Quintus

Video Game Music

763 posts in this topic

That's not it. I mean, obviously the 8-bit sounds contribute to the issue, but they have a certain charm to them. My problem is with the composition itself. Stereotypical video game music performed by a live orchestra tends to still sound like stereotypical video game music.

Time to bring out the big guns, then.

(The music "really" start at 1:22 in the second video). If that doesn't make you change your mind, at least for a bit, then maybe VG music is not made for you (or maybe you're not made for VG music.:lol: You choose).

The part starting at 3:43...:lol: I would like to hear more of that in orchestral game concerts.

Oh, it does NOT get much better than that. Twilight Princess is the best Zelda score, hands down.

Ocarina Of Time score is one of the best for me : The Song of Storms, The Lost Woods, Gerudo Valley...That's Zelda music at its finest (followed closely by A Link To The Past and Link's Awakening).

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Whatever. I'm not arguing with someone who's being racist about their brands of music as if music were something to assign race to.

:joy: All music is not created equal. I enjoy some of it more than I enjoy other music, just like everyone else. If our tastes differ, that's fine. I'm just stating my own personal tastes, and I apologize if I gave the impression that my views were anything more than that.

If anyone doesn't enjoy that I have to seriously question their taste in music.

That's an excellent piece. Now show me a significant number of video game scores that maintain that level of quality throughout, and I'll be happy to revise my opinion. :D I mean, John Williams' concert suites and main titles and whatnot are great, but I wouldn't be much of a fan of his if that's all he'd written.

Time to bring out the big guns, then.

(The music "really" start at 1:22 in the second video). If that doesn't make you change your mind, at least for a bit, then maybe VG music is not made for you (or maybe you're not made for VG music.:P You choose).

The part starting at 3:43...:thumbup: I would like to hear more of that in orchestral game concerts.

I like the Chrono Cross stuff, although I've heard another arrangement that I preferred. As for the Zelda stuff...well, I'm sorry, but one of the themes that crops up so often in that arrangement really rubs me the wrong way. Don't like it at all. It's a really well-done arrangement, but that's not enough to compensate for the melody just flat-out annoying me. The rest of the material is pretty good, but still nothing I feel any particular need to listen to again. Which is the same reaction I have to all the other music posted above.

Sorry, I must sound like a total troll bringing all my negativity into these threads. :P I truly am happy for anyone who enjoys this stuff more than I do, and it's not like there's something objectively wrong with the music. It just doesn't usually do much for me unless I have an attachment to the game.

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On a whim played through the Harry Potter and The Halfblood Prince game and was amazed at how much better the score was than Hooper's. James Hannigan demonstrates more talent in the first 30 seconds of this track than the entirety of Hooper's tragically underwhelming score. Game sucked, but that's another matter entirely.

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Hannigan's score for the Order of the Phoenix game is also miles better than the film's score.

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I keep hearing good things about that. I'll have to look into that one at some point.

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Sorry, I must sound like a total troll bringing all my negativity into these threads. :)

Hey, everyone is entitled to his own opinion, even you.;) It's always nice to have at least one person with a different opinion in a thread. If there was none, every thread would only be one page long !

Concerning the Zelda stuff, well, too bad you didn't like it.:(

Glad you liked the Chrono Cross medley, though. All this will not have been in vain.:D

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If anyone doesn't enjoy that I have to seriously question their taste in music.

This is amazing. Thanks for posting!

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If anyone doesn't enjoy that I have to seriously question their taste in music.

That's an excellent piece. Now show me a significant number of video game scores that maintain that level of quality throughout, and I'll be happy to revise my opinion. :) I mean, John Williams' concert suites and main titles and whatnot are great, but I wouldn't be much of a fan of his if that's all he'd written.

Well all his Medal Of Honor scores and the entire score to the above cue.

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Accept he's not the next JW or JG, sorry.

I feel like you meant to say "except', but both work, strangely...

I think Video games have promising and terrible composers, just like with film. I don't think they're really any different in terms of quality or "where to look for the next JW/JG".

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Temple of Doom?

That might be it. I'm not very familiar with this score (Shame on me !), so could you be more specific ? Which part in particular from this score ?

Sounds a bit like Goldsmith's The Wind and the Lion.

Can't be this one, never listened to it.

I appreciate the help !;)

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That's high on my list of scores to listen to.

Mine too. I need to buy it first, though. I've just heard it through compilations and live performances, and things like that Goldsmith documentary.

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Being a child of the 80's I've wasted entire days just listening to music from this site.

Also, a friend of mine put me onto this track from the StarCraft 2 soundtrack. Get past the opening few seconds of homage and it gets incredibly awesome. The first slow theme even feels a bit Goldsmith-y. Sadly I don't know whose actually responsible for this.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJA5mc3pCBE

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Well all his Medal Of Honor scores and the entire score to the above cue.

Not from what I've heard...the MOH stuff starts to annoy me a lot of the time.

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Well all his Medal Of Honor scores and the entire score to the above cue.

Not from what I've heard...the MOH stuff starts to annoy me a lot of the time.

MOH... more like MEH!

