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Bruce hasn't figured out yet that most people here do not jive with his "sense of humor" at all

The phrase "how could you not know that" is a level of insufferable nerd talk that's on par with "how could you have not seen that?!"

Yeah, it's just Jay and Bruce and Shark talking about things that have nothing to do with anything.

And the series is continuing with The Stripper and SPYS on May 11th!

 

goldsmith3.JPG

 

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Goldsmith at 20th: Vol. III (2-CDs)

Music by Jerry Goldsmith

Limited Edition of 2000 units

May 11th, 2011

 

https://www.facebook.com/lalalandrecords/posts/10159879387728755

 

 

The Stripper is a 1963 score that never had an OST album, that FSM initially released the film recordings for in 1999, paired with the score to "Nick Quarry".  That is long OOP and another label has ever re-tackled it until now.

 

 

S*P*Y*S  is a 1974 score that also never had an OST album, and has never had an full release of any kind before.  The only time music of it has been released on CD is the 2004 Varese 6CD box set "Jerry Goldsmith at 20th Century Fox", which released 19 minutes of it over 9 tracks

 

1.     Main Title (03:03)
2.     Anybody Got A Key? (02:50)
3.     The Mannequin (01:45)
4.     New Friends (01:40)
5.     Who's Paying? (01:04)
6.     Dog-Gone Par's (01:58)
7.     Tools Of The Trade (01:21)
8.     The Buy (02:53)
9.     End Title (02:24)
TRACKS 1-9: S*P*Y*S (1974) total time 18'58''

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3 minutes ago, Jay said:

And the series is continuing with The Stripper and SPYS on May 11th!

 

goldsmith3.JPG

 

 

https://www.facebook.com/lalalandrecords/posts/10159879387728755

 

 

Can a Goldsmith expert here breakdown what the prior release of The Stripper and SPYS were and what a new edition of them could offer?

Expert no. But from what I recall... SPYS only appeared on the Goldsmith at Fox 6CD set and I think it’s a suite of only about 20 minutes of music so this should be quite a bit more. The Stripper came out on FSM but I assume the sound will be considerably improved. I’m in. And X-Men. 

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With the Varese SPYS just shy of 19 minutes and the FSM The Stripper under 45 minutes, both programs fit on one CD with plenty of room to spare. That must mean for this to be a 2-CD set there will be a lot of surprise extra material. The Academy's Herrick library lists all the written cues for S*P*Y*S if you're interested, Jay:
https://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=126278&forumID=1&archive=0

 

It's notable that when FSM originally premiered The Stripper, they did not say it was the complete score -- but they DID make sure to say that its companion on disc, Nick Quarry, was complete:
https://www.filmscoremonthly.com/cds/detail.cfm/cdID/79/

 

Same was the case with another Goldsmith twofer pairing a theatrical feature score with a short TV project: Room 222 was described as being everything Goldsmith recorded for the series, while Ace Eli was conspicuously not described as "complete", as FSM descriptions often made a point of doing:
https://www.filmscoremonthly.com/cds/detail.cfm/cdID/191/

 

I would imagine Ace Eli will also be expanded in this series in the future.

 

MV also posted this in the big LLL thread at FSM:

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SPYS and STRIPPER are remastered and expanded...also includes Jerry's one FLAMING STAR track

 

The latter is great news as it's a wonderful and powerful finale cue "Pacer's Farewell" for a dark Elvis Presley western from 1960. Shades of The Blue Max in it! I wish Jerry had composed the entire score (not that it doesn't have other solid work by fine composers) as his cue is easily the strongest one, and he was assigned the finale for a reason. This was previously only available on a Twilight Time Blu-ray isolated score track, so it's wonderful that it's coming to CD now in this series.

 

Yavar

 

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Neil Bulk just reminded me that the FSM edition of The Stripper also includes a lot of source music, bringing the time for it on that album to over an hour. (I just didn’t import the source music to my iTunes.) So a 2 CD set makes perfect sense with SPYS being expanded.

