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Nicholas Hooper Interview

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There's no point in asking whether he'll be back, we'll get something like "I really enjoyed this one and I hope I'm on board for the next, David Yates has never complained about my work". I doubt he's been signed already, and even if they replace him I doubt they would tell him right when this movie is about to open.

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Tim, I would just ignore this thread and ask your own questions.

Great, with that comment you discourage all the thought that was put into questions and regard all those

who post here as dumb and not worthy to be taken serious

With all due respect please think before you make a post like that. Otherwise you really can't be taken serious!!!

Nor can your insulting accusations passed off as "questions" be taken seriously.

Thank you Henry. I'm sorry you feel personally insulted, but if Tim is trying to conduct a professional interview (and I know he is, quality chap that he is) then he's better off ignoring most of the suggestions here.

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Just out of curiosity, who is Alan (I am not always up to date about who is behind which Avatar)?

Anyway, after reading this entire blog I'm not sure if I should even be interested in the outcome of the interview. The questions I would like to have answered will never be asked out of diplomacy (what I understand, who wants to jeopardize job and/or reputation), and I'm not really interested so much in the technical issues of this mediocre piece of music.

One thing that comes to mind when reading the posts here is that most people preferred not to ask any questions but to ridicule other people's, even though many of these were considered seriously (yes, I actually think most people actually asking something were aware that these ideas would have to be rephrased, but that that's the job of the interviewer). In summary, why did I even waste my time here.

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Just out of curiosity, who is Alan (I am not always up to date about who is behind which Avatar)?

Sorry. Once in a blue moon, I'll append "- Alan" at the end of my posts, but I'm generally too lazy to do so.

Alan posts under the name of "Hlao-roo" ( I have to be honest, I am curious as to how that name came about).

The affectionate nickname of a Watership Down character I regard fondly.

Hlao-roo was his original screen name. Then he switched to Alan, and recently went back to his original screen name. i.e. indysolo=Neil S. Bulk, TheGreatEye=Quint

Yeah, partly because it seemed trendy at the time to go with a plausible-sounding name (real or pseudonymous) for one's member name. I finally decided I was most comfortable with my original moniker.

That being said, there absolutely are ways of asking more probing (and potentially critical) questions without stabbing a composer in the heart. There's an art to a good interview, one that I make no claim of having perfected but at least am always improving in. Part of it comes in just discovering what the composer's personality is like, whether they have a sense of humor, and what your rapport with them is like. It's hard to predict these things, but almost every composer I've interviewed has been incredibly humble, jovial, candid, and even self-depracating. When that's the case it's hard to retain much in the way of criticism (let alone anger or condescension), but it also allows for some critical or challenging questions to be asked.

Best wishes on the interview, Tim. I can only imagine how tricky these things can be, but, at least on your end, I feel confident it'll go well.

Anyway, after reading this entire blog I'm not sure if I should even be interested in the outcome of the interview. The questions I would like to have answered will never be asked out of diplomacy (what I understand, who wants to jeopardize job and/or reputation), and I'm not really interested so much in the technical issues of this mediocre piece of music.

One thing that comes to mind when reading the posts here is that most people preferred not to ask any questions but to ridicule other people's, even though many of these were considered seriously (yes, I actually think most people actually asking something were aware that these ideas would have to be rephrased, but that that's the job of the interviewer). In summary, why did I even waste my time here.

To be fair, one can ask only so many "critical" questions before the subject begins to feel as though he is under siege. There's something to be said for holding politicians' feet to the fire, but FSM is hardly Meet the Press. This interview is neither the time nor place to vent one's disapproval of the composer's legitimate artistic choices or his general stylistic propensities. Tim has indicated that he will try to tease out as much as possible Hooper's reasoning behind his being so sparing with his predecessors' thematic material, but, in the end, we must accept that it's the composer's prerogative.

I am interested in why he thinks that a very restrained, quiet, and simple approach does do justice to the drama and fantasy of Harry Potter (which in my opinion, as apparently in those of Williams and Doyle, begs for boldness and color).

Somewhere in here there's a fair question to be asked. I think the best thing to do would be to use the composer's own words -- he has referred to his Harry Potter writing as "simpler" to that of Williams -- and ask him to clarify what that means. Depending on his reply, one could perhaps ask if a more elaborate approach might not be more befitting of the complex fantasy universe of Harry Potter.

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Something I'd have liked to ask him is would he gracefully stepped down if John Williams did decide to return? Would he consider it an honour to have kept the maestro's seat warm and would he think it would add merit to the series to let Williams return or to continue developing the scores in his own style? Of course, that's not likely a question he'd want to answer.

