 2020 and was released on that concert's album. So that is at least 6 potential tracks for this upcoming album: Violin Concerto #2 (2021) Devil's Dance (2020) Across The Stars (2021 update of 2019 arrangement) Marion's theme (2021 update of 2008 arrangement) Love Theme from The Long Goodbye (2021) Han Solo and the Princess (2021 update of 2018 arrangement) Did I miss anything?
    14 points
  19. After the concert, at the hotel: "Are they still clapping?"
    13 points
  20. The orchestra is indeed having its FIRST rehearsal today.
    13 points
  21. 13 points
  22. After a few days in which I first had to realized what really happened, I want to say that the Berlin concerts were an incredible experience to me. I was there on thursday and saturday... Just the moment when John Williams himself entered the stage was overwhelming! The orchestra was fantastic and the interaction between the musicians and the conductor was so enjoyable, you really felt how much fun everyone was having on stage, and that carried over to the audience as well. By the way, the audience was phenomenal! So much euphoria and respect shown to John Williams, you could really see how grateful he was about it. One of the coolest moments was, when he announced he would be composing new Indiana Jones music in a week or two, and the audience flipped out and making him smile about it. The program was great too! One of my highlights was the Olympic Fanfare (which I haven't been able to get out of my head since this weekend) - When the brass section started, I thought "Wow! What a sound!" - but when the basses, timpani, and the rest of the orchestra joined in shortly after with this great, deep chord, I was completely overwhelmed. So John Williams captivated me from the very start! The program was full of highlights from Close Encounters, Harry's Wondrous World, Marion's Theme or Throne Room & Finale, but I actually liked every piece! And as the absolute top of the cake, they even played Theme from Jurassic Park, my absolute favorite soundtrack since my childhood, so that was something very special and meant a lot to me! When he announced it as "...the last 5 minutes of the movie" my first thought was "Oh my god, are they really playing T-Rex Rescue & Finale now? The 14 minute standing ovations at the end of saturday's concert was somehow the perfect ending to an unforgettable weekend, and I'm so grateful to have been there, and happy for all the other fans who had the same experience. Hopefully we will see each other again soon, to the next magical journey...
    12 points
  23. Some people have asked me how this concert was different from the Vienna one. Vienna was my first ever JW concert in person, so it blew me away and left me in such a shock that I couldn’t listen to a note of music for a whole week after. That being said: Better in Vienna: - venue - smaller, tighter stage so the sound was more direct, which was an aspect of the sound I loved there - magic of Vienna (it also started to snow a few hours before the concert) added to its already historical significance - I preferred the program there Better in Berlin: - orchestra - as much as I like Anne-Sophie, I preferred the original arrangements of the pieces - orchestra again; really worth repeating as they played with less mistakes than VPO, and especially the string section was incredibly warm and pleasant sounding Both incredible concerts, as a whole I preferred the Vienna one because of the whole experience, but playing-wise, this one was better.
    12 points
  24. https://rbbmediapmdp-a.akamaihd.net/content/66/ab/66abe780-c79c-480c-9631-d5e356faf0ba/8a8a6d65-3996-4f74-884c-4b84ca087095_4cb3674e-dd07-4003-8a8a-d9bfac8f313a.mp3 There you go!
    12 points
  25. That 14-minute standing ovation at the end. John Williams has left the building, the orchestra is gone, the lights are dimmed, but half of the remaining seats are clapping like crazy. I've never experienced anything like this in my life.
    12 points
  26. I sat in the first row next to his entrance. When he came in he winked at me. Best. Day. Ever.
    12 points
  27. I'm old enough to remember the European classical institutions treating John Williams and film music in general as something too commercial and unworthy of their places. The seismic shift started to happen several years ago and I think the unquestionable success of the Vienna concerts certainly helped a lot of these classical establishment to stand up and take notice. Certainly Williams' age and reputation also helped, but I don't think this can be explained only because Williams is now an old venerable maestro. There is at least now an entire generation of people playing and working in these orchestras who grew up with his music and consider it absolutely valuable and worthy of the great classical repertoire, not just because they're Star Wars nerds, but because they listened to it and recognized it purely for what it is, i.e. great music.
    12 points
  28. Let Johnny have his privacy. We are lucky he is even doing this at his age. Also we are living in a difficult time with covid, and he is 89 years old....
    12 points
  29. Here's the new updated link: https://www.filarmonica.it/eventi/concerti-straordinari-williams-19-giugno-2022-teatro-alla-scala Tickets will start selling on Tuesday, April 19, 2022 at 2PM CEST through the Vivaticket circuit: https://www.vivaticket.com Price is not yet confirmed, but I expect it will be in the usual range of € 110 max. - €20 min. At first, because of some unclear wording on the original press release, it looked like this would be an outdoor concert in Milan's main Duomo square, but today it's been confirmed that the concert will take place in the legendary Teatro alla Scala, one of the temples of opera and classical music in the world. This is another historic moment in John Williams' career. It truly feels incredible to imagine the Maestro walking on the stage of this amazing place full of history and conduct a concert of his own music.