 

Yavar

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Anybody else disappointed with the sound quality of the new release of The Blue Max? People were raving about the improved sound quality, but to my ears it still sounds rather bad for its time.

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14 hours ago, Jurassic Shark said:

Anybody else disappointed with the sound quality of the new release of The Blue Max? People were raving about the improved sound quality, but to my ears it still sounds rather bad for its time.


Maybe it’s just relative to how it sounded before. To me the LLL 2 disc edition was a noticeable leap forward and is my preferred album for the score. I admit I haven’t heard their newer edition paired with Von Ryan’s Express.

 

Yavar

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12 hours ago, bruce marshall said:

Slightly OT:

Yavar, how do you rate the Sonics on the three versions of ON HARMS WAY?

 

The sonics on the most recent Intrada edition (a slight expansion -- with one great new 90 second score cue and a couple previously unreleased source cues -- from earlier generation sources set aside for the original album master but ultimately unused on the original album) are by far the best on any edition of this score.

 

Yavar

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On 5/1/2021 at 10:46 AM, Ollie said:

I have the FSM release of The Stripper but I never warmed up to SPYS on the box set.

 

Try removing the opening and closing tracks (the cheesiest ones, with the synths and the "SPIIIIIIES") and see if you like the remaining 15 minute suite.

 

Yavar

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GOLDSMITH AT 20th VOL. 3 – THE STRIPPER / S*P*Y*S:
LIMITED EDITION LLLCD 1557
Music by Jerry Goldsmith
Limited Edition of 2000 Units
RETAIL PRICE: $24.98

STARTS SHIPPING MAY 11

 

Order yours starting MAY 11 at 12 noon (pst) at www.lalalandrecords.com


La-La Land Records and 20th Century Studios proudly present a new collection of classic Jerry Goldsmith scores for film and television composed for 20th Century Fox: GOLDSMITH AT 20th. Bringing back out-of-print favorites while also debuting previously unreleased music, this collection will feature new authoritative liner notes and unified packaging sure to please avid collectors but also serve as a perfect gateway for listeners experiencing this music for the first time.

 

Volume 3 showcases two more of the composer’s original feature film scores, one from the ’60s – 1963’s drama, THE STRIPPER, starring Joanne Woodward (in the first of Goldsmith’s collaborations with director Franklin J. Schaffner), and one from the ’70s – 1974’s espionage comedy, S*P*Y*S, starring Elliot Gould and Donald Sutherland, and directed by Irvin Kershner. From the jazz-influenced drama of THE STRIPPER to the broad and lively comic antics and action of S*P*Y*S, these two dynamic Goldsmith scores demonstrate the composer’s unique and boundless talents across two decades. This collection’s presentation of S*P*Y*S (previously available in truncated form only in a long out-of-print box set) is expanded with never-before-released material. Also making its debut on this collection, is the bonus track premiere release of “Pacer’s Farewell” from the 1960 western, FLAMING STAR, starring Elvis Presley. This marked Goldsmith’s very first work for the studio.

 

Both previously out-of-print scores return here with all-new art design by Jim Titus and new in-depth liner notes by writer Jeff Bond. The reissue is produced by Mike Matessino and Neil S. Bulk, mastered by Matessino and is limited to 2000 units.

 

Look for more “GOLDSMITH AT 20th” releases coming soon from La-La Land Records!

 

Also Available from La-La Land Records: GOLDSMITH AT 20th Vol 1 – VON RYAN’S EXPRESS / THE BLUE MAX and GOLDSMITH AT 20th Vol 2 – THE DETECTIVE / THE FLIM FLAM MAN

 

TRACK LISTING:

Disc 1
THE STRIPPER

Score Presentation
1 The Stripper Main Title 2:28
2 The Execution 2:26
3 Sunday Dinner 2:10
4 The Empty Room 1:49
5 Lila And Helen 3:42
6 Party Boy 3:25
7 A Mother’s Worry 2:16
8 Job Hunting 1:21
9 The Classroom 2:35
10 The Dancing Lesson 2:32
11 The Birthday Present 2:05
12 Lila’s Confession 1:19
13 The New Job 2:44
14 Comfort For Lila 1:54
15 A Change Of Heart 3:13
16 Lila’s Advice 4:04
17 The Stripper End Title 1:32

