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Omaha Beach


Josh500
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I'm currently listening to this, and I'm moved to tears. Up until now I've been mostly listening to HTTF when I put on the Saving Private Ryan album, but the first few minutes of OB is really amazing to say the least. I can't put it into words. So exhilarating, soothing, almost heavenly. I guess this is one of those pieces you have to listen to a couple of times before you really start appreciating it. Also, that clarinet solo somewhere halfway through (you know!) is fantastic. Another JW masterpiece... I guess I'll be listening to this for the next couple of days. (Or weeks.)

What are your thoughts on Omaha Beach???

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It's a nice cue that kinda wanders in the middle but doesn't bring me to tears. The scenes that go with the music are different story.

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I generally feel that the score to SPR (not the Hymn) is far to one-noted. Every track is more or less the same, one a little bit more melancholy, one a little bit more brooding, but after a while I just get horribly bored with it and turn it of.

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Well, that's the way I felt AT FIRST too, but after listening to it--I don't know--ten, fifteen times, I began to feel differently about it. This piece is actually more profound that you might think at first listen.

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It's a nice cue that kinda wanders in the middle but doesn't bring me to tears. The scenes that go with the music are different story.

True, combined with the film the music works.

This might be one instance were the score is saved by the film. :)

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SPR is a very polarizing score for the JWfandom. I think it's something that either affects you, or it doesn't, in terms of the album listing experience. Simple as that. For me, I didn't need repeat listens to get into the score. I understood it immediately, and felt compelled to keep listening. It's a haunting CD, and I believe the main theme is one of his most beautiful, and one of his best in general. It's slow, but continually moving up and down, and, more importantly, forward. There's a drive to the theme, despite it's simplicity, and I love it.

Tim

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its one of John's worst efforts. typical of his spielberg connection over the last 10 years, mostly junk

a few notable exceptions, TLW, CMIYC, and WOTW

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I think the cue 'Finding Private Ryan' is one of my favorites. It adds hope, and it's a damn shame that the machine gun scene had to follow this, imo.

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Omaha Beach is indeed one of the most touching pieces on the SPR album. It took a long time for me to start appreciating this score but now I love it. I think it is a cohesive and compelling listening experience. Another moving track is the Last Battle that has a true feeling of closure and finale without it being bombastic. Those final trumpet and horn solos always bring a tear to my eye.

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Actually, this thread is supposed to be about Omaha Beach only.

I have to admit SPR the album as a whole isn't his best... or is it? I have really no idea because I cannot remember ever having listened to the rest of the CD. ;-)

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Yes we know that ment Omaha Beach only but SPR album deserves some praise.

You should listen to it also through , it will give you a very relaxed and peaceful compassion.

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You should listen to it also through , it will give you a very relaxed and peaceful compassion.

Believe me, I have tried. But everytime I make it through the entire CD, (which is not often) I don't have any desire to listen to it for atleast 7 months.

But the Dutch Memorial Day is coming up in a few days, so Hymn For The Falling will be played this week for sure.

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SPR is a very polarizing score for the JWfandom. I think it's something that either affects you, or it doesn't, in terms of the album listing experience. Simple as that. For me, I didn't need repeat listens to get into the score. I understood it immediately, and felt compelled to keep listening. It's a haunting CD, and I believe the main theme is one of his most beautiful, and one of his best in general. It's slow, but continually moving up and down, and, more importantly, forward. There's a drive to the theme, despite it's simplicity, and I love it.

Tim

Omaha Beach is indeed one of the most touching pieces on the SPR album. It took a long time for me to start appreciating this score but now I love it. I think it is a cohesive and compelling listening experience.

I totally agree with you two!!! :P

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"Hymn to the Fallen" is one of the best JW pieces of the last ten years.

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SPR and Schindler's are both so heart-breakingly beautiful I can't listen to them for very long without getting both inspired and truly sad. Like good wine, it seems these scores need a more sophisticated musical pallette to be fully appreciated. I think Williams' more "delicate" scores are overlooked by folks wanting the big payoff immediately (Jurassic Park, Superman, Radiers, etc) with in-your-face themes and action music. The music on SPF is called "underscore," something Williams doesn't compose often (usually going the big "Hi, I'm a theme!" route).

SPR has some of the most haunting, beautiful, and best-orchestrated underscore...if you listen to it. The cues do NOT all sound the same (like Williams would say, "Hmmm, I don't really have anything important to say here - I'll just repeat myself over and over again for the entire score."). You just need an ear ti descerne the differences.

For me, toss it in the same pile as Schindler's List, Angela's Ashes, and Stanley's Iris (sorry, had to keep up the 'posessive name/noun' pattern). That is, some of the best dramatic underscore Williams has written.

And if anyone is insulted by my insinuation of a needing a more sophisticated musical pallette, my discomfiture is only tempered by the temerity of my youth.

Jason

(Btw, I attended a 'patriotic' symphony concert with Copland, Strauss, Gershwin, etc. Hymn to the Fallen was the piece they chose to close the concert, with a full 70 piece choir and an extra 15 musicians (mostly in the brass). Needless to say, it brought tears to my eyes and gives me goosebumps just thinking about it. Indeed one of Williams most powerful pieces.)

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At precisely 4.58 into this beautiful cue we have another perfect example of Williams' master craftmanship when the score is coupled with the film - it leaved a lump in my throat everytime:

The mother is at the kitchen sink and we see a reflection of the car containing army officials and priest on their way to inform Mrs. Ryan of the terrible news (unbeknownst to her). She looks up once then looks down, Williams then employs a tender horn solo as if to cry from the heart of Mrs. Ryan as she now suddenly looks up again and realises the purpose of the car's visit. The camera then slowly pans left accompanied by soft woodwinds.