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Being a child of the 80's I've wasted entire days just listening to music from this site.

Also, a friend of mine put me onto this track from the StarCraft 2 soundtrack. Get past the opening few seconds of homage and it gets incredibly awesome. The first slow theme even feels a bit Goldsmith-y. Sadly I don't know whose actually responsible for this.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJA5mc3pCBE

Sounds good. And yes, very Goldsmith-meets-Arnold-like. Much better than most video game music that I've heard. I want that!

There's even Philospher's stone theme in there at around 4:40. :)

Karol

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Also, a friend of mine put me onto this track from the StarCraft 2 soundtrack. Get past the opening few seconds of homage and it gets incredibly awesome. The first slow theme even feels a bit Goldsmith-y. Sadly I don't know whose actually responsible for this.

IMDB gives first props to Neal Acree. The site I found with it also credits Glen Stafford, Derek Dude, and Russell Brower.

Whoever they are.

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Well all his Medal Of Honor scores and the entire score to the above cue.

Not from what I've heard...the MOH stuff starts to annoy me a lot of the time.

MOH... more like MEH!

Uncool bro. :mrgreen:

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Please, you are from Texas. You should be tougher then that.

MOH is indeed MEH!

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Indeed. One wonders if we're possibly looking in the wrong place, for the next John Williams, or Jerry Goldsmith.

If you're looking to the realm of video game scorse, you probably are. That's not to say they're unsuccessful, though. I mean they've got huge fanbases. But the sad truth of the matter, is that the vast majority of these 'composers' no longer write their scores, they play and record through a MIDI keyboard, sequencer and sample library - getting orchestrators and conductors to perform via proxy. Which further dilutes the composer's own creative voice, especially if his mock-ups and Finale/Sibelius sheets are undeveloped, resulting in the dozen or so orchestrators making their mark. To make matters worse, most of these aren't trained in composition, harmony, orchestration and counterpoint, meaning they've got about as much musical expertise as your average 10 year piano student.

So that's an entirely different approach and experience from the traditional one that bred us the likes of John Williams and Jerry Goldsmith. Without ever fostering the skill of hearing an entire orchestra and various tone colours in one's head, because they've got the instant reward of the sampled orchestra in front of them. From what I've found, handwritten scores tend to have a unity and meta-structure to them that I've never heard on a track cooked up on Pro Tools + VSL/ES. One tends to self-critique (which can be harmful in excess, take Paul Dukas) and self-analysis more, when one has a piano and that daunting blank manuscript paper in front of you. Whereas a MIDI set-up is an entirely different mentality. Personally, I don't know about you, but I find writing out say a septuplet run on a written score, a hell of a lot less time consuming than any of the possible keyboard short cuts or mouse manoeuvring on Finale. That's one of the reasons why I gave up on notational software, the clumsiness of it all, but also the expensiveness of it. Whereas I can I buy a book of manuscript paper for £7.99.

So for now, unless video game and film composers start realise the cost to creativity their digital approach and lack of training ensues, nothing's going to change.

And as for most film makers needing mockups for every cue, I say screw em. Setup a contract that includes a clause that states 'You shall not require that this composer should produce any mockup.'

I honestly miss the age when film makers trusted composers enough to not demand an ad verbatim digital reconstruction of the entire score, for them to preview. Sure, a lot of hearts get broken, but that's part of the business.

Though if you do want to play along, team up with a Sample Library guro to mockup cues from your score.

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Please, you are from Texas. You should be tougher then that.

MOH is indeed MEH!

I think you're a dickhead for posting this.

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Indeed. One wonders if we're possibly looking in the wrong place, for the next John Williams, or Jerry Goldsmith.

If you're looking to the realm of video game scorse, you probably are. That's not to say they're unsuccessful, though. I mean they've got huge fanbases. But the sad truth of the matter, is that the vast majority of these 'composers' no longer write their scores, they play and record through a MIDI keyboard, sequencer and sample library - getting orchestrators and conductors to perform via proxy. Which further dilutes the composer's own creative voice, especially if his mock-ups and Finale/Sibelius sheets are undeveloped, resulting in the dozen or so orchestrators making their mark. To make matters worse, most of these aren't trained in composition, harmony, orchestration and counterpoint, meaning they've got about as much musical expertise as your average 10 year piano student.

So that's an entirely different approach and experience from the traditional one that bred us the likes of John Williams and Jerry Goldsmith. Without ever fostering the skill of hearing an entire orchestra and various tone colours in one's head, because they've got the instant reward of the sampled orchestra in front of them. From what I've found, handwritten scores tend to have a unity and meta-structure to them that I've never heard on a track cooked up on Pro Tools + VSL/ES. One tends to self-critique (which can be harmful in excess, take Paul Dukas) and self-analysis more, when one has a piano and that daunting blank manuscript paper in front of you. Whereas a MIDI set-up is an entirely different mentality. Personally, I don't know about you, but I find writing out say a septuplet run on a written score, a hell of a lot less time consuming than any of the possible keyboard short cuts or mouse manoeuvring on Finale. That's one of the reasons why I gave up on notational software, the clumsiness of it all, but also the expensiveness of it. Whereas I can I buy a book of manuscript paper for £7.99.