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Let's be fair here, it's not Nicholas Hooper's fault that the recent Harry Potter scores are so bad...

Well, he wrote them, so it's his fault more than anybody else's...

Something I'd have liked to ask him is would he gracefully stepped down if John Williams did decide to return?

This yes.

Would he consider it an honour to have kept the maestro's seat warm and would he think it would add merit to the series to let Williams return or to continue developing the scores in his own style?

This no. "Kept the maestro's seat warm?" :) This'd make him sound so redundant somehow...

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Let's be fair here, it's not Nicholas Hooper's fault that the recent Harry Potter scores are so bad...

Who else can it be?

Something I'd have liked to ask him is would he gracefully stepped down if John Williams did decide to return?

Well, I'd like to know that too, but I can't imagine how you'd word it without effectively without saying "ok, we both know John Williams is much better than you. Will you let him do the last one without a tantrum?"

Difficult thing is that he's acknowledged that his composing style is 'simple', but doesn't seem to really grasp that the Potter world needs something bigger and more magical. He was very defensive in that aussie interview for OOtP when the guy suggested there weren't any themes and it lacked magic.

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Let's be fair here, it's not Nicholas Hooper's fault that the recent Harry Potter scores are so bad...

Who else can it be?

David Yates. Fully aware of Hooper's abilities and his pre-existing "documentary flourish" limited style, sacrificed a couple of amazing worldwide movie scores to appease a friend, or if you will, for the ease of working with someone with whom he's familiar.

Also to be fair, the first oversight can be forgiven, but letting him come back for a second movie is unforgiveable. I haven't seen the movie, but if it works as mediocrely as OOTP's did in-film as it is mediocre by itself and as everyone else here is saying, and unless Hooper put a gun to Yates' or the movie's producers' heads, then this is a failure at the hands of the executives and the director.

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Also to be fair, the first oversight can be forgiven, but letting him come back for a second movie is unforgiveable. I haven't seen the movie, but if it works as mediocrely as OOTP's did in-film as it is mediocre by itself and as everyone else here is saying, and unless Hooper put a gun to Yates' or the movie's producers' heads, then this is a failure at the hands of the executives and the director.

Yes, I agree. One might say, Yates gave Hooper a chance, put him on the map. Ok, he's a friend and he (might have) shown promise. But no need to go overboard.

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Well yes, I was thinking more 'who is responsible for Hooper not having the talent required to score a Potter movie', but that's a valid point too Dan.

Putting yourself in his situation though, the idea of rejecting someone you've worked with for years can't be an easy thing to do, especially when the man's so self-confident in his abilities. The line between a relationship and professional duties must be agonizing sometimes.

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If only Hooper at least had Williams' humility, if he can't have his skillz. In a dream world:

Hooper: "David, you need a composer far better than I am to score this movie."

Yates: "Yes, I know, but they're all dead, except for John Williams, with whom I'll be happy to replace you."

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If only Hooper at least had Williams' humility, if he can't have his skillz. In a dream world:

Hooper: "David, you need a composer far better than I am to score this movie."

Yates: "Yes, I know, but they're all dead, except for John Williams, with whom I'll be happy to replace you."

I think the more talented and good you are, the more humble you have to be. Otherwise you'll come across as a braggart or a jerk.

Which explains why Nicholas Hooper isn't humble.

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If only Hooper at least had Williams' humility, if he can't have his skillz. In a dream world:

Hooper: "David, you need a composer far better than I am to score this movie."

Yates: "Yes, I know, but they're all dead, except for John Williams, with whom I'll be happy to replace you."

I think the more talented and good you are, the more humble you have to be. Otherwise you'll come across as a braggart or a jerk.

Which explains why Nicholas Hooper isn't humble.

That's ridiculous. Take Cristiano Ronaldo, who is a complete asshole who loves himself, but is without doubt one of the top three footballers on the planet.

It would be nice for everyone to be humble, but it doesn't share exclusivity with talent.

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If only Hooper at least had Williams' humility, if he can't have his skillz. In a dream world:

Hooper: "David, you need a composer far better than I am to score this movie."

Yates: "Yes, I know, but they're all dead, except for John Williams, with whom I'll be happy to replace you."

I think the more talented and good you are, the more humble you have to be. Otherwise you'll come across as a braggart or a jerk.

Which explains why Nicholas Hooper isn't humble.

That's ridiculous. Take Cristiano Ronaldo, who is a complete asshole who loves himself, but is without doubt one of the top three footballers on the planet.

It would be nice for everyone to be humble, but it doesn't share exclusivity with talent.