 

1963 Movie Radio
18 Give Me The Simple Life 2:22
19 Twistin’ Baby 1:48
20 Rock And Roll Blues 1:36
21 Anabel Blues 1:13
22 Gas Station Source (Unused) 1:00
23 Should I? 1:29
24 Stripper Blues :52
25 Dixieland Source (Unused) 1:06
26 Rock And Roll Retch 1:43
27 Romance 1:31

 

The Strip Act
28 Something’s Gotta Give 1:53
29 You’ve Gotta See Mama Every Night 1:19
30 Frankie And Johnny 1:09
31 You’ve Gotta See Mama Every Night (Reprise) :40

 

Additional Music
32 The Empty Room (Alternate) 1:50
33 Should I? / The Dancing Lesson (Film Combo) 3:04
34 Pacer’s Farewell (From Flaming Star) 2:26
Disc 1 Total Time: 69:16

 

Disc 2
S*P*Y*S

1 S*P*Y*S Main Title 3:06
2 Russian Warm-Up 1:21
3 Anybody Got A Key? 2:54
4 The Mannequin 1:47
5 The Siberian Blues :48
6 New Friends 1:43
7 A Welcome Guest 2:20
8 Table Talk 1:51
9 A Little Investigation 1:11
10 Who’s Paying? 1:07
11 Get Rid Of The Dog :53
12 One For The Road :47
13 Woops :35
14 Dog-Gone Paris 2:00
15 Tools Of The Trade 1:24
16 Triple Cross 3:47
17 The Buy 2:55
18 A New Start 2:26
Disc 2 Total Time: 33:21
Total Collection Time: 1:42:37

 

https://secure.campaigner.com/csb/Public/show/4our-2e7peu--un2p5-ag4f6q8

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I picked Vol 3 up with X-Men. Haven't heard a bit of either of these scores, I'm excited to explore them. 

 

I bought Vol 2 months back and really enjoyed both scores, both were really a lot of fun. Strange, I know, that I haven't purchased Vol 1 yet, but I will be getting it along with a future release. 

 

I think this is a cool idea for a series. I wonder what other [Composer] at [Studio] lines could be invented in the future. 

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On 5/11/2021 at 3:25 PM, Yavar Moradi said:

15 more minutes for S*P*Y*S, almost doubling the length of the Goldsmith at Fox box suite.
Hell yes. This is going to be fun.

 

UPDATE: It is tons of fun! The score is so much more fleshed out now; it feels like a *score* instead of a jumbled grab-bag suite (still fun, admittedly) on the Varese box. There is a lot more development of the silly meandery main theme...but much more importantly, that fun RUSSIAN theme is all through this! On the Varese it was really only in two cues: "The Buy" near the end, and near the beginning my favorite cue in the score, "Anybody Got a Key?"

 

But now it runs through the entire score almost as an equal counterpart to the main theme for the hapless Americans. It is introduced in the new second cue, which is actually some solo piano source music played on screen called "Russian Warm-Up". Other favorite versions of it are the ominous choral version near the end of "A Welcome Guest" and, though frustratingly brief, when it actually joins the main theme in a brief bit of counterpoint in "Woops". Another important addition is "Triple Cross", an almost four-minute musical sequence (perhaps the best and most deft in terms of actually supporting the film), which mixes a semi-source church organ with bits of fun thematic score punctuations as shenanigans occur during a wedding ceremony.

Anyway, I realize I might be in the minority of people who love this weird and zany score, and I understand why, to an extent: the opening and closing (and once in the body of the score) theme music with the choir going "SPIIIIESSSS" and that dated 70s synth is indeed really dated, silly and cheesy. But it also fits the bumbling main characters in a way. If those three cues were cut out of the score I think this score would have a lot more fans. Thankfully they feel much more outnumbered by other cues this time in complete form, whereas before those three parts made up what seemed like practically half of the Varese 19 minute suite.

