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  1. My thoughts on the film and score: Spielberg’s usual knack for sentimentality and wide-eyed wonder manifests itself so effortlessly in this tender autobiography about the healing power of art in a broken family. It feels like he’s been making movies for decades with this in the back of his mind, not as some grand end goal per se but as another big piece to fit comfortably into the later chapters of his oeuvre. There has always been a little spot in his filmography left open for this one. Those skeptical about the material will be happy to know that it plays less like the stock coming-of-age-meets-homage-to-cinema vanity project that you’re probably thinking of and more like a warm and fuzzy flicker of home movie memories from the all-time great. The first hour or so is as close as the film gets to saccharine, not so much sweetened as it is a little corny, but never cloying. For anyone allergic to Spielberg in that general mode, this won’t change your attitude. The film fittingly grows up over the runtime, but still skillfully walks the bittersweet line between the dramatic weight and the tongue-in-cheek dorkiness of Spielberg’s youth from the get-go. It’s never self-serious and has a good sense of humour about itself without compromising the emotional resonance of the familial tensions. If anything, the lightness authenticates it. I’m not sure if it was just emphasized by the receptive festival crowd, but this might actually be one of Spielberg’s funniest, filled with lots of naturalistic sibling banter, interjections from old Jewish relatives, and the usual awkward teen moments. The monkey is good too! After the wide-shot flourish of West Side Story, which naturally saw him throw his whole cinematic toolbox up onto the screen, Spielberg’s direction scales back and excels in the light touch of his patented formal economy. He’s still bringing the goods as necessary, from a couple of lasting compositions to one incredibly memorable visual gag, but don’t go in expecting any show-stopping long-takes. Ultimately the heart of the film is the script, co-authored by Tony Kushner but so clearly a personal outlet for Spielberg. Sure, the recreated anecdotes will be familiar to admirers of his work, but there’s a whole groundwork of thematic subtext there to deepen the scenes that would otherwise have us pointing at the screen DiCaprio-style. In fact, it's pretty remarkable how well so much of the stuff I "recognized" translates to the screen without that embarrassing feeling that it’s only there for the sake of it. The performances are really solid in an ensemble sort of way. Obviously Paul Dano and Michelle Williams as the parents goes without saying, but the main guy who plays Spielberg at high school age is actually really good too. I recall some of the early reactions mentioning Licorice Pizza as a reference, which makes some sense considering how certain characters will just wander in, own the movie for a few minutes, and then leave (Judd Hirsch and David Lynch, baby!). Fortunately, that’s as far as the comparison goes though. I didn’t like the rose-coloured glasses the PTA film insisted on wearing but no matter here. Just as my film brain is always focusing on the camera movement and editing, my film score ears are tuned in to catch and place as much music as possible. Williams’ score is sparse but thoughtfully spotted and quite elegant in a sombre way, as KK has already mentioned. My estimate is probably not much more than a half-hour of original music, if even that much. It’s possible Williams wrote and recorded some other suites or arrangements intended for the album, but otherwise I imagine the OST will be a combination of licensed music and original score. There are a couple period needledrops from the radio, a number of classical piano pieces played by his mother (credits listed Satie’s Gymnopedie, and others by Beethoven, Haydn, and maybe Bach), as well as some diegetic Western music heard on records during the movie screenings (I recognized the villain theme from Bernstein’s The Magnificent Seven and the title melody from Newman’s How The West Was Won, credits also listed something by Victor Young, Max Steiner’s The Searchers, and more Alfred Newman- Captain From Castile may have been it). As far as Williams’ score goes, there’s one main idea for celeste, strings, harp, and what I think was an oboe or clarinet. It appears about three times in the film proper, and is also the basis for the 4 to 5-minute end credits suite, which is a unique recording and the longest piece of music altogether. That one is sure to get a lot of plays. All the players are listed, including a standard string section, french horns, and soloists on piano, celeste, and guitar. Whoever drew the Book Thief comparison was about as close as they could have gotten, even though this is still pretty unique territory from a functional standpoint. Being reminded of Williams' grace and deftness after the sequel trilogy years of wall-to-wall tentpole scoring is of course another testament to his genius. Certainly worth a closer listen. Anyway, it was really cool to attend a TIFF screening for the first time and to have it be the new Spielberg/Williams collaboration of all things. I’ll definitely be seeing this again in November. My favourite part was the post-credits stinger where a silhouetted man clearly wearing a turtleneck appears in a doorway and we get a booming, "Hey Stevie, baby!" accompanied by a bass pizzicato Jaws theme before it cuts to black. Seriously though, count me as a Fabel-fan.
