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What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)


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The former is pointless fan service which not grinds the already slow pace to a halt but again feels completely out of place. "She died. Right, off we go!" Lol.

I have no problem with the pace there. And I think these little things make Aragorn a more interesting character than he is in the theatrical cuts.

I disagree, I think it's redundant. Hence why it was cut.

I love these movies and the original story, but adaptations [of any literary work] must first and foremost speak in the language of film. That's what I want a movie to do for me.

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I disagree, I think it's redundant. Hence why it was cut.

The extended editions are filled with redundancy, but I still love them.

Both TTT and ROTK have a scene with Ian McKellen giving the viewer information that is either irrelevant for the plot, or had been given someplace else in the film. Yet those scenes work because it's McKellen speaking Tolkien's words in full on Shakespearian thesp style! ("The veiling shadow that glowers in the East takes shape....")

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I can't really stand the Eowyn funeral song because it's such a moving scene for a character we have barely met, Theodred. While it does serve as a source of shared grief for both Theoden and Eowyn, there are more important reasons for their pain as the story progresses. More interesting and familiar characters don't get nearly as nice a eulogy, so her song really does bring the story to a halt.

I need to start rewatching the EE's again.

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You people must hate something like The Thin Red Line and its style. It's so redundant, slow, and makes so much of a deal of characters we barely know...

I can't really stand the Eowyn funeral song because it's such a moving scene for a character we have barely met, Theodred. While it does serve as a source of shared grief for both Theoden and Eowyn, there are more important reasons for their pain as the story progresses. More interesting and familiar characters don't get nearly as nice a eulogy, so her song really does bring the story to a halt.

I'm not sure your reasoning makes sense. It looks to me like a logic leap.

We don't need to have met Theodred. The point is: here are this people, and in this story they can die like their Theodred. This complaining about this well put scene seems to me extremely anal and cheap. This collective moment of the people of Edoras is when the idea of facing a common end becomes serious. And it's barely one minute so don't tell me it makes the film too long.

For me it's one of the scenes that make the world we're looking at into a real place. That's why I welcome this scene.

Bealocwealm hafað fréone frecan forth onsended

giedd sculon singan gléomenn sorgiende

on Meduselde thæt he ma no wære

his dryhtne dyrest and maga deorost...

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I'm not sure your reasoning makes sense. It looks to me like a logic leap.

For me it's one of the scenes that make the world we're looking at into a real place. That's why I welcome this scene.

We don't need to have met Theodred. The point is: here are this people, and in this story they can die like their Theodred.

It's awkward, like being invited to a funeral for a friend of a friend, a person you never met, and feeling ashamed that you're not crying.

I appreciate that Middle Earth has funeral scenes because who has died up to this point? Gandalf died, and no women were there to lament, save for the cries in the score, and our heroes had to flee lest the goblins get them. Boromir later died, same story, though we had Enya and Edward Ross to sing. Once our heroes get to Edoras, it's really the first time since Lothlorien they've been able to relax because nobody was chasing them, so sure, if you want to show a woman crying over a dead guy, show it.

But if it helps you think that Middle Earth is more "real" because of it, don't worry, there's probably going to be a flashback soon enough that reminds you about the magical ring that has to be thrown into the lava to be destroyed.

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I appreciate that Middle Earth has funeral scenes because who has died up to this point? Gandalf died, and no women were there to lament, save for the cries in the score, and our heroes had to flee lest the goblins get them.

And our heroes were fucking crying at first, and Aragorn had a face of not believing what he had seen, and they had to run away, and then we had a scene about it in Lothlorien. Which was cut.

But if it helps you think that Middle Earth is more "real" because of it, don't worry, there's probably going to be a flashback soon enough that reminds you about the magical ring that has to be thrown into the lava to be destroyed.

You're justifying my own statement.

While we are at Edoras, we're suddenly more in a film in ancient England that in a film about a war with orcs and ghosts and wizards. Which is the point.

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the regular edition of TTT is just to damned long, anything added would be unbearable. for me that is, as if I needed to say that.

The theatrical edition of TTT is too long, because it leaves out crucial character/plot elements. The extended edition is not too long, it's much better balanced.

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Yes, the theatrical version of TTT can be jarring, because it jumps between the storylines too often, and also has the problem of there are scenes where you might not be as invested in what's going or even be bored because the characters in those scenes are not developed. The EE fixes those problems by enriching all the characters and getting you more invested in the story, and also by staying longer with each storyline before switching to another one. It's a huge improvement.