    12 points
  30. Someone may have done it, but I decided to look at the old versions of the cues of the two Snoke scenes from TFA. And they turned out to be quite curious... Let's start with the first scene. We know at least three versions of this cue. The first version (4m30 Snoke) is very different from the others. Here the use of synth voices (note from the score: "space" voice - distant; very still (if it can be slightly sinister)) with the slight addition of a real chorus is noteworthy. Also interesting is pretty dramatic rendition of the Kylo Ren theme at the end of the cue. Btw, the timpani roll at the beginning of the cue should overlap the end of the previous cue (3m29 and 3m29R Leia, C3PO & R2), intended for the deleted scene with Leia and the droids. The second version (4m30R Snoke) is closer to the final cue. A male chorus is used throughout the entire cue. However, the music here is very different - the chorus has four parts (unlike the unison in the film version) and no text. The choral performance of the Kylo Ren theme is also very unexpected. It's perhaps a rare case of such use of the male chorus in the JW's scores. The second scene has only two known versions (there may have been an earlier version, but AFAIK, it hasn't been leaked). The cue 6m54AR Bring Her To Me (old version) begins with a small orchestral introduction (almost kept in the final version), and then the male chorus sounds, like in the 4m30R cue, and so does the Kylo theme.
    11 points
  31. One weird thing I noticed...is that with the performance of "Scherzo for Motorcycle and Orchestra", Williams unknowningly may have been the 1st composer to perform Nazi music in the open in germany since the end of WWII... (Nazi motif from Last Crusade)
    11 points
  32. How many times will I have to conduct this piece...?
    11 points
  33. Spending your income to see John Williams live is worth it. Every time.
    11 points
  34. According to Doug Adams, the concerto will be recorded by the end of the week! Williams is on fire! https://twitter.com/DougAdamsMusic/status/1442619707035734016?s=20
    11 points
  35. Having listened to this again, it seems I'm finally "getting" it. After being bowled over in the film, I was ever so slightly left cold by the score when I first listened to the OST. Having the promo material and extracted bits helped a lot, but today, something finally clicked. A masterpiece. And how very lucky all involved were/are in retrospect, with this - and the Vienna Concert - coming in right before Corona hit. Rather amazing, really.
    11 points
  36. By popular demand, a music-only version. Enjoy!
    10 points
  37. I was hanging with the horn section after the Saturday concert. First horn Chris said that Johnny came to him and said that nothing wrong with his playing but John was too tired to conduct Leia's theme as an encore!!
    10 points
  38. 10 points
  39. Here's the standing ovation from the second concert. John also received flowers:
    10 points
  40. Absolutely brilliant today!! Even though they skipped Luke and Leia, they definitely gave their absolute best. Hopefully tmr will have something special for the last show in Berlin
    10 points
  41. I attended the rehearsal too and John Looks fantastic. He walks as a 89 year old man but when conducting he looks 30 years younger!
    10 points
  42. Greetings from the third row! He looked at me quite a bit! Seeing the maestro live will never get old.
    10 points
  43. Some part of me does want to properly feed you to see how far into complete insanity you can go.
    10 points
  44. 9 points
  45. Berlin, October 16 2021 Berlin, October 15 2021 Berlin, October 15 2021 Berlin, October 14 2021
    9 points
  46. Splitting this out from the Chicago thread, because it's a bit off-topic there. According to Banderas, they're shooting until December. As for how quickly Mangold can turn around films: 3:10 to Yuma - Wrapped Jan 20, 2007, released Aug 21, 2007 (7 month turnaround) The Wolverine - Wrapped Nov 21, 2012, scoring sessions March, released July 26, 2013 (8 month turnaround) Logan - Wrapped Aug 23, 2016, released Feb 17, 2017 (6 month turnaround) No confirmation on Indy 5's editor yet but safe bet it'll be Mike McCusker. This is a great interview where he discusses his workflow with Mangold: In summary, Mike edits the entire film in previz before shooting starts, works during principal photography (staying within a day or two of dailies), and replaces previz shots with actual footage as Mangold shoots it. His first cut is usually ready two weeks after production ends, at which point Mangold starts his director's cut. So based on that timeline, a preview screening for Williams in January seems possible, after which he'll go off and start sketching themes. The actual spotting session would presumably happen later, in February? In 2012 Williams said he was averaging, "as much as a minute done or a minute and a half done in a day." So is January through May (with sessions after Carnegie Hall on April 21) sufficient to complete an Indiana Jones score, at 90 years old? He must be aiming to finish before June, with Chicago and Milan on the agenda.
    9 points
  47. Never ceases to amaze me how people can wax lyrical about Williams scoring action films into his late 80s, yet mock Ford for playing this role in his 70s. We should celebrate these people for dedicating their twilight years to work, when they could easily be enjoying retirement. The likes of Ford and Williams and Attenborough (who continues to narrate documentaries at 95!) should be applauded, not ridiculed.
    9 points
  48. Guys, that applause at the end... I don't go much to concert halls, but I've never seen something like that. I noticed on Thursday that the applause went on for 10 or 20 seconds longer than usual after the musiciens started packing, but tonight it just didn't stop. A good measure of our love and appreciation for that man. I nearly believed he would return ! And he will, next year !
    9 points
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