So for now, unless video game and film composers start realise the cost to creativity their digital approach and lack of training ensues, nothing's going to change.

And as for most film makers needing mockups for every cue, I say screw em. Setup a contract that includes a clause that states 'You shall not require that this composer should produce any mockup.'

I honestly miss the age when film makers trusted composers enough to not demand an ad verbatim digital reconstruction of the entire score, for them to preview. Sure, a lot of hearts get broken, but that's part of the business.

Though if you do want to play along, team up with a Sample Library guro to mockup cues from your score.

Sigh, for the sake of conversation I share a rhetorical musing at the beginning of the thread and you respond with a frankly pointless diatribe in which you lecture me on the pros of traditional compositional technique vs modern digital practices?

With all due respect, did you not at any point stop to think that I may have simply been referring to RAW talent? You know, that God given stuff...

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Indeed. One wonders if we're possibly looking in the wrong place, for the next John Williams, or Jerry Goldsmith.

If you're looking to the realm of video game scorse, you probably are. That's not to say they're unsuccessful, though. I mean they've got huge fanbases. But the sad truth of the matter, is that the vast majority of these 'composers' no longer write their scores, they play and record through a MIDI keyboard, sequencer and sample library - getting orchestrators and conductors to perform via proxy. Which further dilutes the composer's own creative voice, especially if his mock-ups and Finale/Sibelius sheets are undeveloped, resulting in the dozen or so orchestrators making their mark. To make matters worse, most of these aren't trained in composition, harmony, orchestration and counterpoint, meaning they've got about as much musical expertise as your average 10 year piano student.

So that's an entirely different approach and experience from the traditional one that bred us the likes of John Williams and Jerry Goldsmith. Without ever fostering the skill of hearing an entire orchestra and various tone colours in one's head, because they've got the instant reward of the sampled orchestra in front of them. From what I've found, handwritten scores tend to have a unity and meta-structure to them that I've never heard on a track cooked up on Pro Tools + VSL/ES. One tends to self-critique (which can be harmful in excess, take Paul Dukas) and self-analysis more, when one has a piano and that daunting blank manuscript paper in front of you. Whereas a MIDI set-up is an entirely different mentality. Personally, I don't know about you, but I find writing out say a septuplet run on a written score, a hell of a lot less time consuming than any of the possible keyboard short cuts or mouse manoeuvring on Finale. That's one of the reasons why I gave up on notational software, the clumsiness of it all, but also the expensiveness of it. Whereas I can I buy a book of manuscript paper for £7.99.

So for now, unless video game and film composers start realise the cost to creativity their digital approach and lack of training ensues, nothing's going to change.

And as for most film makers needing mockups for every cue, I say screw em. Setup a contract that includes a clause that states 'You shall not require that this composer should produce any mockup.'

I honestly miss the age when film makers trusted composers enough to not demand an ad verbatim digital reconstruction of the entire score, for them to preview. Sure, a lot of hearts get broken, but that's part of the business.

Though if you do want to play along, team up with a Sample Library guro to mockup cues from your score.

Sigh, for the sake of conversation I share a rhetorical musing at the beginning of the thread and you respond with a frankly pointless diatribe in which you lecture me on the pros of traditional compositional technique vs modern digital practices?

With all due respect, did you not at any point stop to think that I may have simply been referring to RAW talent? You know, that God given stuff...

No need to be so dismissive.

It's not pointless, it relates to your musing as to whether or not the next Goldsmtih will come from the world of video game scores. Fair do, so I made a considered argument on why we might not see another Goldsmith or Williams for quite some time.

As for God given talent. Even though Jerry Goldsmith did have that innate predisposition to being a composer, it would have amounted to very little without the musical education he received. And hypothetically, if the instant reward MIDI technology was available in the 50s and early 60s, Jerry Goldsmith had the innate talent for composition (which he clearly did), but no musical knowledge - I think that situation would be comparable with what he have with quite a few film and video game composers today.

What I'm saying is that for greatness, you need both. Likewise, someone with musical imposed in him from a young age, with no natural talent for it, and he feels smothered by it. Knowledge is no substitute for talent, and vice versa. It's careful balancing act, but we should be doing a better job providing at providing the access to that crucial education.

And that post wasn't aimed at you in specific, by any means. It was much more general than that.

Sorry if I've ruined your thread. Next time I'll remember to just post Youtube links to good video game scores and be done with it. :mrgreen:

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No need to be sarcastic :mrgreen:

I apologise if my straight response offended you, it's just that rather obtuse philosophies coming from 'the trained' can get a bit tiresome. Other threads have debated that stuff for years. For the record I largely agree with your opinion on traditional vs digital, but that is besides the point - when all is said and done talent will produce greatness regardless of methods. If you disagree with that fundamental argument then hey ho, fair enough.

If anything, I'd say it could be argued that your point of view on that particular subject displays a lack of imagination, which, it could argued, may be translated into one's output, musically.

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Please, you are from Texas. You should be tougher then that.

MOH is indeed MEH!

I think you're a dickhead for posting this.

Indeed.

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