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Okay, so I'm considering getting THIS.

It's a definitive box set for Zeppelin. I've looked over their individual albums, and I think I have all their best songs already, but I really want this set. It's very expensive though. My dad offered to get me a new radio for my car, since mine is strictly just a radio, no CD player, cassette, nothing. I think I'd rather have this.

However, there is also THIS box set. It's half the price, and only has 2 discs less music. Perhaps Wojo or any other classic rock aficionado could give their 2 cents.

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Well, the extra money is just for cardboard facsimiles of the original LP artwork. It would still be the same music content, it all depends on if you value your discs coming in cardboard sleeves with little paper sleeves like the original records would be found in. Personally, I would soon move them to jewel cases or a CD binder anyways, or rip them to my computer and listen to the CD-Rs to keep the originals from being scratched. Especially for being such a pricey investment either way you cut it. Both sets claim to be remastered and have good sound; the cheaper set is what Jimmy Page did a few years back, and the more expensive set is a Japanese import. It's not even listed at Zep's main site.

The two extra discs of the Definitive set are the album "The Song Remains The Same", which is confirmed at buyzillion.com. This album was a double live concert from MSG in July 1973. I wonder why they include that live concert, but not the BBC Sessions or How the West Was Won.

If all you want is the music, I'd go with the $71 set. Nine studio albums = 10 CDs because PG was a two-disc album. Enough trips to Walmart and you can find each album remastered for $10 or less at Walmart, but do the math and that's $100, not $71. You can pick up TSRTS for another $20 or so at Amazon or FYE. Happy investing!

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On a serious Bob Dylan kick, here are a few things of note (for me, at least):

I stumbled across an album from a singer named Beth Rowley who is (a) a stone-cold fox and (b) a terrific soul singer and © apparently a Dylan fan. Her album Little Dreamer includes a lovely reggae-style cover of "I Shall Be Released" (a great song that has been covered so many times that you'd think there was no way it could ever sound fresh agai, but doggone if she doesn't mnage it). It also has a cover of "Angel Flying Too Close to the Ground," a Dylan b-side that was more famously recorded by Willie Nelson. Her take on this song is also lovely, although it's somewhat marred by the presence of a male singer whose vocal talents are patently inferior to Rowley's, and therefore an unwelcome distraction. But the real gem on this record (amongst the three Dylan covers, at least) is "Almost Persuaded," a song from Dylan's gospel period that, to my knowledge, he never recorded or even performed live. It's a damn good song, and Rowley does justice to it. She's a singer to keep an eye on.

I have also been listening to the soundtrack to I'm Not There, which is quickly becoming one of my favorite albums of the past few years. There are a few misses, but mostly, this thing is chock fulla hits:

"All Along the Watchtower" (Eddie Vedder and The Million Dollar Bashers): Vedder's rough voice is very well-suited to this song. No version (including Dylan's) will ever top the Hendrix version, but this one is another of the good attempts.

"I'm Not There" (Sonic Youth): Languidly intense (weird, I know) version of a true obscurity. I've never been much of a Sonic Youth fan, but this song is terrific.

"Goin' to Acapulco" (Jim James and Calexico): Never one of my favorite Dylan songs, this cover is so good that it imroes my opinion of the original, which this improves upon. Haunting stuff, although I'll admit that a lot of that is due to how well it's used in the movie.

"Tombstone Blues" (Richie Havens): Havens is in fine form on this one.

"Ballad of a Thin Man" (Stephen Malkmus and The Million Dollar Bashers): Another standout scene in the film, and this is one of Dylan's very best songs ... this is an intense, satisfying take on it, but it's nowhere near as good as Dylan's.

"Stuck Inside of Mobile with the Memphis Blues Again" (Cat Power): I don't know Cat Power, but I dig her name. This is a pretty good cover.

"Pressing On" (John Doe): Absolutely the standout song of this entire set, it's an instant classic. Dylan's gospel period is steadily gaining in acclaim, and Doe's cover will only help that. I'd definitely say it's amongst the best songs I've heard recently.