Read carefully what I wrote! :P I didn't say all talented people are humble. Far from it.

Ronaldo is--to use your word--an asshole exactly because he is not humble.

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If only Hooper at least had Williams' humility, if he can't have his skillz. In a dream world:

Hooper: "David, you need a composer far better than I am to score this movie."

Yates: "Yes, I know, but they're all dead, except for John Williams, with whom I'll be happy to replace you."

I think the more talented and good you are, the more humble you have to be. Otherwise you'll come across as a braggart or a jerk.

Which explains why Nicholas Hooper isn't humble.

That's ridiculous. Take Cristiano Ronaldo, who is a complete asshole who loves himself, but is without doubt one of the top three footballers on the planet.

It would be nice for everyone to be humble, but it doesn't share exclusivity with talent.

Read carefully what I wrote! :P I didn't say all talented people are humble. Far from it.

Ronaldo is--to use your word--an asshole exactly because he is not humble.

What I read was "Hooper is less talented because he is not humble". Sorry if I'm misconstruing what you said, but that's how I interpreted it.

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What I read was "Hooper is less talented because he is not humble". Sorry if I'm misconstruing what you said, but that's how I interpreted it.

No, what I meant was Hooper doesn't need to be humble because he isn't very talented or good.

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No, but I can assume they at least refer to the music Hooper composed, rather than aiming petty comments at the man himself.

Actually no. You should read some of the reviews.

BTW, Mr. Breathmask, are you Nicholas Hooper? :P

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No, but I can assume they at least refer to the music Hooper composed, rather than aiming petty comments at the man himself.

Well I for one have been leveling my criticisms at the director/producers more than anything. I also called him Hooper Pooper but that wasn't going out of my way to attack him, it just sort of came out naturally and I found it amusing and somewhat apt.

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I spoke with Nicholas Hooper yesterday (the interview got delayed), and I can assure all of you that he is a very humble and kind man.

He explained a little why he chose to take the series in a totally different musical direction. He testified of his admiration of John Williams. (I won't go into more detail, because I want everyone to subscribe to FSM Online!)

The one juicy tidbit, which I also mentioned in the interminable "Williams may score seventh Potter film" thread, is that Hooper is bowing out of the series altogether. He told me that the films have put too great a strain on his family life, and that he always thought that a certain composer "whose name I know well" should finish out the series, "since he started it."

Have fun with this news. And check out this month's issue of FSM for oodles and oodles of moi!

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The one juicy tidbit, which I also mentioned in the interminable "Williams may score seventh Potter film" thread, is that Hooper is bowing out of the series altogether.

That's good news for us ;)

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The one juicy tidbit, which I also mentioned in the interminable "Williams may score seventh Potter film" thread, is that Hooper is bowing out of the series altogether. He told me that the films have put too great a strain on his family life, and that he always thought that a certain composer "whose name I know well" should finish out the series, "since he started it."

Seriously, please don't joke about such things.

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If this is true (and it adds up with the producers trying to get Williams back) and we're going to get two more Potter scores from Williams.

Woooohoooooooooooooooo!!!!

And if they don't manage to get him back... yay... we're at least going to get two scores by a real, film composer.

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No, but I can assume they at least refer to the music Hooper composed, rather than aiming petty comments at the man himself.

Well I for one have been leveling my criticisms at the director/producers more than anything. I also called him Hooper Pooper but that wasn't going out of my way to attack him, it just sort of came out naturally and I found it amusing and somewhat apt.

Hooper Pooper? ;):lol:

I call him Hooperman.

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The one juicy tidbit, which I also mentioned in the interminable "Williams may score seventh Potter film" thread, is that Hooper is bowing out of the series altogether. He told me that the films have put too great a strain on his family life, and that he always thought that a certain composer "whose name I know well" should finish out the series, "since he started it."

I wonder... what has his family life got to do with this? Seriously?

Because he spends too much time working?? ;)

So now the only obstacle is schedule conflicts!

I am more convinced than ever now... John Williams will come back.

He would have scored 4 out of 7 movies then. :lol:

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Hooper struck me as a very humble, down-to-earth, "simple" kind of guy. Most of his professional life has consisted of writing small scores for "small" projects. Even for Harry Potter he didn't have to leave London.

Harry Potter represents the first (and only) giant, Hollywood scoring experience he's had, and I think it was quite hard on him (what with the time constraints, studio pressure, etc.). I got the impression that he'd be content just leading a quiet life in London from now on, without dabbling in mega blockbusters like this anymore.

I felt quite sympathetic towards the chap, really.

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