    23 points
  2. In a couple of months, I'll be celebrating my '30th anniversary' of being a John Williams fan and collector. Growing up with films like Star Wars, Indiana Jones and E.T., I've been intrigued by Williams' music since childhood, but it was during the Spring of 1993 that I became a true and devoted fan. My life was very different 30 years ago. I was still living with my parents, attended the final year of high school, had hair on my head and I had no idea how my life was going to turn out. I look back on 30 years filled with significant events, ranging from wonderful to not so great. I became a teacher and headmaster, got married to a beautiful wife, bought a house, lost my stepfather and grandparents, traveled the world, became father to an autistic son and successfully overcame an episode of depression. The music of John Williams has been an integral part of my personal journey and has always had a positive effect on me. Today I had some photos taken of my entire collection, something I've been wanting to do for years. I hope you will enjoy them and here's to the next 30 years!
    22 points
  3. Beautiful theme! Just so we can get a sense of what the actual melody of the theme is, I did a transcription of the theme proper (minus the intro, middle section, and coda) . There are two statements - the first in the strings at 0:29, the second in the horn at 2:33 (I reposted the great-sounding video from @crumbs):
    20 points
  4. Apparently, one of the final awards approved by the Queen https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11244771/Queens-final-knight-John-Williams-honoured-creating-music-blockbuster-films.html
    18 points
  5. JoAnn Kane Music Service just posted what’s likely a small peak at the score:
    17 points
  6. 1998 at the Hollywood Bowl JW: "Now I'd like to play a little something from next year's new Star Wars movie. It is a piece called Qui-Gon's Noble End for when Liam Neeson's character is killed by Darth Maul. Enjoy" 😂
    16 points
  7. And I was there! What a thrill. And Johnny said he would like to come back at 100.
    16 points
  8. I think there is not a singular final statement. Williams probably receives more acclaim now, than at any other point in his career. The concerts in Vienna, Berlin and Milan, his collaboration with Anne-Sophie Mutter and the fact that he's still scoring films at 90 (!) years of age, including an Indiana Jones film, are such wonderful moments to witness. I think Williams 'final statement' is that during the last phase of his career, he was regarded as 'a great composer', not just a 'film music composer' and his music and presence was heralded in the epicentres of classical music.
    14 points
  9. ...you cringe when people call tracks on scores, "songs"
    14 points
  10. mini JWFan meetup Saturday morning. Right to left is Mike Matessino, myself, Jim Ware, and his wife Aparna
    14 points
  11. Wow, @Ludwig, we are possessed by the same need to transcribe, aren't we! Here's my own attempt, just of the opening first minute and a half. We can compare notes, literally!
    14 points
  12. Obviously this is just wonderful to see and hear, not just as an early treat but also as a reminder of the blessing that Williams is alive and well to write, record and perform this piece and an entire new score at the age of 90. I thought the Obi-Wan theme was alright and understand why it was structured the way it was, but this right here is a return to a type of full-bodied and well-developed standalone piece like only the maestro can deliver. Every progression where it should be, covering so much ground in just a 4-minute arrangement. The warm harmonies are very reminiscent of TROS and conform beautifully to the kind of classy and mature style of Williams' later years. Seeing Mangold's active involvement in the process is the cherry on top, and hopefully bodes well for the treatment of the score proper and I suppose just the film itself too. "Why don't you play it at the Bowl?" is such a great line for the anecdotal Williams pantheon. Amazing.
    14 points
  13. Why choose between fashion and protection when you can just wear a chainmail turtleneck!
    13 points
  14. mocc.mp3 It's probably more than a bit incorrect since I have trouble reading the spots that are probably trying to communicate to me the sharp and flat symbols, and I am too tired to play a harmony guessing game atm. One bar of bassline is obscured, so I left it empty.
