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  1. https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=996160772519983&set=a.484587293677336 Universal Pictures Film Music Classics Collection Music composed and conducted by John Williams Limited Edition of 5000 Units RETAIL PRICE: $22.98 STARTS SHIPPING JUNE 24 La-La Land Records and Universal Studios proudly present the twenty-first title within the acclaimed Universal Pictures Film Music Classics Collection – THE SUGARLAND EXPRESS, a world premiere release of music from the original soundtrack for the very first collaboration between director Steven Spielberg and composer John Williams (JAWS, E.T., SCHINDLER’S LIST). Celebrating its 50th anniversary, THE SUGARLAND EXPRESS, released in 1974, stars Goldie Hawn as a Texas mother who breaks her husband (William Atherton) out of a prison farm when she is denied custody of their baby. Together they hijack a highway patrolman (Michael Sacks) and lead a convoy of media, onlookers, and countless police cars across the state. Spielberg’s first feature film balances comedy, drama and action in what Pauline Kael of The New Yorker called “one of the most phenomenal debut films in the history of movies.” Although Williams’ score never received a prior album release, the 50th anniversary of his historic partnership with Spielberg, along with a revisitation of the film for Universal Studios’ new 4K restoration, yielded the proper conditions to at last create an original soundtrack, which now takes a place of honor in the successful Universal Studios Film Music Classics Collection. While Spielberg originally hoped for a larger scale score for his first movie, Williams convinced him that THE SUGARLAND EXPRESS called for something more intimate. The great Belgian harmonica soloist Toots Thielemans became the principal musical voice of the film, supported by an ensemble of top guitarists and percussionists and a small string ensemble. The resulting music reflects the complex characters and the building tension of the story, with a bluesy, country vibe evoking the landscape and cultural backdrop of the tale. The album presentation, produced by the composer, delivers a distinctive musical journey and features material not used in the completed film. Classics Collection producer Mike Matessino mixed, edited and mastered the album from high resolution transfers of pristine 8-track master tapes, archiving the material as well as conforming the music for a new stereo mix of the film. Matessino also contributes in-depth liner notes detailing the history of the production, the creation of the music, and its place in the legendary Spielberg/Williams collaboration. Art direction by Jim Titus appropriately celebrates this historic premiere release. Hell yeah!!! Finally!
    39 points
  2. I never noticed this before, but in the Sorcerer's Stone cue 8m4 The Mirror Scene, the trombones are playing Hedwig's Theme underneath all the rest of the orchestra playing Voldemort's Theme/general harmonization. I never would have noticed this without the score - its something that you don't really pay attention to, since it adds to the harmony perfectly! Such a classic JW moment. I stand by my opinion that the Harry Potter soundtracks are some of his best works. (timestamped moment)
    22 points
  3. Excellent, this is the best way to hear every note John Williams composed for TPM.
    19 points
  4. This is very sweet. It's worth remembering that Williams is a great proponent of musicianship at all ages and levels of experience. I'm sure it pleases him to put out arrangements of his themes that can be performed by talented amateurs and not just the Annie-Sophie Mutters of the world. And while these sorts of pieces are typically handed off to others to arrange, the work is not at all "beneath" him. It's clear that some thought went into this arrangement, simple as it is. At the end of the day, there are Star Wars fans out there, many of them young (and some who might not have tuned in without the hook of Williams' involvement), who will see this video and it will inspire them to pick up a violin and form a deeper connection with this music. And that's entirely to the good.
    18 points
  5. I think this is the appropriate thread... A mockup of a fragment of an early version of End Credits (1-27-17). End Credits music in TLJ has a complex history of versions: at least three can be distinguished, the thematic structure of which you can see in the Lehman's Catalogue (page 87). The earliest version isn't "available" in its entirety: only the first part. In the sequel trilogy, JW always wrote End Credits in parts (in at least two). For example, it is known that in TFA he wrote one part first and handed it to JKMS with a note in the sketch "Ending to come". As for this version, 9 days later (February 5) JW made small fixes regarding instrumentation. Perhaps at that time the 2nd part of End Credits was already finished, but we don't know about it. Moreover, I only did a mockup of the first half of that part. The most intriguing thing here is Rose's alternate B-theme, which JW later abandoned. Also he tried to continue the 'Luke in Exile' theme (at 1:57). (The second "unmockuped" half is based on 1M6 We Can Do This, but contains original snippets as well. Alas, I'm not sure I'll take on this half...)