 

Oh, and The Stripper is improved... I was happy to revisit this score as I haven't listened to it in years and it's better than I remembered. Seeing the film recently on YouTube also increased my appreciation for what Jerry was doing with this fine dramatic score.

 

Finally, "Pacer's Farewell", Goldsmith's contribution to the 1960 Elvis Presley dramatic western Flaming Star, also contained a big surprise! I had had a copy of the cue running 2:14 ripped from the Twilight Time Blu-ray isolated score track for years. It turns out that film version had a revised shorter ending! Jerry's original version of the cue played out for an additional 20 seconds or so, which are premiering here. Big surprise as I said, and a pleasant one. It's a superb cue -- the first half is all Jerry, with hints of other dramatic scores like Studs Lonigan (the finale) and The Blue Max. In the second half he starts out by adapting a family theme from earlier in the score by Cyril Mockridge (this I had not realized until I read the liner notes), before ultimately adapting the film's title song melody in such a dark and dramatically powerful way that back when we covered the cue on The Goldsmith Odyssey (episode 16) none of us even recognized it despite us discussing the song itself and one earlier cue in the score that adapted its melody. Goldsmith just makes the melody so much his own in this finale cue that it's hard to tell it's the same melody, and it's a brilliant and powerful finish to the score (I only wish he could have been hired for the whole thing, though it's not as if the other composers did a bad job).

 

Anyhow, we recorded a Soundtrack Spotlight episode on this Volume 3 from LLL so stay tuned for that as Jens is deep into editing it.

 

Yavar

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Listedned to The Stripper score proper and it's a really nice score. There are some very beautiful moments, such as Lila's Advice. I'm really enjoying the 1963 Movie Radio tracks, I'm currently listening to. 

 

I didn't pay attention when I purchased this, so I didn't know there was the one cue from Flaming Star. Interested to get to that in a bit. 

 

 

@Yavar Moradi I see what you mean about Pacer's Farewell, that is a great cue. Really cool that this was included as a bonus. 

 

I love the low flute throughout the first half (alto flute?) and English horn at the end, and the dramatic crescendo to pounding timpani. 

 

So then is the only place to hear the Film Version of this cue the blu-ray then?

 

What reasons are there for Flaming Star to have score composed by a few different composers?

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Agreed it’s an awesome bonus; kudos to LLL for going to the trouble to include it! You can hear the shorter film ending of the cue (from the Twilight Time Blu-ray isolated score track) here early on in our Episode 16 podcast from a couple years ago:

https://goldsmithodyssey.buzzsprout.com/159614/927433-episode-16-have-gun-will-travel-flaming-star-1960
 

It’s lossy podcast audio and if you want it in full lossless that Blu-ray is the only way to get it. I understand why LLL just put the longer original version on their Vol. 3 set though, especially if Jerry wasn’t involved in the redone coda as the notes seem to indicate.

 

As for why so many composers were involved in writing a patchwork score for this, I have no idea and there appears to be little documentation as to why. This was in the brief period just after Alfred Newman’s departure at the end of the 50s, and I imagine music assignments at the studio may have been a bit chaotic at the time. This kind of multi-composer project was more common at other studios such as Universal in the 30s-50s, with composers like Henry Mancini, Herman Stein, Irving Gertz, Hans Salter, and countless others providing original scores to westerns, sci-fi flicks, etc. all often without any screen credit because none of them composed over 50% of the score on their own. Fox usually didn’t do this because they had Alfred Newman (a composer himself and great champion of other composers) as executive in charge of music. (MGM had another composer, Johnny Green, in charge.) But when he left I guess there was nothing stopping a score from being farmed out to several composers to have a quicker post production turnaround or whatever. 🤷‍♂️ 

 

Yavar

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Here's more detailed info about how the score was divvied up, which Mike Mattesino (who put the full isolated score track together for Twilight Time almost seven(!!) years ago now) posted at FSM in 2014:
 

Quote

 

