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karelm

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karelm last won the day on April 5

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About karelm

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  1. I am listening to the complete set of string quartets of Shostakovich by the Borodin Quartet. Superb!
  2. I was playing with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra for their then annual orchestra academy. The first night I got there, they played WSS live to film so went to see them play before we started our rehearsals the next day. We played Wagner's Die Mestersingers of Nuremburg, Respighi's Fountains of Rome, Rimsky-Korsakav's Scheherazade, and a few other things I can't remember.
  3. I saw the original film in theater only recently in a live to picture concert at Baltimore and it blew me away! Aside from the music, what was most noticeable is how it straddled eras so well. The first half is a film of the 50's, a bit cheesy, silly, and corny (the snapping dances and officer krupke silly song). The second half is a film of the 60's, gritty, dark, and erupting in volatile youth rage just about to explode with the counter culture movement. The film bridges these eras so beautifully and then there is the great score, great dancing, great directing, great cinematography, etc
  4. I strongly prefer Jerry's 60's and 70's synths/electronics over the 80's and 90's. For example, I loathe the cheesy synth score of "Not Without My Daughter" (1991) in contrast to Logan's Run (1975) or STTMP (1978) where I either love the electronic score or find it so well blended that the acoustic instruments and electronic instruments blend to make a perfect hybrid entity ala vyger.
  5. Apes did not use a synth. No tuba either. The closest thing to a synth was sometimes it used an electronic harp which might have just been an echoplex on the harp used very sparingly. The primitive percussive music were all from Emil Richards's private collection of instruments Mr. Richards collected as he toured the world as a studio drummer. He would visit the local music shops and end up owning some new instrument some of which had very primitive/ethnic timbres give the score its unique feel. He played on every Apes film for all composers from 1968 through 2017's War for the Planet of
  6. Sabrina? And his early 50s and 60's stuff I thought were more rom com.
  7. Has anyone come up with a list of movies JW has scored by genre and sub genre? Earlier, I was thinking, "I wonder what a period romance score by JW would have sounded like" but then I remember we know this because Jane Eyre is set in the early 1800s. Period action piece would be The Patriot so we have good references. It would be nice to imagine what a spy thriller would sound like from him. But isn't that kind of like "Catch me if you can?" Biblical epic? I think there is some of that in Raider's with the map room and the power of the ark. Musical? Sort of...if you consider his involv
  8. There was a post Star Wars interview where he said his next project was a film for Ridley Scott called Alien. But as far as I know, no mention of why it went to Goldsmith instead. Don't get me wrong, huge fan of what Goldsmith did, just wish we heard what JW would have done too.
  9. I wish he had scored Alien as he planned to but sort of think his approach would have been like the first half of CEOTK so we kind of got that.
  10. Glad this topic was bumped, I missed it the first time and love this stuff!
  11. I randomly bumped into him once at Nordstrom store a few blocks from where I live. He was literally looking through a rack of flannel shirts. It was so surreal and out of context I couldn't connect the dots till later!
  12. That's a solid piece. Well done! If I had anything constructive to add, this could be a longer piece just allowing a bit more ebb and flow of the very same material you have, just taking more space to state it at the start. There is a balance between taking too long to get to the point and rushing to the point. I think Ralph Vaughan Williams really nails the balance in his symphonies, probably best in his No. 5, but generally he is very good at the balance between overstaying an idea's welcome and giving it time enough to breathe. I really liked it!
  13. I prefer JFK but could be because I liked the film and man a lot more. Perhaps I need to revisit Nixon though as I can't remember anything about it.
  14. Wow, so just at the end of his first season. Fascinating. So Raiders of the Lost Ark had just premiered a few days earlier than this interview for context. ROTLA premiered June 12, 1981.
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