    15 points
  6. According to Spielberg, Williams repeatedly tells him that he’s waiting for his next assignment. “Every time we see each other,” Spielberg says, “Johnny asks, ‘Are you working on our next film?’ "John, John, you are going to love this. I am finally making a new film." "Oh, that is fantastic, Steven. These concert works are sucking the life out of me. Please give me some inspiration." "Well, the wait is over. I am filming soon." "Great, great. What is it about?" "Well, what if aliens came to visit earth?" "Um, yeah, well, here's the thing: I am writing concert music at the moment."
    14 points
  7. Although Williams’ score never received a prior album release, the 50th anniversary of his historic partnership with Spielberg, along with a revisitation of the film for Universal Studios’ new 4K restoration, yielded the proper conditions to at last create an original soundtrack 2027, Mike! We're counting on you!
    13 points
  8. Samples and direct order: https://lalalandrecords.com/sugarland-express-the-limited-edition/ 1. The Sugarland Express – Main Title 1:29 2. Freedom At Last :46 3. The First Chase 2:32 4. Taking The Jump 1:48 5. The Caravan Forms 2:01 6. To The Roadblock 1:27 7. Sugarland Dance 1:38 8. Road Ballad 2:05 9. Out Of Gas 2:24 10. Trading Stamps 1:14 11. Police Cars Move 1:00 12. Along The Route 1:18 13. Man And Wife 2:09 14. Franklyn Falls :29 15. Sealing The Bargain 1:27 16. The Deputies Arrive :55 17. The Onlookers 1:02 18. Open Highway 2:04 19. Pursuit 1:51 20. Over The Next Hill 1:04 21. Setting The Trap 1:41 22. Last Conversation 2:00 23. The Final Ride 3:36 24. The Sugarland Express – End Title 1:45 Total Album Time: 40:31
    13 points
  9. What Ever Happened to Great Movie Music - Elmer Bernstein, 1970 This reads a bit like a modern version of Bernstein's article. Perhaps less critical and pessimistic, and somewhat more open minded. It's a pretty good article, actually, and while it doesn't offer much news for us who know all about the world of film scoring, it would make a good overview to what film music actually is and what it can do for people who are less familiar with it. I do find this one comment by John Murphy rather superficial (dare I say: ignorant) though: Being "classically" trained - having studied composition and harmony (not to mention counterpoint) - isn't an indoctrination to make composers endlessly copy "old-fashioned" massive orchestral leitmotif scores. There have been highly skilled autodidacts throughout the history of music. Nevertheless, studying music (or any thing) will generally give you more knowledge and craft than not doing it. How you then apply those skill is still up to you. I don't see from which perspective *not* having learned about how music works would be a considered a badge of honour. Not every film needs lots of memorable themes, or even one, or a big orchestra, or even any kind of acoustic ensemble at all - if anything, much fewer films these days do, because sound effects and sound design are much more flexible now, and other technological advancements help films hold up much better for longer stretches without any music at all. Classically trained composers like Williams have written plenty of pop scores (just look at all those early comedies Williams has scored). Knowing how music works doesn't stop you from doing that. But it allows you to do other things that you might not be able to do, with limited time, without having first studied it. The main problems I see with film music today are: Production schedules have changed so much that composers come in very late, with very little time to write a score to a film that is still changing. The more complex or horizontal a score is, the less likely it is to survive (musically, i.e. without being mangled in editing) to the final cut. Films generally need much less music now, which is fine - but without either enough time (and at least some chronological proximity between queues) *and* without easily identifiable themes, writing a score that is musically coherent and not merely either generic wallpaper or a rather incoherent collection of brief, unrelated cues (an "album" in the loosest sense of the term) becomes much more difficult. Today's film composers mostly seem to have learned their craft by listening to the works of the previous generation of film composers - who were at least still partially "classically trained". Which means that more often than not, when they write a "traditional" score, they will be influenced by all the tropes and cliches employed by their predecessors, but without their expertise and musical knowledge. In a way, current day "traditional" scores often reflect the imagined superficial Gebrauchsmusik film score classic Hollywood was constantly accused of by "serious" musicians much more than those scores did.