It's mostly Cyril Mockridge and Irving Gertz (no Lyn Murray), with three cues by Arthur Morton, one by Harline and one by Goldsmith (it's a 1 min. cue called "Pacer's Farewell" near the end of the movie). Song is by Sherman Edwards and another source song is by Sid Tepper.

https://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=106527&forumID=1&archive=0

 

I for one would happily buy an album of the full score by the other composers, because they did fine work too even if Goldsmith's dramatic finale is the standout cue. Obviously he was incorrect about Goldsmith's cue being only 1 minute long, but I think it was because a little over a minute into the cue, Jerry referenced the score's "family theme" established by Cyril Mockridge and after that the final minute or so of the cue is a really dark (almost unrecognizable...so much so that we didn't even realize it at the time we recorded our Episode 16 podcast) adaptation of the film's title song "Flaming Star":

 

Jerry really makes the melody his own of course, but it would explain why he only got credited for just over a minute on the cue sheet. Here's what the notes have to say:

 

 

E07B42C6-23A6-46C1-9BBE-CBA480D49045.jpeg

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S*P*Y*S is indeed a zany ride. 

 

Very fun. Highlights for me were that I like very much the Russian theme, I like it's piano version in Russian Warm-Up. The Buy is a fun ride. 

 

The goofy synths and 'Spies!' chanting is indeed a little silly, but that stuff doesn't bother me, I enjoy it for what it is. I love how "70s" things sound when the drumset kicks in in the last minute of A New Start

 

The various quotes throughout the score are fun too, Beethoven's 5th kept showing up, and I LOL'd when I heard Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake show up on synth in Anybody Got a Key?, which was also a fun cue. 

 

 

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22 hours ago, MrJosh said:

S*P*Y*S is indeed a zany ride. 

 

Very fun. Highlights for me were that I like very much the Russian theme, I like it's piano version in Russian Warm-Up. The Buy is a fun ride. 

The various quotes throughout the score are fun too, Beethoven's 5th kept showing up, and I LOL'd when I heard Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake show up on synth in Anybody Got a Key?, which was also a fun cue. 

 

Oh yeah, the Russian theme and all its new variations is 100% my favorite thing about this score and the significant expansion.

 

I actually popped in here to share the film The Stripper which is pretty decent (despite being taken away from Franklin Schaffner and recut and retitled against his wishes) and on is on YouTube for free:

 

 

Yavar

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Oh shit, I mixed things up and wasn't aware of the fact that The Stripper has been the first Schaffner-Goldsmith-collaboration. Now we have all 7 collaborations in complete form and pristine sound quality! My interest for that score just increased.

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6 hours ago, Brundlefly said:

Oh shit, I mixed things up and wasn't aware of the fact that The Stripper has been the first Schaffner-Goldsmith-collaboration. Now we have all 7 collaborations in complete form and pristine sound quality! My interest for that score just increased.

 

How did you mix things up?

 

Technically speaking, I guess it is a bit more complicated. The first Schaffner-Goldsmith collaboration was, I'm fairly certain, an episode of the live TV program Playhouse 90 in the 50s. On that show in particular, Goldsmith met a number of directors he later collaborated with on feature films (being live TV means the communication between composer and director would be even closer than on a feature film), including Franklin J. Schaffner, John Frankenheimer, Buzz Kulik, and Boris Sagal (I guess Masada is technically a miniseries).

 

As for The Stripper, while it was the first film of Schaffner's that Goldsmith scored, I'm not sure that they actually "collaborated" on it. The liner notes indicate that Jerry saw Schaffner's original cut of the film (centered primarily on Woodward's performance) and declared it to be "wonderful" -- it seems likely that they planned to collaborate, anyway. But during a period of studio turmoil (the debacle of Cleopatra as well as multiple people passing away), the film was essentially taken away from Schaffner, recut, and re-titled. (The Stripper is basically more of a marketing title; the film isn't about stripping at all really.) It was this cut that Jerry apparently scored, and I don't think he really had further interaction with Schaffner during that process as he'd moved onto other things. If he wrote anything for Schaffner's original cut I don't think it was recorded.