    13 points
  15. 13 points
  16. Dear friends and fellow Star Wars fans... Please know the following A: I am a huge Star Wars fan B: I am a huge Star Wars Music fan ;} C: I think J Williams is a godlike super human ;} D: I am so happy to hear that some of my fans are as upset as me that this Disney/Lucas deal has apparently ended my career! ??? I was rcruited by Lucas to be the only in-house composer within the entire Lucas empire.... I worked my ass off and tried to deliver the best music I possbly could for these people over a period of about 20 years now, but It's been super hard to deal with all the politics and quite frankley, shortsightness of the "powers that be" over in Lucasland. All sorts of weird stuff has happened since DIsney "aquired" Star Wars and the only conclusion I can make is that some lawyers pocketed Millions whilst I recieved an insulting royalty chack for about 3 dollars 50 cents USD.... IM NOT JOKING!!!! wow. So since then, any attempt I make to even TALK to Disney or Lucas regarding the possibilities of me continued to work on these franchises has been ignored... I was even reccomended by former LucasArts composer Wilbert Rojet, to compose music for a VR project with ILM (Lucas's renowned special effects studio), but these people didn;t even have the coutesy to return my email... they simply hired someone else (Who didn;t move their entire family to Marin county to work... or anything like that_) I hate to say it, but the Darkside is alive and well in Lucasland! I don't think it's Disney that retried me... I beleive its Lucas, and I beleive the only reason is politics and lawyers (worried that my "loose" arrangment with Lucas in the past might now be a "liability" on their part. Starangly! Disney records is now suddenly into relasing some of my material to be available on Spotify etc... for the very forst time... What is funny though, is that when I talk to them, they seem to treat me like "Some Old Guy" who "used to" compose music for them...!!!! Wow. I'm not even 60 and J Williams is 90!!!! What????\ The bottom line is this: To "my" fans and any fan of Star Wars and Star Wars Music. I'm so sorry to disappoint you, but G Lucas is in the business of becoming enormously wealthy. He has many lawyers "buffering" him from people like you and me (Fans and "Assets Creators") I don't blame George, but it's likely he has never even heard my name... I also don't blame Disney ... It's Disney who reached out to me to FINALLY release my very first Star Wars game... Lucas always REFUSED. To clarify, I mean Lucas' Lawyers always refused. The Disney Lawyers, at least see the value os rerleasing my work (even if they assume I'm a "Washed up Old Guy" The weirdest part of all of this, is that my music composing skills (and orchestration/recording/mixing and producing skills are better than ever!!! ... once I understand how musch of my music Disney beleives they own, I can ask them politely again if I might possibly have my job back and be "Allowed" to continue to compose for this wonderful franchise called "Star Wars" until then... I just write music for myself that no-one will ever hear but me and few close friends... IT"S FRICKEN awesome BTW!!!! ;} Again thanks so much and I apologize, because I really have just about zero control over my own career M G
    13 points
  17. …you know who scored a movie, but not who directed it.
    12 points
  18. He introduced the Harry Potter pieces as usual, saying he'll do Hedwig's Theme and Harry's Wonderous World. But after Hedwig's theme he turned around and started talking about Fiddler on the Roof. The orchestra just went with it, and also proceeded with the surprise Schindler's List performance since that's how first violinist Bing Wang's featured set goes. When she made her way back to her seat she went up to John and whispered in his here. He humorously acknowledged to the audience that Bing just reminded him he forgot HWW. "Should we call this a senior moment?...How wonderfully embarassing.... You'd think I have something against Harry Potter... or J.K Rowling" So they finally played the piece and afterwards he said "well that might be the best it's sounded, maybe I should forget more often". I felt slightly embarrassed for him as soon as he started talking about Fiddler on the Roof and assumed they'll all just pretend nothing was missing. But he was a good sport about his "senior moment" and had a good laugh about it. I then noticed on the third night he gestured to Bing (probably a wink or something) when mentioning they'll play HWW.
    12 points
  19. 11 points
  20. https://twitter.com/DisneyMusicEmp/status/1562860298910208001
    11 points
  21. My wife is going to buy this for me when it comes out. We'll listen to it nonstop for a few days, laugh at how the Prologue still plays at the wrong speed and she'll say, "The members of that old JWFan forum would have loved this release." I'll turn toward her my voice filled with sadness and reply "I know, but they're all dead."
    11 points
  22. Can’t help you there, but looks like there’s at least one album arrangement. One of these appears to be entitled “Mom’s Dance”, with no slate, like a film cue would usually have: Also, I can make out a “v2 Alt End” and a “v3” in the slates of the other titles, so even if it’s a short score, there were definitely some alternates composed.