    12 points
  10. Perhaps the best thing to do is stop with the speculation and take the official announcements for what they state. It is nothing more than a health concern from which he needs to take some time off for and is expected to make a full recovery. Do not speculate about anything worse.
    12 points
  11. You could hear his internal monologue screaming “NOOOOOO!” when they were talking about going to say hi to him at the golf course.
    11 points
  12. As for what the elderly "can/can't" or "should/shouldn't" do, I'll say that, like most things, it should be considered on a case by case basis. Here we tend to shelter the elderly and advise them to slow down, even if they're not ready to, and their bodies are still willing. That only serves to suck away vitality, and accelerates the aging process. In the years I spent in Japan, I observed a different attitude towards aging, and the elderly were quite active and lively... It wasn't unusual to see these stooped, hunchbacked grannies still working in the fields, and with a ready smile. So yeah, if health permits it, let the old folk do whatever keeps them feeling alive and vital. I'll hold up as a shining example William Shatner, who launched into space at 90, and is now looking forward to an arctic trek at 93... Even if, god forbid, he dies from the attempt, he will have died living life to the fullest and on his terms.
    11 points
  13. Tom

    The Empire Strikes Back

    Never has a score had so many memorable aspects, from the obvious big pieces to the little one offs like this and bit pieces like the droid motif, the hyperspace music, Cloud City. Best score of all time.
    11 points
  14. Silvestri's score was far from generic. It's one of the best MCU scores, imo.
    10 points
  15. To have the star of an upcoming star wars tv show who happens to play the violin play star wars music that was arranged for solo violin by the composer of all the star war movies john williams at the john williams building on her grandfather's violin where the sequel star wars scores were recorded and editted by the sound engineer and sound editor of the sequel star wars scores on the star wars youtube channel is pretty good marketing.
    10 points
  16. I just watched Godzilla: Minus One. A great film. Sure, the beginning was a bit slow, but once the story gets going, it is by far the most meaningful of any Godzilla films that I saw. I can't help but compare this movie to Godzilla (2014), America's attempt at making a serious Godzilla film; Minus One just have so much better characters. Everyone feels intimate, real, with a genuine sense of tragedy and redemption. The two leads, Noriko and Kōichi, really played off each other, becoming each other's salvation. Now compare that with Aaron Taylor-Johnson and Olsen's boring, mundane storyline, you can see that Minus One is a serious monster film done right. BTW, Naoki Satō's sore is brilliant in the film. I didn't get it on album, but now that I watched the film, I understand it better and it is one of the most effective scores of last year. I know everything comes down to just having an opinion, but some of the opinions in the film music community raise my eyebrows from time to time. Over the last couple years, I learned that Villeneuve is too pretentious, too artsy, and Dune: Part Two is not epic sci-fi because it isn't neo-romantic like Star Wars. I was told Lynch's Dune had better acting (not even remotely true) and was more "colorful." In another forum, people were drooling over Emmerich directing Dune II, and defending bottom barrel films like 10,000 BC. Then the James Bond crowd thinks the Craig films have too much character, too much personal storylines, and they want the franchise to be more trashy action films. A fanbase that consistently want their beloved franchise to have less dramatic depth. And now, I am hearing that Godzilla: Minus One is too talky, too boring, and the score is