Simply stunning piece of scoring that never ceases to move me. The Brass writing and indeed playing is second to none throughout the score so I have to admit it disappoints me that many members don't appreciate this work, but I understand it's an acquired taste.

- Tim.

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I'm currently listening to this, and I'm moved to tears. Up until now I've been mostly listening to HTTF when I put on the Saving Private Ryan album, but the first few minutes of OB is really amazing to say the least. I can't put it into words. So exhilarating, soothing, almost heavenly. I guess this is one of those pieces you have to listen to a couple of times before you really start appreciating it. Also, that clarinet solo somewhere halfway through (you know!) is fantastic. Another JW masterpiece... I guess I'll be listening to this for the next couple of days. (Or weeks.)

What are your thoughts on Omaha Beach???

It took me a long time to discover it but I find it a very warm score.

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At precisely 4.58 into this beautiful cue we have another perfect example of Williams' master craftmanship when the score is coupled with the film - it leaved a lump in my throat everytime:

The mother is at the kitchen sink and we see a reflection of the car containing army officials and priest on their way to inform Mrs. Ryan of the terrible news (unbeknownst to her). She looks up once then looks down, Williams then employs a tender horn solo as if to cry from the heart of Mrs. Ryan as she now suddenly looks up again and realises the purpose of the car's visit. The camera then slowly pans left accompanied by soft woodwinds.

Simply stunning piece of scoring that never ceases to move me. The Brass writing and indeed playing is second to none throughout the score so I have to admit it disappoints me that many members don't appreciate this work, but I understand it's an acquired taste.

- Tim.

I totally agree with you there, Tim, especially what you said about that one scene. Except I don't think it's a horn solo--that's a clarinet, isn't it, coupled with oboe or English horn or something like that. Yeah, so subtle, but definitely one of the highlights of this masterful score.

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At precisely 4.58 into this beautiful cue we have another perfect example of Williams' master craftmanship when the score is coupled with the film - it leaved a lump in my throat everytime:

The mother is at the kitchen sink and we see a reflection of the car containing army officials and priest on their way to inform Mrs. Ryan of the terrible news (unbeknownst to her). She looks up once then looks down, Williams then employs a tender horn solo as if to cry from the heart of Mrs. Ryan as she now suddenly looks up again and realises the purpose of the car's visit. The camera then slowly pans left accompanied by soft woodwinds.

Simply stunning piece of scoring that never ceases to move me. The Brass writing and indeed playing is second to none throughout the score so I have to admit it disappoints me that many members don't appreciate this work, but I understand it's an acquired taste.

- Tim.

I totally agree with you there, Tim, especially what you said about that one scene. Except I don't think it's a horn solo--that's a clarinet, isn't it, coupled with oboe or English horn or something like that. Yeah, so subtle, but definitely one of the highlights of this masterful score.

Pretty certain it is a French horn Josh, unless my ears are deceiving me suddenly!?!

- Tim.

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At precisely 4.58 into this beautiful cue we have another perfect example of Williams' master craftmanship when the score is coupled with the film - it leaved a lump in my throat everytime:

The mother is at the kitchen sink and we see a reflection of the car containing army officials and priest on their way to inform Mrs. Ryan of the terrible news (unbeknownst to her). She looks up once then looks down, Williams then employs a tender horn solo as if to cry from the heart of Mrs. Ryan as she now suddenly looks up again and realises the purpose of the car's visit. The camera then slowly pans left accompanied by soft woodwinds.

Simply stunning piece of scoring that never ceases to move me. The Brass writing and indeed playing is second to none throughout the score so I have to admit it disappoints me that many members don't appreciate this work, but I understand it's an acquired taste.

- Tim.

I totally agree with you there, Tim, especially what you said about that one scene. Except I don't think it's a horn solo--that's a clarinet, isn't it, coupled with oboe or English horn or something like that. Yeah, so subtle, but definitely one of the highlights of this masterful score.

Pretty certain it is a French horn Josh, unless my ears are deceiving me suddenly!?!

- Tim.

Yep, listened to it again... and you're right. That's a French horn! I thought you were talking about the clarinet solo which comes soon thereafter when Mrs. Ryan slowly moves to the door. Cause that's the part I especially like. :lol:

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If I had to ditch one CD of John Williams, I would be Saving Private Ryan.

Alex - listening to SPR right now

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If I had to ditch one CD of John Williams, I would be Saving Private Ryan.

Alex - listening to SPR right now

I would too, anyone want my copy of SPR?

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actually I am Alex, the phantom zone version of Alex,

Titanic sucks, Blade Runner is awesome, and Batman Begins is the best

ahhh beer

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You're hurting my feelings, Joe. I was never a fan of Batman Begins. I must conclude that you don't really know me. :)

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I thought you liked it, you at least argued in favor of it for the lack of cgi, oh well, I don't care much for it, its ok, but only ok

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If I had to ditch one CD of John Williams, I would be Saving Private Ryan.

Alex - listening to SPR right now

I would too, anyone want my copy of SPR?

Come on guys, it's not that bad - there are far inferior scores! Even if you don't like the film either, you can't deny it works beautifully with it at least?

- Tim.

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How can you not like the film?

I meant even if Joe & Alex don't like the film they must at least appreciate the score with the film as a fine work.

I certainly don't rate it as a brilliant film but it has great moments.

- Tim.

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I like SPR, the film, mainly for the two war scenes. Amazing directing. The scenes in between were ... ok.

I sorta like Batman Begins too but I had problems with the confusing fights. I know that this was intentional but I couldn't see what was going on and so I became distracted. I also didn't like Gordon, who acted as a goofy sidekick when he has to drive the batmobile. It was meant as funny but I'm tired of this type of humor. It's been done to death.

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