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They still screwed up Denethor in ROTK.

The actor they cast was brilliant, but my moving his final speech in the book towards his introduction scene in the beginning, they made him far too insane too soon.

I can understand the reason though. In the book Denethor gives a long speech while covered in oil, holding a flaming torch and sitting on a pyre. That simply would not have looked right on screen.

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They still screwed up Denethor in ROTK.

The actor they cast was brilliant, but my moving his final speech in the book towards his introduction scene in the beginning, they made him far too insane too soon.

Yes.

I just wish the movies had explained him using the palantir better

Yes.

Save the screen time for the stupid skull avalanche and add a few more moments of Denethor development, and he could have been great. As it stands, he has great moments, but in the end is a missed opportunity.

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Life of Pi

I won't lie - the first act of the film grated me. It's corniness and wear-it-on-your-sleeves religion grated me, and the framing device of Pi and the reporter seemed useless, at least until the final act. However, once it got going, the film became the most exciting sensory experience since Avatar, maybe even better. Visually, it's beautiful. The 3D is the best I have seen, and the visuals were awe-inspiring. There are also a few sequences in which the aspect ratio shifts, and to great effect - how audacious of Ang Lee! Thematically, it was brilliant. I can't think of any film I have seen in theaters in the last few that has made me feel true sorrow. I was so... destroyed at the end of this film. Certainly, it is one of the best of the year, if not THE best. Up until now, I supported Lincoln for best picture. I have to reconsider.

10/10

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I finally got to see Cloud Atlas last night. The film wanders, and it sure as hell wasn't perfect, but I liked it. Although Hanks' acting in the final segment sort of irked me. I would like to see it again if I get the chance.

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Road To Perdition

A mob film, but one with a twist. Ever since the Godfather mob pics have focused on providing a gritty violence.

This film, while maintaining a sense realism, adopts a more distant, philosophical tone.

Often during scenes of violence the camera pulls away, rather then closer. So when we are shown some actual graphic violence, the effect is stronger.

Also this film is not about the victims, it's about those who commit the crime. The innocent are largely in the background.

Tom Hanks seems like an unlikely choice for a professional killer. Yet it makes sense. As an actor, he exudes a warmth and even while playing an emotionally withdrawn killer, there is still some humanity there. A colder actor would have made the character too distant.

Paul Newman has only a few scenes, but dominates them. He seems to do so little, yet what he does works. Daniel Craig is repulsive as his son. Jude Law as a contract killer is even more scary. A brief conversation between him and Hanks in a dinner is very well done.

This is on the surface a cold film, with motivation and emotions expressed only briefly and reluctantly. Considering most of the characters are lifelong killers, it makes sense to draw them this cautious.

The last film shot by Conrad Hall. It looks gorgeous. From sumptuous night shots in pouring rain to a beautiful white beach. Visual poetry.

The score by Thomas Coolman impresses by not following the clichés of the gangster score. Though there are some Irish influences in the score, Coolman mainly relies on piano, strings and an assortment of synthetic styling to set the mood. His main theme is one of family rather then murder.

Sam Mendes' second film, but directed with a quiet confidence and sense of purpose. It's a very sparse, economical film. He doesn't make a Godfather or Scorsese style gangster film. He had something different in mind and pulled it of.

***1/2 out of ****

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I watched Life of Pi on Sunday. I went in without having read the book, and I thought it was a great film. It's a visually compelling piece of work, very much like Hugo. And like Hugo, it makes great use of 3D. The titular character is played well, and the ending was quite the surprise. I enjoyed this film very much and I didn't expect to.

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Quite unexpectedly, watched Skyfall for the second time earlier tonight (got some free tickets). And I'm glad I did, because the film has grown on me. What seemed schizophernic at first, made sense now. Maybe I just got off on a wrong foot the last time (which happens a lot lately).

I also watched some special features on The Dark Knight Rises home video release. The were saying "grounded in reality" so many times it would make for a good drinking game.

Karol

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The Client

For all the flack Joel Schumacher gets for several of his films, this one is quite good. Susan Sarandon is quite a powerhouse as Reggie Love, and the late Brad Renfro gives a wonderful performance as Mark Sway. Schumacher doesn't put much of his personal touch on the film, but is content to just tell a riveting story that's aged well.

I think Schumacher should stick to more character-driven stories. He excels well in those areas, but not as a Yes-man.