"Fourth Time Around" (Yo La Tengo): Good, gentle version of a lovely Dylan classic.

"Dark Eyes" (Iron & Wine and Calexico): One of the more radically different takes on Dylan to be found on these two discs, it's also one of the better.

"Highway 61 Revisited" (Karen O and The Million Dollar Bashers): One of Dylan's bluesiest, kick-assest rock songs, this is a pretty good version of it.

"One More Cup of Coffee" (Roger McGuinn and Calexico): I'm not a big McGuinn fan to begin with, and his vocals on this cover are completely devoid of the intense passion Dylan sang the song with on Desire; this one is one of the worst covers on the abum.

"The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll" (Mason Jennings): One of my favorite Dylan songs, this take on it is merely okay.

"Billy 1" (Los Lobos): Good, very straightforward cover of a good song frmo Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid, which also spawned "Knockin' on Heaven's Door."

"Simple Twist of Fate" (Jeff Tweedy): Great song, decent cover.

"Man in the Long Black Coat" (Mark Lanegan): Another highlight of the album. Lanegan's version might be even better than Dylan's; it's absolutely haunting.

"Senor (Tales of Yankee Power)" (Willie Nelson and Calexico): Nelson and Calexico do a terrific job with this song; it feels like more of an epic than it ever has.

"As I Went Out One Morning" (Mira Billotte): Very good.

"Can't Leave Her Behind" (Stephen Malkmus and Lee Ranaldo): This is an obscurity known only to people who know Dylan bootlegs. It's a song Dylan apparently just came up with on the spot in a hotel room; it's not a great one, but for a toss-off, it's pretty damn good.

"Ring Them Bells" (Sifjan Stevens): Yuck. The first part of this one is okay, but it turns into crap when Stevens tries to spice it up toward the end. I'd love to hear John Doe do this one.

"Just Like A Woman" (Charlotte Gainsbourg and Calexico): Gainsbourg is a decent singer for this type of song; she gives it a slightly more tragic reading than a lot of other people who've covered it.

"Mama, You've Been On My Mind" (Jack Johnson): It's another of my favorite Dylan songs, and Johnson does okay by it, also throwing in some lines from Dylan's spoken-word tribute to Woody Guthrie.

"I Wanna Be Your Lover" (Yo La Tengo): It's not one of my favorite Dylan songs, but this version is okay.

"You Ain't goin' Nowhere" (Glen Hansard and Markete Irglova): I haven't seen Once, so I don't have the connection to these two that some people seem to have, but this is an awfully bland version of a great song.

"Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window?" (The Hold Steady): Do these guys always sound so much like Kings Of Leon? It's not bad, though.

"Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues" (Ramblin' Jack Elliot): This dude sounds like he's about 107 years old. He also sounds like he understands the song; that type of conviction is always welcome.

"Wicked Messenger" (The Black Keys): A very good take on a classic from John Wesley Harding, one of Dylan's better albums.

"Cold Irons Bound" (Tom Verlaine and The Million Dollar Bashers): Dylan's '97 version is a bluesy triumph, but this version draws more attention to the lyrics than to the music. Which is cool, since the lyrics are typically great.

"The Times They Are A-Changin' " (Mason Jennings): Mediocre version of one of the most-coverde songs in recorded history. At this point, there's no sense in doing this song unless you've got something to add to it, and Jennings really doesn't.

"Maggie's Farm" (Stephen Malkmus and The Million Dollar Bashers): Not bad; fairly rollicking, which is appropriate.

"When the Ship Comes In" (Marcus Carl Franklin): This kid is somebody to keep an eye on. If he's doing this solid a version of such a great song at age 11 (or whatver he was when he recorded it), then we will probably be hearing lots more from him in the future.

"Moonshiner" (Bob Forrest): Not a Dylan song, strictly speaking; it was a traditional long before he recorded it. Either way, this is a terrific version of it.

"I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine" (John Doe): Doe does a great job with this song, too; apparently, I need to hear more of his stuff.