    11 points
  23. It is not an official album press release, but a friend of mine that is going to the RUDY LTP concert in Indianapolis tomorrow got this email today from the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra. This is the link to that CD from Varese's website, but it is not ready yet. https://varesesarabande.com/products/jerry-goldsmith-rudy-the-deluxe-edition-cd?utm_source=wordfly&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=9-16-22_FS1_PCE_FRI&utm_content=version_A&uid=639352&sourceNumber=32251 Stay tuned! Edit: Here is the album cover that appears in the said orchestra's Facebook page. Description of album content from that Facebook post: "This Deluxe Edition expands the sequence to 67 minutes and features new liner notes by Tim Greiving, who interviewed the real-life Rudy Ruettiger, writer Angelo Pizzo, director David Anspaugh and actor Sean Astin, as well as Get Out composer Michael Abels, who worked at the sessions. Archival comments by Goldsmith and contractor JoAnn Kane are also included."
    11 points
  24. I was inspired after seeing the maesto at the bowl
    11 points
  25. I think they also accept Mastercard.
    11 points
  26. When you type 'film' on your phone, the next suggested word is 'version' Acronyms for movies are also suggested 'Matessino' is suggested after 'Mike'
    11 points
  27. Time from OST album to first expansion for Williams scores 46 years The Eiger Sanction, 1975 -> 2021 45 years Earthquake, 1974 -> 2019 42 years How To Steal A Million, 1966 -> 2008 Tom Sawyer, 1973 -> 2015 40 years Not With My Wife You Don't!, 1966 -> 2006 39 years Dracula, 1979 -> 2018 38 years Penelope, 1966 -> 2004 37 years Fitzwilly, 1967 -> 2004 Goodbye, Mr. Chips, 1969 -> 2006 Jaws 2, 1978 -> 2015 Monsignor, 1982 -> 2019 36 years The River, 1984 -> 2020 SpaceCamp, 1986 -> 2022 32 years 1941, 1979 -> 2011 Always, 1989 -> 2021 Presumed Innocent, 1990 -> 2022 30 years Fiddler On The Roof, 1971 -> 2001 28 years Far And Away, 1992 -> 2020 27 years The Towering Inferno, 1974 -> 2001 Empire Of The Sun, 1987 -> 2014 Stanley & Iris, 1990 -> 2017 26 years The Reivers, 1969 -> 1995 25 years Jaws, 1975 -> 2000 Schindler's List, 1993 -> 2018 24 years Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, 1984 -> 2008 23 years The Missouri Breaks, 1976 -> 1999 22 years Superman: The Movie, 1978 -> 2000 21 years Close Encounters of the Third Kind, 1977 -> 1998 Hook, 1991 -> 2012 20 years Home Alone, 1990 -> 2010 Jurassic Park, 1993 -> 2013 Saving Private Ryan, 1998 -> 2018 19 years Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, 1989 -> 2008 The Lost World, 1997 -> 2016 17 years Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, 2001 -> 2018 Minority Report, 2002 -> 2019 16 years Star Wars, 1977 -> 1993 Rosewood, 1997 -> 2013 Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, 2002 -> 2018 15 years War of the Worlds, 2005 -> 2020 14 years Raiders of the Lost Ark, 1981 -> 1995 ET, 1982 -> 1996 A.I. Artificial Intelligence, 2001 -> 2015 Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, 2004 -> 2018 13 years The Empire Strikes Back, 1980 -> 1993 12 years The Fury, 1978 -> 1990 10 years Return of the Jedi, 1983 -> 1993 Home Alone 2, 1992 -> 2002 1 year The Phantom Menace, 1999 -> 2000 Williams scores with no expansion yet Diamond Head, 1963 (59) Valley of the Dolls, 1967 (55) Heidi, 1968 (54) Jane Eyre, 1970 (52) Cinderella Liberty, 1973 (49) The Witches Of Eastwick, 1987 (35) The Accidental Tourist, 1988 (34) Born On The Fourth Of July, 1989 (33) JFK, 1991 (31) Nixon, 1995 (27) Sabrina, 1995 (27) Sleepers, 1996 (26) Seven Years In Tibet, 1997 (25) Amistad, 1997 (25) Stepmom, 1998 (24) Angela's Ashes, 1999 (23) The Patriot, 2000 (22) Attack of the Clones, 2002 (20) Catch Me If You Can, 2002 (20) The Terminal, 2004 (18) Revenge of the Sith, 2005 (17) Munich, 2005 (17) Memoirs Of A Geisha, 2005 (17) Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, 2008 (14) The Adventures of Tintin, 2011 (11) War Horse, 2011 (11) Lincoln, 2012 (10) The Book Thief, 2013 (9) The Force Awakens, 2015 (7) The BFG, 2016 (6) The Last Jedi, 2017 (5) The Post, 2017 (5) The Rise of Skywalker, 2019 (2) Williams scores with no release of any kind yet You Are Welcome, 1954 (68) Daddy-O, 1959 (63) I Passed for White, 1960 (62) Because They’re Young, 1960 (62) The Secret Ways, 1961 (61) Stark Fear, 1962 (60) Gidget Goes To Rome, 1963 (59) The Killers, 1964 (58) The Katherine Reed Story, 1965 (57) The Rare Breed, 1966 (56) The Plainsman, 1966 (56) Daddy’s Gone A-Hunting, 1969 (53) Story of a Woman, 1970 (52) The Screaming Woman, 1972 (50) The Sugarland Express, 1974 (48) The Unfinished Journey, 1999 (23) A Timeless Call, 2008 (14) Dear Basketball, 2017 (5)
