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Jilal

The Official Strictly Non-Williams Favourite Short Musical Moments Thread™

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Posting this here because it's a Bernstein composition, even if Williams is conducting.

 

Bernstein by Boston is one of my favorite John Williams & The Boston Pops albums and of course the performance of Bernstein's On the Town suite is a highlight.

 

The short moment I want to spotlight is the absolutely wonderful clarinet section from 2:46 - 3:00.  This entire track is delightful and you should listen to it!

 

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On 9/3/2015 at 7:40 PM, Nick Tatopoulos's Beret said:

By far the TOS fanfare in The Barrier by Jerry Goldsmith.

 

Indeed, self. I thought of this thread (and another which has vanished) when I was obsessively listening to this part over and over again today. Then I realized I'd already declared this my favorite non-Williams short musical moment. Let me also say that the entire piece and score is great and very likely my favorite Goldsmith and Trek score.

 

 

1:53

 

It truly is one of the greatest moments ever. It's the very essence of Star Trek, Jerry Goldsmith, film scores, music and indeed life itself. It's better than everything.

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14 minutes ago, Nick Tatopoulos's Beret said:

 

Indeed, self. I thought of this thread (and another which has vanished)

 

What thread?

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This beautifully scored bit from Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms (13:21 - 13:41):

 

 

The whole thing is a masterpiece but the instrumental prelude to that "Alleluia" I find particularly moving. The sung words appear previously at 9:30 followed by a haunting "Laudate Dominum" passage, which returns at 19:22 after the same "Alleluia" phrase, but without the timpani.

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This classic excerpt from "Henry V", music by William Walton (1:12:09 - 1:13:33):

 

 

Starting from 1:12:22, we hear a march-like melody in the trombone, which is echo-ed/layered on top by the trumpets, suggesting a vast setting and giving a sense of multiplicity. However, at 1:12:43, the same melody is raised in pitch, and doubled in tempo. Then, at 1:13:00, the melody is raised in pitch and doubled in tempo again. By 1:13:14, the characteristic 'turn' at the end of the melody is virtually transformed into an orchestral effect in the high registers, like the whistling of the wind. But note that, whilst all of this happens, the tempo of the cue itself doesn't change, always staying constant. So, while the audience is watching the French speeding up, bit by bit, before charging towards the other side, there is still a kind of sense of militaristic order present. Combining that sense of order with the image of an army racing towards battle, infuses this scene with an intense sense of terror IMO.

 

Another thing to point out is that, because of how Walton layers the same melody on top of itself to achieve that "echo" effect (canonization), when the melody is sped up, it results in the echo being shortened, almost like a wall moving closer and closer towards the listener... Overall, this is a wonderful example of the use of diminution (quickening) of a melodic line to achieve a musical climax.

 

It's interesting to compare this with Prokofiev's "The Battle on the Ice" from Alexander Nevsky, which also utilizes the "DUN dun DUN dun DUN dun..." ostinato. In that case, the tempo of the cue itself increases bit by bit throughout, before dramatically increasing just before the first impact, almost like a rush of adrenalin. But in Henry V, it's constant all the way, which creates a different but equally chilling effect.

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The Magnificent Seven reference from 1:12-1:15, and the following theme swell we get from 1:16 - 1:41. One of the greatest examples I can think of of an extreme discrepancy between film and music quality.  Seriously underrated score. 
 

 

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21 hours ago, Cerebral Cortex said:

The Magnificent Seven reference from 1:12-1:15, and the following theme swell we get from 1:16 - 1:41. One of the greatest examples I can think of of an extreme discrepancy between film and music quality.  Seriously underrated score. 
 

 

 

Yes!  Both City Slickers scores are terrific and severely underrated.  I'd buy a specialty label expansion of each in a heartbeat.

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On 17/09/2016 at 1:43 AM, TheWhiteRider said:

2:26 - 2:48

 

When I opened this in Spotify to listen ("video unavailable"...) I thought I remembered "1:26 - 1:48", so I listened to it and thought, "Wow, this is lovely!". Of course, I then saw that you were referring to a completely different section...Puccini wrote some really glorious melodies! :D

 

 

My short moment:

 

 

4:58 - 5:25

 

The next track on the album (Medjai Commanders) starts with the same theme, but I adore the transition at 5:06 in this version.

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On 19-9-2016 at 7:55 PM, loert said:

 

When I opened this in Spotify to listen ("video unavailable"...) I thought I remembered "1:26 - 1:48", so I listened to it and thought, "Wow, this is lovely!". Of course, I then saw that you were referring to a completely different section...Puccini wrote some really glorious melodies! :D

 

 

My short moment:

 

 

4:58 - 5:25

 

The next track on the album (Medjai Commanders) starts with the same theme, but I adore the transition at 5:06 in this version.

 

Silvestri's trademark VI -> VII never gets old. It's a bit everywhere, though. :lol:

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5 hours ago, TheWhiteRider said:

Terrible score from a hack rock musician.  Hans should leave serious music to the people who don't need to work with orchestrators.

 

You dont know what the fuck you are talking about!

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Discussion of his JPIII score yesterday inspired me to listen to my old Don Davis favorite, The Matrix, on my drive home last night.

 

A moment that still thrills me is this few seconds near the end of "Hotel Ambush" when the rising, repeating figure builds one tuba/trombone/deep brass instrument on top of the other.  The aural sensation of the layering of these booming brass instruments is just so great.

 

(4:48-4:58)

 

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1 hour ago, Prerecorded Briefing said:

One of his best moments!  Was it even used in the film?

 

Doubt it. Like most of the score, the best parts hardly made it to the film.

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Love this!

 

(Actually, the whole cue is pretty great, but this moment in particular was awesome)

 

 

Too bad the cue didn't end in a massive heroic fanfare, but still a great moment. 

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3 hours ago, Will said:

Love this!

 

(Actually, the whole cue is pretty great, but this moment in particular was awesome)

 

 

Too bad the cue didn't end in a massive heroic fanfare, but still a great moment. 

 

Love that too. Perfect scoring for X-Wings. Reminds me of The Battle of Endor and The Bombing Run.

 

And on to something completely different, one great non-Williams bit that always comes to mind is this

 

 

and on that note this, when the main theme finally returns here

 

 

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I heard this yesterday and it made me an instant Haab fan, despite never really hearing his work before:

 

Here to end of the cue:

 

 

Wow. Particularly starting at 16:22, he manages to take many of the things I love most about Williams and mix them up to make something truly heartwarming and exciting. 

 

Jilal recommended this one to me:

 

 

So great too. Particularly the build-up at 3:50. I'll definitely have to listen to this whole score at some point. 

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