Jump to content

Hans Zimmer's Sherlock Holmes Press Release


Recommended Posts

So I just watched Will Ferrell’s Holmes & Watson (2018).

 

It carries the same musical tradition of having a theme for Sherlock Holmes in the style of a Slavic folk song, played on a sitar (?).

 

This tradition started with Zimmer’s score for the Sherlock Holmes movie Sherlock starring Robert Downey Jr (2009) and then again for the sequel A Game Of Shadows (2009).

 

This style of how to musically represent Sherlock Holmes then carried on through to the ever popular BBC series Sherlock (2010-2017).


As a massive Sherlock fan, Downey’s Sherlock was a massive let down (let’s face it - as charming as RBJ is - he is no Sherlock) and although the BBC incarnation was a big improvement, in terms in how it interpreted the original character of Sherlock Holmes, there was something about the series that never quite sat right with me.

 

And I think I figured out why. It’s the music.


It didn’t click until I heard it again in Ferrell’s incarnation, but it’s been there, subconsciously, annoying me for more than 10 years. (Yes, apparently I’m a bit slow. 😉)

 

Why - for the love of all that is sacred - is an English, late 19th century gentleman represented by Slavic Folk music?

 

It just doesn’t make sense.

 

But it made an impact on pop culture back in 2009 and now we’ve been stuck with this horrible music representation ever since.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 109
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I would just like to add my two cents here - while it's true that Zimmer often delivers 'popcorn' scores for typical Hollywood action movies (The Rock, Broken Arrow etc), I cannot agree that his score

Interview with Hans on the score at AICN As always, he gives a good interview.

I for one like the music (though I cant eloquently explain why). But I can imagine that after a while people need to come up with something new. (though I also cannot imagine what)   Al

14 hours ago, rough cut said:

Why - for the love of all that is sacred - is an English, late 19th century gentleman represented by Slavic Folk music?

 

I remember reading some Zimmer interviews that touched on this subject at the time, but I can't find them now, and I don't remember where I read it. Of course, there are many other elements to Zimmer's score than just that slavic folk melody. Violin is pretty prolific - Holmes being an amateur violinst himself. And a general "gritty" atmosphere relating to Holmes' whimsical mind. I remember reading something about Zimmer wanting to create a rowdy 'pub music'-like atmosphere in the score.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven’t seen the movie for many years and am unfamiliar with the overall score that Zimmer composed.

 

We joke about it a lot on JWfan but Zimmer is no fool. He knows what he’s doing and I appreciate a lot of his work.

 

But inspite of his best intentions for the Sherlock movie, I think it’s a miss to let Sherlock Holmes be represented by a musical style that doesn’t really represent him very well at all.

 

But I guess it worked so well, that for more than a decade now, it is “the sound” of Sherlock Holmes. So no one can deny that it didn’t make an impact or that it didn’t click with the audience.

 

And I like Arnold’s reinterpretation of it, it’s catchy, mysterious and versatile, and it plays well in different tempos.

 

I am just saying that - as a piece of musical style chosen to represent Sherlock Holmes - it’s not really well suited.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/11/2020 at 7:51 PM, rough cut said:

So I just watched Will Ferrell’s Holmes & Watson (2018).

 

It carries the same musical tradition of having a theme for Sherlock Holmes in the style of a Slavic folk song, played on a sitar (?).

 

This tradition started with Zimmer’s score for the Sherlock Holmes movie Sherlock starring Robert Downey Jr (2009) and then again for the sequel A Game Of Shadows (2009).

 

This style of how to musically represent Sherlock Holmes then carried on through to the ever popular BBC series Sherlock (2010-2017).


As a massive Sherlock fan, Downey’s Sherlock was a massive let down (let’s face it - as charming as RBJ is - he is no Sherlock) and although the BBC incarnation was a big improvement, in terms in how it interpreted the original character of Sherlock Holmes, there was something about the series that never quite sat right with me.

 

And I think I figured out why. It’s the music.


It didn’t click until I heard it again in Ferrell’s incarnation, but it’s been there, subconsciously, annoying me for more than 10 years. (Yes, apparently I’m a bit slow. 😉)

 

Why - for the love of all that is sacred - is an English, late 19th century gentleman represented by Slavic Folk music?

 

It just doesn’t make sense.

 

But it made an impact on pop culture back in 2009 and now we’ve been stuck with this horrible music representation ever since.

 

Zimmer has crazy ideas, and they sometimes don't work. For instance, I don't know what the hell made him think that Superman should be scored with a lot of drummers and percussion. 

 

1 hour ago, fommes said:

Is it established that Arnold based the style of the TV score on Zimmer's score? Doesn't the pilot of Sherlock predate Zimmer's score?

 

Sherlock Holmes the Guy Ritchie movie was released in December 25th 2009. The Sherlock TV series aired its first episode in July 25 2010.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Arnold’s score is too similar in tone to be just coincidence.

 

TV-shows does this a lot, they “copy” whatever is in style at the moment if it’s appropriate.

 

Early 2000s had a lot of shows emulating the mystery theme played on a vibraphone from Deaperate Housewives, and I guess more recently English dramas want to sound like Downton Abbey.

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Edmilson said:

 

Sherlock Holmes the Guy Ritchie movie was released in December 25th 2009. The Sherlock TV series aired its first episode in July 25 2010.

 

Yes, but the music for the unaired Sherlock pilot appears to have been recorded in February 2009.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines.