El Jefe

What Is The Last Score You Listened To?

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Lucas, Stefan is a Dutch (is that the right word for someone who lives in The Netherlands?), not an American.

Ooo! The things one can learn when they're being educated about something. What a genial idea! ;)

The specimen shows an interesting, if predictable strain of erratic behavior.

Once again it exhibits an almost obsessive dedication to "prove" that his opinions are valid by providing links and info from other sources. Going far beyond the point of reasonable sharing of info. This points to a deep insecurity. Trying to convince others of it's beliefs that it's passions and opinions are "normal" it is in fact trying to persuade itself that it's behavior does not fall in the category many would find weird, or even deviant.

The lack of structure shows a disorganized mind. Using parentheses within a sentence that's already in parentheses shows the subject has a limited sense in planning, and apparently an inability to observe and correct errors.

Furthermore the evidence displayed in it's posts shows a complete irony-defficiency, not uncommon in North American males, and a total inability to notice when it is being baited.

The subject, while presumably being of reasonable IQ, is obviously led primarily by it's child-like desire to be loved and accepted, and by obsessively trying to attain that, is unable to realize it is in fact turning potential interested people away from it. Not unlike a puppy in a shelter that barks and begs to loudly, is never picked up and eventually gassed.

While the research into the mind of the specimen has provided some limited anthropological interest, and some minor entertainment for it's own sake. Any subsequent follow-up research would presumably be futile since it would lead to a redundant replication of results.

This entire post: Pot, calling the kettle black.

You know, it really says something about your character when even LeHah calls you out on being a bigot. Congratulations, you just went full retard.

My friends agree with me, as evidenced by my recent Facebook post, and the fact that even the board administrator is willing to back you up and not ban you for your excessive display of whiny childish entitlement is equally sad.

But since you said you're dropping it, I guess I'll drop it too. Have fun eating cheetos in your mom's basement while masturbating to porn of Qui-Gon anal fucking young Anakin Skywalker, you sick pedo. Star Wars is for faggots.

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Watch this at 00:55 and then tell me Horner wasn't born 40 years too late. He could have soared a shipload of schmaltzy biblical and historical epics to heaven and beyond.

I love the album version of that cue, with the Tchaikovski's Romeo and Juliet-like horn counterpoint.

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I really don't like the Irish Moss-pipes and their travelogue obviousness but the Vaughan-Williams tinged string writing is wonderful, especially in the longer dramatic sequences (Secret Wedding, Betrayal and Desolation). Sadly, this kind of style has no place in the GAME OF THRONES of today where it actually could contribute a bit more depth.

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The pipes work for me in the hushed opening of the film, and in the cue I posted at the end of the film. Also in The Legend Spreads. Some of their appearances during the battles could be trimmed though, probably.

The string writing is gorgeous as you say, and quite Vaughan Williams inspired, with those warm fifths and sixths in the celli and basses and frequent divisi parts.

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It's impossible to listen in chronological order without using a WAV editor to chop up the tracks. Almost every one has cues from 2 or 3 different parts of the movie smooshed together

Damn that John Williams for ruining my listening pleasure! Who the hell does he think he is?! :lol:

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The album is a wonderful arrangement. Perhaps the strangest choice was combining the schoolyard fight and snow fight cues together in one track, so now there's only one track with that snowy's chase type fun music, instead of two ones sprinkled throughout.

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Epic's a fun score, isn't it?

Though it can be a little bombastic sometimes. It is a fun score. The Tara theme adds enough emotional weight to the more extravagant moments of the score, imo.

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Leonard Bernstein's 1975 Paris recording.

Powerful work. Very engaging, from the dark rising figures of the Kyrie to the flourishes in the Dies Irae to the dramatic Lacrimosa movement and onwards. Definitely recommended for fans of vivid, colourful choral work.

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YES. Even though the recording isn't in surround, listening to that on a surround system is incredible. I'm sure there have been recordings made to more accurately capture the spatial elements of the piece but Bernstein's is magic.

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It was my first recording of the piece, and is still the one I turn to the most.

As with most works, you can't go wrong with a classic Bernstein recording.

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Planet of the Apes by Jerry Goldsmith: Took another listen and I have to say that this is such an ambitious and interesting score, definitely a classic by its sheer audacity and invention yet does carry a powerful dramatic sense despite being strongly avant garde in execution. The action music is simply brilliant, quirky, unsettling and propulsive.

Hella W by Panu Aaltio: Despite the rather odd name this is a score for Finnish film about Hella Wuolijoki, a Finnish writer, politician and activist, whose life and times the film depicts, especially focusing on her treason trial. Quite an atypical dramatic and almost Hollywood-style score for a Finnish film this music is composed largely for a string orchestra, woodwinds and piano with definite noirish vibe to it (the film itself is shot like a film noir almost). Aaltio, a young and up and coming Finnish composer has definitely caught my attention and I intend to follow his career with much anticipation based on this and other works I have heard from him. Very promising indeed.

