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QuartalHarmony

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  1. Looks like we might live near each other, @Amvanquish: I'm in Wiltshire too. A piece of music for ER would indeed have been good, but it's probably the sort of thing that the Master of the Queen's/King's Musick would be expected to do. James MacMillan composed a piece for yesterday's funeral which was rather good. Much as I love JW's work, I'm not sure he's quite as great a choral composer as he is an orchestral composer. There's the whole Thomas and the King palaver, he hasn't written much choral music for films over the years, which suggests his instincts don't often lead him in that direction, and the stuff he has written has sometimes been good (Cadillac of the Skies, You Are the Pan), but often quite simplistic (e.g. Duel of the Fates and Laudamus Te are very repetitive). I wonder if he's better at wordless choral stuff than that with actual words? A JW processional fanfare, on the other hand, could be absolutely crackerjack. However, whether commissioning a US composer to write something for a British coronation would play well with British composers and other vested interests is a different question! Mark
  2. Well, Tomlinson was recording in the days of classic analogue tape, the saturation of which does indeed give an exciting sound - just ask any metal guitarist. SM was recording for JW in the digital era, where distortion sounds vile and is to be avoided at all costs. Different worlds. Mark
  3. I imagine him sitting there, listening and thinking ‘Really? They want two CDs of this? I barely remember writing it. These people are weird.’
  4. Most woodwind instruments drain naturally and don’t need pulling through during a concert because they have a straight bore. Brass instruments have water keys because the turns in their tubes result in water building up and the instrument starts to gurgle if it isn’t drained regularly by the player. Anyway, I asked an oboist friend who said there’s a particular design of oboe which tends to get moisture buildup in the topmost hole in particular when playing in a high octave. It’s unpredictable, blocks the note and the only solution is to pull-through (which otherwise would not be done during a piece because it’s too time-consuming). He said it was unusual for two oboes to have it happen simultaneously, but not impossible. Mark
  5. Just picked mine up from a local record shop - they’d had it delivered weeks ago, but work was preventing me getting to them. Maybe an argument in favour of ordering from bricks & mortar shops? Just listening to the van conc and everything’s lovely so far. At about 6:50, it looks like two oboists are pulling through their instruments which seems a bit odd. It’s quite an involved operation to do during a performance - I could understand one of them having something stuck, but two of them together is surprising. Anyone care to speculate why? Mark
  6. Very nicely done! The intro is such a fun miniature - reminiscent of silent film music, to my ears. if you feel up to transcribing Banning Back Home as well, do post it! Mark
  7. Goodness me, are you serious? You give me no choice but to quote you back to yourself: “I got the second pressing and the foot was still cropped... early buyers really are getting shat on these days.” A tiny part of a cover image was cropped and you described it as being ‘shat on’. And you say I’m the only purveyor of hyperbole here? Yeah. Sure thing, bub. Mark
  8. That’s the pressing plant’s job. Once the run has started, by the time a copy finds its way to the label’s offices, is opened and checked, the run will be almost finished. Judging by previous tantrums, it’s only a matter of time before we have people on here screaming about this mistake as if it’s a gross abuse of their human rights. Mark
  9. Very much the latter, is my understanding. To quote PDQ Bach, ‘Listening so easy, you don’t even know you’re listening.’ Mark
  10. I bought (or, more likely, asked my mum to buy for me) the Feank Barber NPO recording of Star Wars, CE3K and ET on cassette from, I’m guessing, 1982 or 83, so I must be on my 40th anniversary. I notice the vinyl of that release next to your ET vinyil, @Sandor! I didn’t build on this purchase, though, until I bought the Polydor SW and ROTJ on CD in late 1981. ESB was basically unavailable in the UK until the 93 box set. Likewise most of the Indy scores. Mark
  11. Give me a time stamp and I’ll happily have a listen to my 1993 OST and report back.
  12. i must have misinterpreted a passing comment in an earlier thread - I think it was referring to the LLL sleeve notes and, not having that release (yet!), I didn’t know precisely what was being said. Thanks for confirming. Mark
  13. This must have been given a good debate on here, so apologies for the request, but ISTR some questioning of the ‘switch the projector off, just play the music’ ET anecdote. Is there doubt over whether it happened, at least as it’s been described by JW and SS? I can’t find any reference to it on the usual podcasts or on this forum so, if there has been any such debate, can anyone point me in the direction of a summary of it? Thanks, Mark
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