    11 points
  28. Pretty cool for a big director to talk about LLL
    11 points
  29. A 4K video of the performance with Williams' complete speech. He speaks glowingly about the film and Harrison: Sounds like the film hangs off the chemistry of HF/PWB, possibly reminiscent of the HF/SC dynamic in TLC. That's something the Indy films always did well, his interactions with everyone along for the ride (Marion/Sallah, Willie/Shorty). Might be part of the reason Skull falls flat. LeBeouf does an admirable job with Mutt but the dynamic with Indy is a little dull. Clearly they were going for the Indy unknowingly being a father figure to his estranged son dynamic but Koepp's writing doesn't make it sing.
    11 points
  30. Woke up on a Saturday and had new John Williams music to a new Indiana Jones film waiting for me. Can't think of many better ways to start a three-day weekend. Life is good. @Ludwig @Falstaft It's insane that a piece like this can drop and not even half a day can go by before we already have transcriptions hot off the press. Thank you for all you two continue to give to this community, this just being one of many examples. We are grateful.
    11 points
  31. If Williams wrote some funeral music for me, I would be dying to hear it.
    10 points
  32. Good thing they're not given out by Sony, or it would have a photo of the guitarist on it.
    10 points
  33. I don't know about the French guy, but Pedroni's transcriptions and arrangements were absolutely submitted to JW's team before the recording he did for Varèse and got their greenlight. As far as I know, JW and his team are more than happy with musicians (especially talented ones like Pedroni and @jimnova ) doing their own reductions and playing them in recitals, but the only thing they ask is to not publish and sell these arrangements. It's not news or a change of policy at all, it's always been this way. The issue here is people collecting money out of copyrighted material they do not own. Entities like MusicNotes.com, which allow virtually anyone to submit their reductions of copyrighted material and sell them through their website, are doing it against the current laws of virtually every country in the Western world. It doesn't matter one iota if they are good reductions. This might be disappointing for people wanting to pay for more elaborated transcriptions than what is officially available, but that's how things are. There is simply too much stuff circulating around and it would be impossible to submit everything to JW and have him looking at it to give green or red light for a commercial release, therefore the choice is to have out only stuff that is already being sanctioned. So, yes, the title of this thread is plain wrong and the moderators should edit it.
    10 points
  34. A video of James Mangold's comments. "The astounding John Williams" gets a larger applause than George Lucas The elation on his face at ~2:10 when he mentions working with JW is so heartwarming. Around 2:25 he says they had more scoring sessions yesterday, so the score must be nearing completion.
    10 points
  35. We played at Ozawa Hall. Maestro Williams was there. It was a great moment. He stood and accepted the warm applause from everyone there.
    10 points
  36. He’s the last of a dying breed of composers who came to film without too much preconceived notions and with a tremendous knowledge of the classical literature, therefore able to shape pieces like this. Sure, his music is tied to popular franchises that the general audience apparently is still craving for, but it’s nonetheless surprising that he has the clout of presenting a sophisticated piece like this in concert (which doesn’t sound *at all* like current film music) and yet having the complete attention of a 17,000-seat audience. It’s not something you can pull off so easily, let alone at 90 years old and in spite of being now always treated as the old venerable Maestro.