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Planet of the Apes by Jerry Goldsmith: Took another listen and I have to say that this is such an ambitious and interesting score, definitely a classic by its sheer audacity and invention yet does carry a powerful dramatic sense despite being strongly avant garde in execution. The action music is simply brilliant, quirky, unsettling and propulsive.

Fantastic score obviously. It's a favorite in this household. Aghh, those luminous brass harmonies at the end of The Search Continues....

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I would bundle it with ST:TMP, Alien, and Chinatown and call it a day.

Well yes, I believe you are quite close to the shining crown of his career with that quartet.

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I listened to a few tracks from Quantum Of Solace.


Cute to girls perhaps. But certainly not cute to men, I'd wager. Their designs aren't appealing in my opinion.

Pink and round, boys don't go for that...not until their teenage years. Then pink and round is all they can think about!

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I listened to a few tracks from Quantum Of Solace.

Arnold's masterpiece!

Blech. Unmemorable trash.

Yes, but still better than anything else he's done.

Better than this?

I think not.

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I listened to a few tracks from Quantum Of Solace.

Arnold's masterpiece!

Blech. Unmemorable trash.

Yes, but still better than anything else he's done.

Better than this?

I think not.

All I hear is bargain basement pastiche of John Barry in High Road to China/Out of Africa/Dances with Wolves mode. Blech.

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Brian Tyler - Children of Dune

Wow! This was great! The action music is kind of in between the 90's orchestral action style and the current Powerl/McCreary percussion based action stuff. Really fun! Beyond that, there's some good drama and suspense writing. I love the ethnic flavor the whole score has! Don't have any other comments after only one listen, but this is going to be listened to again by me real soon! Big thanks to the FSM member who sent this to me for free!

Alan Silvestri - The Abyss (Varese Deluxe Edition)

Fantastic presentation of a fantastic score! It's never sounded better, and the extra music really fleshes out the score with some nice new tension, action, and suspense cues. But my favorite stuff is the earlier, alternate versions of some of the big set piece cues. Silvestri intended the love theme to be present throughout the whole score by Cameron seemingly had him re-write cues to de-emphasize the emotion and increase the atmospherics until the finalee. Hearing these never-before-heard alternates is a revelation!

Michael Giacchino - Super 8

Had to dig this one out after this post from Roger Feigelson made me think of it Still a great score, and I don't think the OST presentation is too long so so many others do. This is one of my favorite Giacchino scores.

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Brian Tyler - Children of Dune

Wow! This was great! The action music is kind of in between the 90's orchestral action style and the current Powerl/McCreary percussion based action stuff. Really fun! Beyond that, there's some good drama and suspense writing. I love the ethnic flavor the whole score has! Don't have any other comments after only one listen, but this is going to be listened to again by me real soon! Big thanks to the FSM member who sent this to me for free!

A great score indeed. Tyler's best, in my opinion. LOVE the main theme (the one in Summon The Worms, not the House Atreides one), especially the statements in Reunited and The Revolution. The Inama Nushif theme is another highlight. The action music, is as you said, really good. Rya Wolves for the win!

Easily one of my favourites TV scores.

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It's too bad Sci-Fi didn't make another miniseries for the next Dune books so Tyler could do this again

I still prefer Now You See Me to this, but like I said I only heard this once so far. I really enjoyed it though.

Any idea how complete/incomplete the OST is?

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It's pretty incomplete. If you look at the lines notes, it says Tyler recorded 174 cues cues for the series (and there are only 36 on the album), so there's a LOT missing. Don't know if there's anything unreleased that is really worth having, though. It's a been a while since the last time I saw the series.

Here's a quote, by the way:

 

Greg Yaitanes, director said:

When I got the job for Children Of Dune I knew that musically I wanted a departure from all of Brian's previous work. I wanted to have a seamless blend of ancient instrumentation, an epic orchestral score, and haunting vocals. That's all I told him. Six weeks later Brian had written and recorded 174 original tracks for COD.


http://www.briantyler.com/Site/Children_of_Dune.html

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On 14/01/2014 at 10:30 PM, Jason LeBlanc said:

Just because there are 36 tracks on the CD, doesn't mean it only contains 36 cues. Tracks could contain multiple cues.

 

I know that, but below in the liner notes, the guy says:

 

Quote

174 cues. You are hearing 36 of those on this CD.

 

So, basically, he's not making a difference between "cues" and "tracks". If he is to be believed, then all the tracks each contain just one cue.

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