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karelm

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  1. Like
    karelm reacted to tannhauser in Film music theory & 'tricks' resource? (for the composers of the forum)   
    Traditional film music composition techniques are to be found in the whole history of "classical" music so to speak. Study Beethoven, Brahms, Wagner, Strauss, Elgar, Shostakovich, Prokofiev, Stravinsky, rimsky korsakov, korngold, Herman, Williams, to name but a few. It's a natural progression.
  2. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Sibelius6 in John Williams Conducts the Baltimore Symphony June 4!   
    Hello,
    I spent the past week in Baltimore talking to the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra who had just played the John Williams concert. I had the opportunity to talk to various members of the orchestra about their experience not realizing that for most of them, this was the first time they’d ever played under JW.
    Members of the orchestra said at first they were surprised by how wonderful an experience it was. There were so many nuances and small touches in his phrasing that truly differentiating the experience of working with Williams from playing the same music under someone else. They found the music just came alive with an unexpected authenticity. This might seem obvious to us, but they were in awe.
    I got so much joy from hearing these comments from usually stoic professional musicians, I thought I’d share some comments from the performers:
    “It was incredible! I just had to keep pinching myself.”
    “The audience went NUTS!! It was a wall of thunderous applause we rarely heard before.”
    “When the strings played the first classic Williams melody of the night, I just turned into a giant goosebump. What I liked most is how he conducts his music with the pacing and musicality of a great conductor doing Brahms or Tchaikovsky -- perfect pacing and rubato, quick pace when called for, room for the solos to breathe. Just really cool. And of course, a whole Williams concert is really a challenge to play for bass trombone (a million high G's, a few A's and Ab's, Bb's, then low stuff). It really solidified my feeling that he'll be remembered not just as a great film composer but America's greatest composer, period, for decades to come.”
    “He was tremendously gracious and waited without complaint for any of us who wanted to have our picture taken with him.”
    “Sometimes someone would sneak backstage and ask for an autograph and he obliged with a smile and grace as long as schedule permitted.”
    ...One more story I just remembered...when it came time to rehearse Star Wars, JW said "You all know how it goes, lets skip it." The orchestra did not rehearse it at all. They played it straight through at the concert and it sounded perfect. This shows the skill level of pro orchestra and the unique composer/conductor/performer bond when you are dealing and communicating with the top level pros.
  3. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Smeltington in John Williams Conducts the Baltimore Symphony June 4!   
    Hello,
    I spent the past week in Baltimore talking to the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra who had just played the John Williams concert. I had the opportunity to talk to various members of the orchestra about their experience not realizing that for most of them, this was the first time they’d ever played under JW.
    Members of the orchestra said at first they were surprised by how wonderful an experience it was. There were so many nuances and small touches in his phrasing that truly differentiating the experience of working with Williams from playing the same music under someone else. They found the music just came alive with an unexpected authenticity. This might seem obvious to us, but they were in awe.
    I got so much joy from hearing these comments from usually stoic professional musicians, I thought I’d share some comments from the performers:
    “It was incredible! I just had to keep pinching myself.”
    “The audience went NUTS!! It was a wall of thunderous applause we rarely heard before.”
    “When the strings played the first classic Williams melody of the night, I just turned into a giant goosebump. What I liked most is how he conducts his music with the pacing and musicality of a great conductor doing Brahms or Tchaikovsky -- perfect pacing and rubato, quick pace when called for, room for the solos to breathe. Just really cool. And of course, a whole Williams concert is really a challenge to play for bass trombone (a million high G's, a few A's and Ab's, Bb's, then low stuff). It really solidified my feeling that he'll be remembered not just as a great film composer but America's greatest composer, period, for decades to come.”
    “He was tremendously gracious and waited without complaint for any of us who wanted to have our picture taken with him.”
    “Sometimes someone would sneak backstage and ask for an autograph and he obliged with a smile and grace as long as schedule permitted.”
    ...One more story I just remembered...when it came time to rehearse Star Wars, JW said "You all know how it goes, lets skip it." The orchestra did not rehearse it at all. They played it straight through at the concert and it sounded perfect. This shows the skill level of pro orchestra and the unique composer/conductor/performer bond when you are dealing and communicating with the top level pros.
  4. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Incanus in John Williams Conducts the Baltimore Symphony June 4!   
    Hello,
    I spent the past week in Baltimore talking to the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra who had just played the John Williams concert. I had the opportunity to talk to various members of the orchestra about their experience not realizing that for most of them, this was the first time they’d ever played under JW.
    Members of the orchestra said at first they were surprised by how wonderful an experience it was. There were so many nuances and small touches in his phrasing that truly differentiating the experience of working with Williams from playing the same music under someone else. They found the music just came alive with an unexpected authenticity. This might seem obvious to us, but they were in awe.
    I got so much joy from hearing these comments from usually stoic professional musicians, I thought I’d share some comments from the performers:
    “It was incredible! I just had to keep pinching myself.”
    “The audience went NUTS!! It was a wall of thunderous applause we rarely heard before.”
    “When the strings played the first classic Williams melody of the night, I just turned into a giant goosebump. What I liked most is how he conducts his music with the pacing and musicality of a great conductor doing Brahms or Tchaikovsky -- perfect pacing and rubato, quick pace when called for, room for the solos to breathe. Just really cool. And of course, a whole Williams concert is really a challenge to play for bass trombone (a million high G's, a few A's and Ab's, Bb's, then low stuff). It really solidified my feeling that he'll be remembered not just as a great film composer but America's greatest composer, period, for decades to come.”