    10 points
  37. WHAT!!?!? Wow!!! It's absolutely gorgeous, a classic Hollywood theme from the Golden age of film scoring. It sounds like Williams has been quite inspired by whatever he's seen in this film. This also leans into the film noir flavour of Irina's theme from KOCS, though sweeter and less femme fatale.
    10 points
  38. Not yet, but he only needs 7 more Oscar nominations.
    10 points
  39. So much of this comes down to the mix and how involved JW is in the final mix. For composers, attending a mix is quite painful as for each cue you listen to very bad mixes slowly getting tweaked. Generally, the mixer doesn't want any feedback until they're ready to show it to you because it's very much unfinished. For instance, they'll solo the trumpet mic which is guaranteed to sound awful as they tweak frequencies in that mic, then add the trumpet to a tree and tweak some more then move on to horns and to the same, then combine trumpet and horns with decca tree, etc., none of which is close to what it should sound like. This process is done for each instrumental group and when they are done, they'll ask for composer's comments. JW being a veteran already knows all this so I very seriously doubt he attends the mix and probably gets a finished mix to give feedback. In some cases, like Warhorse and Tintin, where both happened very close to each other, it's possible there was more delegation. Additionally, there are multiple mixers, and they don't have the exact same "sound". There is a clear and major sound difference between Eric Tomlinson (vintage LSO scores) and Shawn Murphy (prequel LSO scores). Additionally, technology and aesthetics change over time. 1980's used lots of reverb. Similarly, prequels had lots of reverb (to me, they used even more reverb). 2020's drier, more authentic acoustic recording is the style. Additionally, mixing consoles evolve/devolve. Let me explain. I'm a purist and absolutely adore the vintage 1970's vacuum tube mixing console sound of the NEVE preamps - these were used in Abbey Road. The problem is they're no longer made. Now, it's usually a chip that emulates the NEVE sound - EVEN ON THE NEVE gear! That means if you buy a contemporary NEVE preamp, it will be an emulation and to purists, have a different color than the vintage vacuum tube gear that went out of fashion. I can hear the difference in sound even though it's the same product because the tech is no longer the same. This is true for each and every component. A pro recording engineer I worked with used this analogy which I like. He brings his own vintage gear to record orchestras because the microphone membrane is more sensitive to vibrations than the exact same mic if it's new. The analogy he used was of a baseball glove that is very stiff when new but over time, the leather softens and relaxes and moves much more easily. This is the same with the microphone vibrating membrane that captures sound. So, a 1960's era Neumann mic could be superior to a 2022 modern era version of the very same mic. All these factors play a role in making it sound, well different. I think a really great test is to hear the vintage recording in a remaster and how great it sounds (compare Jaws original OST to the intrada 2CD, same with E.T. and Close Encounters. Note that Jaws, E.T., Close Encounters were recorded at Fox Newmann scoring stage with most of the same players. Horner's Avatar was recorded at the same stage in 2009. Of course, mostly different players and sound engineer plus mixer. I know some of Kingdom of the Crystal Skull was also recorded at UCLA Royce Hall - a concert hall that I happen to like the acoustics of. There are so many variables at play.
    9 points
  40. EH: What do you have coming up next? I know you’ve got some orchestration projects. PK: Yeah, Willow. EH: Yeah. PK: So, Willow is incredible; James [Newton Howard] did a great job. We’re almost done. I think we’ve done seven episodes and we have one more to do. Then Xander Rodzinski took over for the last few. He used to be one of James’ assistants and now is off on his own and is doing an incredible job. It’s such a fun score. It’s just big lovely fantasy music and a lot of nods to Horner. The danger motif definitely comes in a few times, and all his thematic ideas from Willow are in there too. It’s been really surreal sometimes because it’s a score that I grew up on as a child, and to suddenly be hearing the “Madmartigan Theme” over everything, it’s pretty neat. https://filmscoremonthly.com/fsmonline/story.cfm?maID=8380&issueID=214&page=3
    9 points
  41. I'm doing a spreadsheet to compare all the different tracks from the complete albums and the original release, if anyone is interested. The Rings of Power It's obviously still a work in progress, and I will go over both albums again to try to find out if I missed out on something, and when I'm able to watch both episodes, I will definitely go over all of it again, in case I missed something. Any correction or addition is more than welcome!
    9 points
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