"Knockin' on Heaven's Door" (Antony & The Johnsons): There's no escaping it; I knew this as a Guns N' Roses song waaaaay before I knew any of the other versions, including Dylan's. I still love that version, as well as the original, and Clapton's; this one is pretty weak, mostly because the vocals are kinda poor.

"I'm Not There" (Bob Dylan & The Band): This relic from the "Basement Tapes" recordings sat unreleased (except by bootleggers) for exactly 40 years. When you've got such an astonishingly awesome oeuvre that a song as good as this one can sit in your vaults for four decades, well then mister, you're know you're the real f---ing deal.

Dylan is the greatest songwriter in American history; possibly in the history of the world. And this album is yet another fine peice of evidence.

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I never got the soundtrack for I'm Not There, but I've always considered it whenever I went to Best Buy. The only reason for me to buy it would be for "I'm Not There." In my opinion, that's not worth $16.

I believe that a cover will never be better than the original song, so that pretty much says why I would not buy this.

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I never got the soundtrack for I'm Not There, but I've always considered it whenever I went to Best Buy. The only reason for me to buy it would be for "I'm Not There." In my opinion, that's not worth $16.

I believe that a cover will never be better than the original song, so that pretty much says why I would not buy this.

That's crazy talk. Buy it, ya sap.

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I never got the soundtrack for I'm Not There, but I've always considered it whenever I went to Best Buy. The only reason for me to buy it would be for "I'm Not There." In my opinion, that's not worth $16.

I believe that a cover will never be better than the original song, so that pretty much says why I would not buy this.

That's crazy talk. Buy it, ya sap.

Maybe, eh... If I had a list of things I wanted to buy, it would be at the bottom. Not a priority, which means I will probably never buy it :lol:

And it's not crazy talk! From my experience, no cover song has ever been better than the original, and that includes All Along The Watchtower. Don't get me started on Guns N' Roses, the lead singer's voice sucks and pretty much ruins anything in which he sings. I only like 3 GNR songs.

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Speaking of Guns N' Roses, has anyone other than me heard Chinese Democracy? I kinda like it. It's not as good as some of their classics, but it's not bad at all; I hope Axl -- who voice is awesome, no matter what Koray says -- is back for good.

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While both versions of All Along the Watchtower are great, I prefer Hendrix' version. After that, just about every other live act has covered it, DMB did a half decent cover from time to time, but Dylan's is very good, too. Each artist provides a different spin to the song. I agree that GNR's version of Knockin' on Heaven's Door is lame, but then again, Warren Zevon's cover is remarkable simply for its sadness in how he knew he really was knocking on the door.

It's hard to really knock covers of songs from the 1950s and 60s, because so many artists from back then covered each other. Buddy Holly, Chuck Berry, and others were covered by The Beatles, who in turn were covered by others.

Besides, Koray, keep in mind that Led Zeppelin's first album, their self-titled one, consisted of little more than just their own covers of other artists' blues standards. They got in hot water for that one, but every song on that album is a standout.

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Speaking of Guns N' Roses, has anyone other than me heard Chinese Democracy? I kinda like it. It's not as good as some of their classics, but it's not bad at all; I hope Axl -- who voice is awesome, no matter what Koray says -- is back for good.

I've heard bad things about it. I wouldn't get it either way, not a GNR fan. Axl's voice works in the confines of his own material, but when he tries to cover songs, it sounds stupid.

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I disagree. Their cover of Live and Let Die is awesome, although I do think he should have left Sympathy For The Devil alone.

I don't like his Live And Let Die, and I didn't even know he covered Sympathy For The Devil. That's probably my favorite song right after Like A Rolling Stone, so I don't want to even hear his version.

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I've heard bad things about it. I wouldn't get it either way, not a GNR fan. Axl's voice works in the confines of his own material, but when he tries to cover songs, it sounds stupid.

I like the covers I've heard. And while I'm a big Stones fan, I do think that GNR's Sympathy for the Devil is really good as well - and sufficiently different to stand on its own.