bad (literally the opposite is true for me). Instead, they want Michael Dougherty to come back, the guy that made the terrible King of the Monsters. Yes, the film has a great sense of scale, and some incredible shots, but Dougherty can't shoot people or action to save his life. Every time the monsters fight, the camera cuts away to the humans. Only the humans are as interesting as extras in the film. I mean, Minus One has more steady Godzilla footage with a $15 million budget. That is not to say that I don't enjoy GvK and GxK from a pure entertainment value. I do. But honestly, those films are so far away from the essence of filmmaking, they are becoming closer and closer to a CGI cutscene in a PS5 game than a movie. Here is the thing about Bay. He is an incredible cinematographer. The Rock is one of the most beautifully shot action films I ever seen. The use of lighting and effective framing added much needed mystique to a simple plotted action film. Bay's problem, as you said, is that he never grew out of his commercial/music video roots. Yes, if you have 20 seconds to get someone's attention, you constantly need stylish shots, but not when you have a 2 hours to tell a story. Having a camera panning 360 degrees around the actors looks cool, but it completely destroys the structure of the scene. Did he care? Probably not. Emmerich on the other hand is just too casual as a filmmaking. He doesn't care about style, or much of anything. Bay overused explosions during the Pearl Harbor scene, but his execution of an air-to-sea battle is still leagues more realistic and visually interesting than what Emmerich did in Midway. Emmerich has no standout personality or style in his filmmaking. You called that "refreshing." I called it mediocre filmmaking.
    9 points
  17. https://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=157212&forumID=1&archive=0
    9 points
  18. 9 points
  19. "Close Encounters, man, that was a ******* great movie. Jamie, pull up the music. Can we not play it? Will we get a copyright strike? ******* YouTube. Alien is probably my favorite movie. Did you do the music for that one?"
    9 points
  20. Yeah this has to be a pretty big deal. Just hoping recovery is as likely as it sounds
    9 points
  21. In case anyone wants to hear Abels' score out of the show, I quickly ripped the music for the end credits of both episodes, which seem to be made out of several separate sections from the underscore of each episode. So far I caught a couple of recurring themes, I think associated with Osha and her sister respectively! I wonder if we'll get to hear some Williams' reference at some point? In case it happens it'll probably be the Force theme as it's the only logical theme in the timeline. Perhaps Yoda's theme in case he makes a cameo (which I doubt, but who knows)
    9 points
  22. Kathleen Kennedy was actually fired years ago. I know. I saw it on YouTube.
    9 points
  23. This has nothing to do with MEGALOPOLIS as such, but a moment tonight at Cannes that I found very moving -- Coppola, who was there with his film, presenting George Lucas the honorary award. Can't we just stop being cynical for a moment and just appreciate moments like these? These are ageing icons, gone in not too long a time, but can be appreciated now.
    9 points
  24. The 90's were only like 10 years ago. They're playing E.T. at the funeral ceremony. Nice! Stefan Cosman
    9 points
  25. What surprised me was my reaction to the subject that I didn’t think would interest me: Golf. When Maestro spoke of it as a solitary and meditative act for himself to take a brain break and move a little… something about it made me legit choke up. This Godlike being, humanized in a way in which we rarely hear him speak. Not the Composer, not the Legend, but the man. This was authentic John. I conjured in my head an image of him enjoying this simple peaceful pleasure in and it struck me emotionally. That part was good.