 

So their first collaboration was almost certainly on a Playhouse 90 (probably "The Rank and File" which aired May 28, 1959, though it's possible there's an earlier one...records and existence of these is spotty after all these years). The first Schaffner film Jerry scored was The Stripper. But their first actual collaboration on a feature film was, I'm fairly certain, Planet of the Apes.

 

It is pretty remarkable that new editions of The Stripper (first Schaffner film scored by Goldsmith) and Lionheart (final Schaffner film scored by Goldsmith) were announced within a day of each other! And yeah, I'm pretty sure this does "close the book" on Goldsmith-Schaffner features in complete form, although technically speaking Lionheart is missing one short (half a minute) percussion cue called "Saracen Ride" which was likely recorded at a later pickup session since it wasn't orchestral. I very much doubt that cue will ever be found. (Maybe some day it can be included on a new recording of the score, since it does survive in written form and in the film itself.) And I wouldn't say that the two new cues supplied by Doug Fake are in "pristine sound quality" like the rest of the score. They don't sound bad, but they definitely don't sound as good as the rest, because they were taken from a reference dupe tape, not anything planned to be used for a master. (They sure sound a hell of a lot better than the Rambo: First Blood Part II end credits though -- all Intrada had to use for that awesome piece was a literal audio cassette, as I understand it!)

 

Curious to hear your thoughts on the Soundtrack Spotlight episode after you have a chance to listen.

 

Yavar

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11 minutes ago, Yavar Moradi said:

It is pretty remarkable that new editions of The Stripper (first Schaffner film scored by Goldsmith) and Lionheart (final Schaffner film scored by Goldsmith) were announced within a day of each other! And yeah, I'm pretty sure this does "close the book" on Goldsmith-Schaffner features in complete form, although technically speaking Lionheart is missing one short (half a minute) percussion cue called "Saracen Ride" which was likely recorded at a later pickup session since it wasn't orchestral. I very much doubt that cue will ever be found. (Maybe some day it can be included on a new recording of the score, since it does survive in written form and in the film itself.)

It sounds like Lionheart is really a score that the book can only really be closed on, when it gets a re-recording. I have the same feeling about Inchon for different reasons. Intrada has re-released that one an endless number of times and it still doesn't feel final. The score would be very high on my personal list, if it were given a good sounding re-recording.

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I just listened to the new 2021 edition of Inchon this week and thought it sounded great!  And the new 2021 program is easily the best way to experience it.

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Yes but Brundlefly is saying that both Inchon and Lionheart are great compositions that could be more recognized as such if they were performed and recorded better (which would mean re-recording), which I think is fairly clear and reasonable to say. That can still be true even if the new editions of Inchon and Lionheart sound better than any previous editions. Jerry's music itself would still shine much more in a new recording. (That said I would want actual lost scores such as Black Patch or Pursuit to be prioritized for new recordings, personally, since otherwise we don't have them on album at all!)

 

Yavar

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1 minute ago, Jay said:

I just listened to the new 2021 edition of Inchon this week and thought it sounded great!  And the new 2021 program is easily the best way to experience it.

Maybe the term "great" applies for the remaster if you take the circumstances of the recording into consideration. To be honest, I think that some tracks from the 2020 version sound slightly less good than those on the 2006/2013 version. And there are also a few clipping noises that weren't on the older releases.

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5 minutes ago, Jay said:

I know - I'm saying I don't find anything bad about the Inchon performance or recording ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

 

While it's certainly listenable and enjoyable to me, I think it was pretty noticeably recorded under less than ideal circumstances. But if it sounds completely normal to you vs. other Goldsmith recordings of the era, lucky you! When comparing with Star Trek: The Motion Picture recorded just one year before, the difference is pretty stark IMO.

 

This is the first I've heard from someone who thinks the 2006/2013 version sounds better than the 2020 version, @Brundlefly. I don't notice any clipping but then I don't have fancy listening equipment.

 

Yavar

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