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I've heard bad things about it. I wouldn't get it either way, not a GNR fan. Axl's voice works in the confines of his own material, but when he tries to cover songs, it sounds stupid.

I like the covers I've heard. And while I'm a big Stones fan, I do think that GNR's Sympathy for the Devil is really good as well - and sufficiently different to stand on its own.

I like GN'R's version of "Sympathy for the Devil," but then, I would; I'm a GN'R fan. And I love their takes on "Live and Let Die" and "Knockin' on Heaven's Door." I prefer the originals in both instances, but that's okay; the covers kick ass.

Speaking of covers, I just listened to an entire album of Joan Baez covering Bob Dylan songs (Any Day Now). Her singing style is a little too earnest in a few places, but several of her covers are handily better than Dylan's originals. HANDILY. "Restless Farewell," for example, and also "North Country Blues" and "One Too Many Mornings." Those are great Dylan songs, but they're even greater baez songs. (Less so with her take on "Sad-Eyed Lady of the Lowlands": I doubt a cover will ever improve on that particular masterpiece.)

I also love how some of the songs take on different meanings when she sings them. Listen to Dylan's "It Ain't Me Babe," then listen to Baez's; they are performed in much the same way, yet feel like they have totally different meanings. Then, listen to the version from Walk the Line for another completely different meaning (I can't vouch for the actual Cash/Carter duet, which I've never heard, a mistake I should rememdy).

Great covers of great songs always thrill me. Every good musician should be required to do them once in a while.

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Great covers of great songs always thrill me. Every good musician should be required to do them once in a while.

Agreed. A lot of good artists have covered good material. Imitation is a form of flattery. CCR (Credence Clearwater Revival) recorded a few covers. Their "I Heard It Through the Grapevine" totally knocks the original out of the park. And The Clarks' cover of Springsteen's "The River" is out of this world: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HywBuMilL1E.

Though if all you know is the cover, it's time for some music...um...enlightenment. My sister told me of a time when she was on the school bus, and the radio played the Stones' "Satisfaction." And the one little girl says to the other, "those old guys totally stole Britney Spears' song!" :lol:

---

I bought The Killers' new album last week, and just finished my first listen yesterday. It wasn't bad, some songs were great and some songs were just so-so, but I know it will take a while to grow on me just as Sam's Town did.

And Coldplay's rip of Satriani's song sounds blatant to me. More so than Ghostbusters versus I Want a New Drug.

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Great covers of great songs always thrill me. Every good musician should be required to do them once in a while.

Agreed. A lot of good artists have covered good material. Imitation is a form of flattery. CCR (Credence Clearwater Revival) recorded a few covers. Their "I Heard It Through the Grapevine" totally knocks the original out of the park.

That was a cover?! :lol: That's one of my favorite songs :)

I'll admit Nirvana's cover of The Man Who Sold The World is pretty good, but I ultimately prefer Bowie's original.

Could we all agree that pop covers are terrible? Like the crap you get in the Shrek films?

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No, because Smashmouth's cover of "I'm a Believer" in Shrek was actually half decent, including the little bit of "Wipeout" in the middle.

And as far as "pop" covers go, how far back do you want to extend the genre? When Phil Collins went solo in 1980, he moved from prog rock into pop rock, but it was so long ago as to be considered classic rock. He has covered everyone from The Beatles' "Tomorrow Never Knows" to The Supremes' "You Can't Hurry Love" to Genesis of all groups, with "Behind the Lines." I will concede his cover of "The Times Are A-Changing" is lousy.

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If you told me you were drowning, I would not lend a hand. I've seen your face before, and I don't know if you know who I am. I was there. I saw what you did with my own two eyes. Wipe off that grin, I know where you've been. It's all been a pack of lies.

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No, because Smashmouth's cover of "I'm a Believer" in Shrek was actually half decent, including the little bit of "Wipeout" in the middle.

Wasn't the Wainwright Hallelujah in Shrek? To my knowledge, that was a cover of a cover of a Cohen song I've never heard, but from what I've read, the first cover is what made the song really popular and got covered non-stop afterwards. I love Amanda Palmer's version.