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Did anyone here see "Killing Them Softly" yet?

My coworker saw it over the weekend and actually said something about the score! She said the movie wasn't good, like it was trying too hard to be the next Pulp Fiction type movie, and said throughout the whole movie there speeches by George W Bush and Barack Obama playing in the background that have nothing to do with anything in the movie, and that the musical score was very odd and off-putting, being annoying and taking you out of the film.

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Did anyone here see "Killing Them Softly" yet?

My coworker saw it over the weekend and actually said something about the score! She said the movie wasn't good, like it was trying too hard to be the next Pulp Fiction type movie, and said throughout the whole movie there speeches by George W Bush and Barack Obama playing in the background that have nothing to do with anything in the movie, and that the musical score was very odd and off-putting, being annoying and taking you out of the film.

It's my number one to see at the moment. Going off of the marketing (trailer, posters), the film is heavily steeped in that American Dream fulfillment ideology. Think The Great Gatsby for contemporary cinema. I'm sure there's plenty of reason for including the speeches that are included. Don't mean to be offensive, but the movie may not be for the type of moviegoer your friend is.

I still have high hopes, despite some of the off-putting reviews, cinematography, and runtime, but it's Dominik dammit! Jesse James couldn't have been a fluke. Then again I still haven't seen his first film.

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Did anyone here see "Killing Them Softly" yet?

My coworker saw it over the weekend and actually said something about the score! She said the movie wasn't good, like it was trying too hard to be the next Pulp Fiction type movie, and said throughout the whole movie there speeches by George W Bush and Barack Obama playing in the background that have nothing to do with anything in the movie, and that the musical score was very odd and off-putting, being annoying and taking you out of the film.

It's my number one to see at the moment. Going off of the marketing (trailer, posters), the film is heavily steeped in that American Dream fulfillment ideology. Think The Great Gatsby for contemporary cinema. I'm sure there's plenty of reason for including the speeches that are included. Don't mean to be offensive, but the movie may not be for the type of moviegoer your friend is.

I still have high hopes, despite some of the off-putting reviews, cinematography, and runtime, but it's Dominik dammit! Jesse James couldn't have been a fluke. Then again I still haven't seen his first film.

I've also read negative reviews.

Still have to see Jesse James. I like the score, particularly the tracks Song for Jesse and Song for Bob.

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Did anyone here see "Killing Them Softly" yet?

My coworker saw it over the weekend and actually said something about the score! She said the movie wasn't good, like it was trying too hard to be the next Pulp Fiction type movie, and said throughout the whole movie there speeches by George W Bush and Barack Obama playing in the background that have nothing to do with anything in the movie, and that the musical score was very odd and off-putting, being annoying and taking you out of the film.

It's my number one to see at the moment. Going off of the marketing (trailer, posters), the film is heavily steeped in that American Dream fulfillment ideology. Think The Great Gatsby for contemporary cinema. I'm sure there's plenty of reason for including the speeches that are included. Don't mean to be offensive, but the movie may not be for the type of moviegoer your friend is.

I still have high hopes, despite some of the off-putting reviews, cinematography, and runtime, but it's Dominik dammit! Jesse James couldn't have been a fluke. Then again I still haven't seen his first film.

I've also read negative reviews.

Still have to see Jesse James. I like the score, particularly the tracks Song for Jesse and Song for Bob.

The film and score are among my top favorites.

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I watched the Director's Cut of Alien last night on BR. Very good. I had only ever watched the theatrical cut on the single-disc DVD that I own or via other methods, and while I am no expert on the film, there were several bits that I know were "new" to the cut. Not least of which was the discovery of Dallas. But the image was clean and sharp, the sound was great, blah blah all that. I need a better sound system now, obviously, but I also couldn't have used it when starting the movie at 10 with my downstairs neighbors snoring up through the floor telling me to keep it down. Great movie. The pacing at the beginning is so slow and methodical to set up the idea of this sci-fi world being real and lived in, before going to hell.

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X-Men Origins: Wolverine

A connect the dots prequel that explains a lot about Wolverine, but hold no surprises. Jack man does what he can, but both the script and the direction are so pedestrian. Our hero is supposed to go through hell, but the viewer remains un involved.

CGI is surprisingly obvious in this film, and ruins Patrick Stewarts cameo.

The film passes the time, and but it's one big. "Meh".

Worst of the X-Men films

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