    8 points
  26. The two releases I would expect to see this year are The 13th Warrior and The Sixth Sense. Both celebrate their 25th anniversaries and deserve re-releases. Karol
    8 points
  27. I go off-grid for a few days (won't return in full until this evening, actually), and THIS is the news I see when I log in! I never thought I'd see the day. Of course, the news is AMAZING, as it fills an important hole in Williams' discography. But it's also kinda devastating, as I can't afford it (the total will amount to my food budget for a week!), so I'm hoping it will stay in circulation for a while (5000 is promising in that regard...but it IS a Williams premiere) until I hopefully come into possession of some money down the line. Fingers crossed! Some interesting context bits -- THE SUGARLAND EXPRESS was actually the most recent Williams score not to have a soundtrack release (if you disregard short films A TIMELESS CALL and DEAR BASKETBALL). Now the NEW most recent Williams score not to have a soundtrack release is.....yes, you guessed it....STORY OF A WOMAN! I consider CONRACK sorta released, since it's so short and the title sequence that was released on FSM actually constitutes a healthy portion of the score. Also, we haven't been spoiled with archival Williams premieres in the last decade. If I'm not mistaken, this is only the third since 2011. NIGHTWATCH in 2011, the PETE'N'TILLIE portion of STANLEY & IRIS in 2017 and now this. Which makes it all the more precious. As for the score itself, I've always kinda liked it. Yes, the main theme is the star, but the shuffling percussion stuff has a twangy Americana feel that grows on you after a while. Thanks to LaLaLand, Mike and everyone else involved in getting this out there.
    8 points
  28. My assumption is that Mike has been trying to get things off the ground for years, but Disney is just dragging their feet. Mike is like an energetic kid that just wants to go outside and play, and Disney is the out of shape, middle-aged father that just wants to sit on the couch and watch TV for "a few more minutes". I think the only way they'll ever happen is if JW himself makes the request, similar to Powell and Giacchino getting their scores expanded. In other words, what we need is a mother to step in and tell her husband to get off his lazy ass and take their kid to the park.
    8 points
  29. I’d say this warrants “!” Over the “?”. This is one, if not the most important score in Williams filmography. It’s the start of his relationship with Spielberg.
    8 points
  30. I'm so f*cking sick of hearing this Jedi are bad/morally grey rubbish. If this is where the "creatives" running the franchise are taking it, and I believe it is, then my Star Wars is truly dead. LOL. "Reverent fans". "Reverence" means to show a deep respect for something. They don't have deep respect for Star Wars. They want to make Star Wars their own. They think Lucas' vision was simple, fundamentally wrong, and they want to correct it. Deconstruction is not reverence. Quite the opposite actually. And the "fans" who lap this dog food up like it's filet mignon are just as misguided as the writers dishing it out...writers who probably despise those same fans, incidentally.
    8 points
  31. Thor: "So Mr Williams, just a few questions about Alcoa Premiere"
    8 points
  32. 4. Williams liked the melody
    8 points
  33. Anybody else appreciate the irony that Thor of all people started a new thread where he boasts about listening to Williams’ music in complete and chronological order? No offense meant, Thor! I really love the idea!
    8 points
  34. I agree with your view on Williams' limitations in certain areas, Simon, but I disagree that his synth work is bad. Most of the time, it's pretty discrete and organic. A lot better than other primarily orchestral composers (including Goldsmith) who put it more front and center, without thinking too much about the organic quality of it all.
    8 points
  35. Should we tell him, guys?
    8 points
  36. Jesus Christ, fellas. Come on.
    8 points
  37. Naïve Old Fart

    RIP Joeinar

    I'm sorry for your loss, @JNHFan2000. Take comfort in the fact that JWfan is thinking of you.
    8 points
  38. So much analysis of George Lucas’ intentions when I’m sure at least half of his motivations for every decision were “the rule of cool”.
    7 points
  39. And film it like one of those shit lockdown zoom video things during covid
    7 points
  40. Let's each record ourselves singing it, in any key and tempo we like, and then overlay them all, to create a JWFan tribute version.
    7 points
  41. There's a lot of truth to this. Compare fan reactions to the isolated scores for TLJ & DOD versus the TPM UE, which is effectively a lossless isolated score on CD. Marketing it as "every note composed by John Williams" left a sour taste in people's mouths.
    7 points
  42. Two new podcast episodes since the thread was last bumped! https://thelegacyofjohnwilliams.com/2024/05/10/bruce-dukov-podcast/ https://thelegacyofjohnwilliams.com/2024/05/30/phil-ayling-podcast/
    7 points
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