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No, because Smashmouth's cover of "I'm a Believer" in Shrek was actually half decent, including the little bit of "Wipeout" in the middle.

Wasn't the Wainwright Hallelujah in Shrek? To my knowledge, that was a cover of a cover of a Cohen song I've never heard, but from what I've read, the first cover is what made the song really popular and got covered non-stop afterwards. I love Amanda Palmer's version.

Yeah, I think it was Jeff Buckley's version (which is awesome) which got it really noticed.

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It was indeed. It's easily the best version, too. One of the few things I like about the most popular radio station here is that they have a regular spot, where once a week, they play Buckley's version (Saturday nights at 2 AM). And the other regular spot is Johnny Cash's brillaint cover of 'Hurt' (Fridays at 6 PM).

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Buckley's "Hallelujah" is indeed another cover that's easily better than the original (and I'm a big Leonard Cohen fan, so I don't say that free of knowledge).

Cash's "Hurt" is another. It's as terifying a song as I've ever heard, and the brilliant video is even scarier.

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The only rap I ever really liked was Eminem. There were a couple other standouts from the 90's. I think there was one Jay-Z song I liked, and there were a couple Nelly songs as well as 50 Cent. Man, it's weird looking back on my days as a rap enthusiast.

I was always into soundtracks, but actual soundtracks rather than scores. I remember giving my brother my free copy of Unbreakable because I thought it was boring. He still has it on his shelf. My how have times changed.

So I dabbled a little in hard rock and rap. Then in 1999, full blown Williams and Elfman, with a little Howard on the side.

Oh, and I've been listened to some Who as of late.

:P My Generation

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What does it mean for a band to be "overrated?" Does overrated equal overplayed? Does it mean they get more credit, popularity, money, and awards than they really deserve? Does it mean you don't think they're as good as everyone says they are?

The Who was an amazing band. A lot of their early stuff was just ok, but after Tommy, things really picked up. Every song on Who's Next is a gem. Quadrophenia is a work of art.

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No. They suck, as far as I'm concerned.

"Won't Get Fooled Again" is easily one of the most annoying songs I've ever heard that's supposed to be good. I'd like to send that song a Cleveland Steamer for Christmas.

"My Generation" is a bore, although I do enjoy Weird Al Yankovic's polka version.

"Magic Bus" is lame, not magical.

I'm sure they did other songs, but none are coming to mind.

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Overrated is just a word people use to express their own opinions. It's all opinions, opinions, opinions. No facts in music!

All I have from The Who is the Ultimate Collection 2CD set, and I love every song on it.

No. They suck, as far as I'm concerned.

"Won't Get Fooled Again" is easily one of the most annoying songs I've ever heard that's supposed to be good. I'd like to send that song a Cleveland Steamer for Christmas.

"My Generation" is a bore, although I do enjoy Weird Al Yankovic's polka version.

"Magic Bus" is lame, not magical.

I'm sure they did other songs, but none are coming to mind.

:angry:

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What does it mean for a band to be "overrated?" Does overrated equal overplayed? Does it mean they get more credit, popularity, money, and awards than they really deserve? Does it mean you don't think they're as good as everyone says they are?

The Who was an amazing band. A lot of their early stuff was just ok, but after Tommy, things really picked up. Every song on Who's Next is a gem. Quadrophenia is a work of art.

Well, in this particular instance "overrated" means "I don't like them but know that many, many (wrong) people do."

My tongue's in cheek, of course. Like I said, I know little about them except their more famous songs, all of which I loathe -- except the magnificent "Baba O'Riley." I've never seen any reason to get to know them any better, and something tells me that this board won't have the power to change my mind.

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Nothing wrong with being opinionated. There are some very good bands out there that it's just very hard for some people to become fans of. I know people go absolutely nuts about Rush and collect all their albums and go to every show, but aside from a few songs, I don't like them that much. So it is with The Who for BB.

"Magic Bus" and "My Generation" are some of their earlier, more trite songs. I'm really not a big fan of either song, but the latter song was a social statement from the 60s that doesn't really ring true for them anymore, considering one of the band really did die before he got old. The album cover of "Who Are You" presents, sadly, a very ironic image.

