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Tom Guernsey

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Tom Guernsey last won the day on March 27

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  1. I get the feeling this is probably best experienced in the film but I can’t say I’m desperate to see that either…
  2. Has there ever been a score with a bigger drop off in interest from before to after release than this one?! I’ve struggled to get through it a second time I have to say.
  3. I don’t think it’s that. That’s the sequel to The Talented Mr Ridley, right? In all honesty, I think I may have my wires crossed and he never did a Poirot movie!
  4. I will clearly have to give it a bit more air time. It’s just one of those Horner scores that passes me by I think. My comments probably came across more negatively than I meant but as a fan of Bartok and James Horner that’s definitely a similarity I’ll have to root out!
  5. A Far Off Place (James Horner) - Very much one of those Horner scores that sounds a bit like various others of the same period (1993) but isn't quite as distinctive as any of them. It nicely straddles his 80s and 90s styles with busy action, a fine (if, by his standards, somewhat generic) main theme and a few bits of vaguely ethnic percussion and instrumentation.
  6. @thx99 kindly corrected me that it was Bernard Herrmann who disparaged RRB's score for Murder on the Orient Express. However, still an open question if anyone is aware of Ennio writing a score for a Poirot movie? I thought he did but I might be misremembering that! If so, that would be twice in one day, I'll get my soundtrack fan card confiscated at this rate.
  7. You are quite right... I misattributed to EM but thanks for recounting the story. Funnily enough, I just listened to RRB's Orient Express score and a lot of it is actually a lot darker than the grand main theme. I'm sure Herrmann would have written a fine score but sometimes you need a bit more grandiosity. It almost relates back to my thoughts about Patrick Doyle's score for the recent Branagh Poirot movies which are much more skewed as psychological thrillers with less of the old fashioned glamour of the earlier movies. I was perhaps getting confused with comments EM apparently made about how he'd have approached Star Wars totally differently. He and Kathleen Kennedy have something in common in that regard...
  8. In reality, I'm not sure it would be very politick to ask an American composer to write something for a British monarch given that the UK has a range of fine composers. However, agree that a Walton-esque ceremonial would be right in his ballpark, but then I expect he wouldn't actually want to write a pastiche Walton work - fine for the finale of a little space movie (joking) but not where he'd be writing for a similar occasion that Walton's originals were written. I'm glad someone mentioned the James MacMillan piece at the funeral as I thought it was wonderful and really stood out. I've never really got into the Holst/Vaughan Williams/Elgar choral tradition, a lot of it just kinda sounds generically liturgical/hymnal, without being especially memorable. Don't get me wrong, it's lovely stuff, but just a bit, I dunno, samey?! The MacMillan stood out as it had a much more through dramatic arc and was appreciably different to the rest without being anything that would offend every living head of state (approx) at a funeral. The Judith Weir work was nice but a bit underwhelming - I don't appear to have any music by her, as Master of the King's Music, maybe I should check her music out?!
  9. Like the majority, I went for The Adventures of Han which to me is the most memorable and interesting of the three although the arrangement feels a touch disjointed when it randomly changes direction (but not in a satisfying, dramatic way, it just kinda stops and goes off with another idea). Galaxy's Edge has a fun fanfare, but I genuinely can't remember much of the rest of it despite having listened to it (checks iTunes) 8 times. It kinda has the vibe of someone doing a JW pastiche (albeit a very good one). I'm still surprised it doesn't quote or otherwise reference any of the original Star Wars themes so it gives the impression of someone having to write something that sounds a bit like Star Wars but isn't. Which is weird given that it's presumably all owned by the same mega corp. I like the Obi-Wan melody itself and the first instance in the concert arrangement has some gorgeous harmonies but the middle section feels a bit aimless with a number of repeating figures that don't really go anywhere (Galaxy's Edge suffers from this, but not to quite the same extent).
  10. I guess it must be challenging to score lots of vignettes with no overarching story whereby you can reuse melodies so almost by default some sections aren't going to be especially interesting and/or thematically a bit less interesting, but I do think both of his other efforts are worth revisiting, especially Planet Earth. If nothing else, the opening title theme which swells as the sun appears from behind the planet is spine tingling. However, as I said, totally agreed the Blue Planet/Deep Blue are his finest efforts for Attenborough documentaries. I know he did some earlier ones such as the Trials of Life, but I have a feeling they were predominantly synth, but can anyone confirm? I've not seen that series in ages (but I remember it being, as expected, amazing).
  11. Have cross posted this here and to the Ennio Morricone Composer thread... but did Ennio Morricone score an Agatha Christie adaptation or did I imagine it?! I have a recollection of him saying that he thought Richard Rodney Bennett's music for Murder on the Orient Express was far too grand and upbeat (or something along those lines) but I don't know EM scored a Poirot mystery himself.
  12. Have cross posted this to this and Quick Questions thread... but did Ennio Morricone score an Agatha Christie adaptation or did I imagine it?! I have a recollection of him saying that he thought Richard Rodney Bennett's music for Murder on the Orient Express was far too grand and upbeat (or something along those lines) but I don't know EM scored a Poirot mystery himself.
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