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David Coscina

I love John Williams' music but I'm a little shocked

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It is probably intentional, Williams would know that it was Stravinsky-like. A lot of his work is like other composers, but we are not to judge because we will never know if he was asked by the director to reproduce the music in some way or form?

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As if HOOK's proven musical integrity is harmed by a simple Stawinsky quote.It is filled from left to right with little thefts, homages and plain self-plagiarism. The problem isn't the fact in itself, but that Williams couldn't distillate a convincing musical concept for the film - having endured it, no wonder, i'd say. It's just a musical candystore, where outright citation of whatever classical work just is drowned in sugary gloss.

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Rather than particularly emulating Stravinsky's "The Firebird" (and certainly rather than paraphrasing it), I think what Williams does in "The Arrival of Tinkerbell" is pay hommage to the entire Rimsky-Korsakov "school" (Andrey Rimsky-Korsakov, the dedicatee of "The Firebird", was Stravinsky's teacher, and largely responsible for the "Russian" school of orchestration), as well as ballet music associated with Diaghilev and his Ballets Russes (this would include Ravel, Prokofiev, Markevich, Poulenc, and many others).

It seems to me that Williams treats Tinkerbell as a quasi "prima ballerina" in a pseudo-ballet, informed by the scene's intense coreographics. Harmonically and texturally, the music gazes backwards, just as we the audience, through the eyes of a grown-up Pan, look "back" on the the adventures of a bygone era (visually made poignant by references to the old Disney film, the set-design of Wendy's house, Barrie's play, etc.). As the story unfolds, and Neverland becomes actual geography in real-time, Williams's approach also changes; "Rimsky-Korsakov"-isms (a.k.a. "early Stravinsky"-isms) are replaced with more "vintage Williams" orchestral playfulness, in a typical "Williams fairytale-esque" idiom.

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I love Banning Back Home. Which Grusin work is similar?

Just listen to Grusin's "Mountain Dance":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=856AKiIcrSU

The piece was used in the film Falling in Love, starring Robert De Niro and Meryl Streep. I always found quite ironic that Williams originally titled the piece "Yuppie Sounds".

Shocking! I'm starting to wonder if Williams ever composed a piece of music that isn't based on an existing piece of music. Am I a fan of the world's biggest recyclist? It feels as if my live has been one big lie!

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I love Banning Back Home. Which Grusin work is similar?

Just listen to Grusin's "Mountain Dance":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=856AKiIcrSU

The piece was used in the film Falling in Love, starring Robert De Niro and Meryl Streep. I always found quite ironic that Williams originally titled the piece "Yuppie Sounds".

Shocking! I'm starting to wonder if Williams ever composed a piece of music that isn't based on an existing piece of music. Am I a fan of the world's biggest recyclist? It feels as if my live has been one big lie!

My long-standing love affair with this wicked and brilliant piece of musical genius that is BANNING BACK HOME is now shattered in all eternity.

FOR SHAME, TOWNER!

:)

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I don't see [hear] the connection at all.

From now on are we to say musical passages are "Stravinksky-esque" if they merely have flurries of woodwinds playing at high speeds?

Tosh I say!

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Rather than particularly emulating Stravinsky's "The Firebird" (and certainly rather than paraphrasing it), I think what Williams does in "The Arrival of Tinkerbell" is pay hommage to the entire Rimsky-Korsakov "school" (Andrey Rimsky-Korsakov, the dedicatee of "The Firebird", was Stravinsky's teacher, and largely responsible for the "Russian" school of orchestration), as well as ballet music associated with Diaghilev and his Ballets Russes (this would include Ravel, Prokofiev, Markevich, Poulenc, and many others).

It seems to me that Williams treats Tinkerbell as a quasi "prima ballerina" in a pseudo-ballet, informed by the scene's intense coreographics. Harmonically and texturally, the music gazes backwards, just as we the audience, through the eyes of a grown-up Pan, look "back" on the the adventures of a bygone era (visually made poignant by references to the old Disney film, the set-design of Wendy's house, Barrie's play, etc.). As the story unfolds, and Neverland becomes actual geography in real-time, Williams's approach also changes; "Rimsky-Korsakov"-isms (a.k.a. "early Stravinsky"-isms) are replaced with more "vintage Williams" orchestral playfulness, in a typical "Williams fairytale-esque" idiom.

This was just what I was gonna say. . . . :)

- Uni

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[ _____________ ] wrote what he wrote. Whining about plagiarism, unoriginality, and overall being a hack now isn't going to change anything.

A) John Williams

B) James Horner

C) Hans Zimmer

D) All of the above

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