Let's see what Who I have in my collection...

Live at the Isle of Wight is a very good double-live CD set that presents a lot of early material and most of Tommy, but since it's from 1969, it lacks their later, better material.

Tommy is a great, great album. Kinda hard to follow if you don't know what's going on, because it's one of those rock operas where the singer changes character from line to line in the album, often changing genders and argument POV's, so it gets confusing. Don't confuse it as an album about pinball; it took Pete Townshend about all of ten minutes to write Pinball Wizard, which is a decent single but not the highlight of the album.

Who's Next, what can you say about the quintessential rock album of the 1970s. This album set the bar for the decade, and I think it's better than Zoso. Although "Won't Get Fooled Again" is a bit overplayed thanks to its CSI coverage, and almost didn't make the album cut.

Quadrophenia is a better rock opera than even Tommy.

The Who By Numbers has some really good songs. I'm afraid I don't listen to Who Are You or Happy Jack all that much, even for the version of Who Are You that you won't hear on corporate radio anymore.

I don't have much of anything else, just a hodgepodge of singles picked up from years ago. Maybe most of Live at Leeds, which is just another live Tommy show, but their rock operas lose a lot of the richer instrumentation when performed live. After that, the only Who I know after the death of Keith Moon is the really great single Eminence Front.

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Excellent Who songs:

I Can't Explain

My Generation

The Kids Are Alright

Substitute

Happy Jack

I Can See For Miles

Magic Bus

Pinball Wizard

The Seeker

Baba O'Riley

Bargain

Behind Blue Eyes

Won't Get Fooled Again

Join Together

Love Reign O'er Me

Squeeze Box

Who Are You

Eminence Front

In other words, they are one of my favorite bands. But let's put The Who aside for a moment, and move on to some Floyd! Almost done with Dark Side Of The Moon at the moment. They're easily my favorite band, but I'm not sure how I would rate this album. Perfect in every sense of the word, yes, but I still feel that I like Animals and Wish You Were Here a little more. Those 3 though, contain some of the best music ever.

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About Chinese Democracy: it IS an amazing album.

Forget about everything you've heard about the album, and ignore the cold reception it has received by so-called critics and just listen to the album from start to finish.

It is absolutely great.

Where TPM highly dissapointed me almost ten years ago (it was - like Chinese Democracy - something I was looking forward to for so long), and KOTCS more recently, Chinese Democracy actually lived up to expectations I thought could never be met.

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I agree that DSOTM is a work of art. It's also the most accessible of all Floyd albums, it's the most mainstream and is the one everyone mentions first when thinking of the band. Well, that and the "song about education," which just irks me. But Animals has some totally awesome instrumental numbers and clever lyrics, and if DSOTM is perfect, than WYWH is more perfect, because of the epic Crazy Diamond pieces that bookend the three songs in the middle.

How do you feel about early Floyd, with Syd Barrett? Early Floyd is completely uninhibited prog rock, especially the Piper album, but it's still very good stuff, though not as good as early Genesis prog. And it took me a while to warm up to Gilmour-era Floyd, which I'm trying to do.

Koray, for as much as you're into classic rock, I highly recommend you visit Wolfgang's Vault and its companion Concert Vault, if you have not done so already. Here's the website: http://concerts.wolfgangsvault.com/. I can think of no other more essential website for rock aficionados than this one.

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I love pretty much all of Pink Floyd. I almost have all their albums, but I kinda just stopped trying to get theme because I have a few duds. I feel I already own all their best music.

I believe I am missing Obscured By Clouds, Atomic Heart Mother, Relics, and The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn. I really should get Piper, and I have listened to the album before. Great stuff.

How does Another Brick In The Wall irritate you?! I will say that The Wall is not their best album, but the entirety of Disc 1 is superb. Can't really say the same about Disc 2. Oh, and Floyd is a band where you absolutely have to listen to them by album, considering each one is pretty much one long song.

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