    “He was tremendously gracious and waited without complaint for any of us who wanted to have our picture taken with him.”
    “Sometimes someone would sneak backstage and ask for an autograph and he obliged with a smile and grace as long as schedule permitted.”
    ...One more story I just remembered...when it came time to rehearse Star Wars, JW said "You all know how it goes, lets skip it." The orchestra did not rehearse it at all. They played it straight through at the concert and it sounded perfect. This shows the skill level of pro orchestra and the unique composer/conductor/performer bond when you are dealing and communicating with the top level pros.
  5. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Jay in John Williams Conducts the Baltimore Symphony June 4!   
    Hello,
    I spent the past week in Baltimore talking to the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra who had just played the John Williams concert. I had the opportunity to talk to various members of the orchestra about their experience not realizing that for most of them, this was the first time they’d ever played under JW.
    Members of the orchestra said at first they were surprised by how wonderful an experience it was. There were so many nuances and small touches in his phrasing that truly differentiating the experience of working with Williams from playing the same music under someone else. They found the music just came alive with an unexpected authenticity. This might seem obvious to us, but they were in awe.
    I got so much joy from hearing these comments from usually stoic professional musicians, I thought I’d share some comments from the performers:
    “It was incredible! I just had to keep pinching myself.”
    “The audience went NUTS!! It was a wall of thunderous applause we rarely heard before.”
    “When the strings played the first classic Williams melody of the night, I just turned into a giant goosebump. What I liked most is how he conducts his music with the pacing and musicality of a great conductor doing Brahms or Tchaikovsky -- perfect pacing and rubato, quick pace when called for, room for the solos to breathe. Just really cool. And of course, a whole Williams concert is really a challenge to play for bass trombone (a million high G's, a few A's and Ab's, Bb's, then low stuff). It really solidified my feeling that he'll be remembered not just as a great film composer but America's greatest composer, period, for decades to come.”
    “He was tremendously gracious and waited without complaint for any of us who wanted to have our picture taken with him.”
    “Sometimes someone would sneak backstage and ask for an autograph and he obliged with a smile and grace as long as schedule permitted.”
    ...One more story I just remembered...when it came time to rehearse Star Wars, JW said "You all know how it goes, lets skip it." The orchestra did not rehearse it at all. They played it straight through at the concert and it sounded perfect. This shows the skill level of pro orchestra and the unique composer/conductor/performer bond when you are dealing and communicating with the top level pros.
  6. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Sibelius6 in John Williams in San Francisco!!! September 16, 2013   
    I believe these concerts are not a "farewell" tour but rather a gift to the orchestra since these concerts are typically at reduced rates or donated time from the maestro but will sell out. I understand there is a long series of concerts planned for this purpose. Baltimore symphony concert two weeks ago was an example. I'm playing with them now and they were all blown away by JW. I'll right up some of the comments I heard when I return but they are in total awe of the experience.
  7. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Gnome in Plaid in London or Los Angeles for Star Wars VII score? [UPDATE: It's Los Angeles]   
    I just returned from playing with the Baltimore Symphony and was very excited to meet David Cripps - the principal horn of the London Symphony Orchestra from 1970 to 1983. He is THE Princess Leia horn soloist and played on all the original trilogy and Superman plus countless other great recordings from this period. A very charming fellow and we spent much time and wine talking about the original scoring sessions. Some interesting tidbits he mentioned:
    * the original plan was not to use the LSO at all. It was to use London contracted players but since they are not paid a salary but rather service fees, they had a hole in their schedule for two weeks and they complained to then conductor/music director Andre Previn. Andre is friends with JW and suggested the use of LSO to remedy the schedule gap resulting in lost wages to the players when JW spoke to Andre about London contracted musicians. JW liked the ideas and ran it past the Star Wars producers and the rest is history.
    * The first cue they recorded was the End Credits and they all considered it very well written but also exhausting. This served as a good introduction to the various themes. The general consensus was this was just a gig rather than history. They considered history as their recordings with Stravinsky, Claudio Aboddo, Stowkoski, Adrian Boult, William Walton conducting his Viola Concerto (he was drunk at the time and nearly incapacitated), etc. This gentleman had so many interesting stories to tell and each were shocking to me what this man had played such a major part in all of this. I'm trying to get him to write a memoir of his experiences. One funny story was with Leopold Stokowski (then in his late 90's) doing a studio session of a symphony where the entire time he was off by a bar. The end result is, he said the orchestra wasn't following him so they had to re-record the entire symphony due to his mistake.
    * Since the version of Princess Leia's theme is not in the film, after a long day of recording, they were exhausted and JW asked the orchestra if they could just go 30 minutes overtime to do a reading of a version not in the film. JW wrote it specifically for David to play the horn solo. They accepted because the music was slower than a lot of what they had done that day with the end credits, etc. So they just read it once and then recorded it straight through in a single take.
    * He remains personal friends with JW and had nothing to but good things to say about the whole experience with him.
    It was absolutely fascinating to talk to him and he was very kind!
  8. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Sibelius6 in London or Los Angeles for Star Wars VII score? [UPDATE: It's Los Angeles]   
    I just returned from playing with the Baltimore Symphony and was very excited to meet David Cripps - the principal horn of the London Symphony Orchestra from 1970 to 1983. He is THE Princess Leia horn soloist and played on all the original trilogy and Superman plus countless other great recordings from this period. A very charming fellow and we spent much time and wine talking about the original scoring sessions. Some interesting tidbits he mentioned:
    * the original plan was not to use the LSO at all. It was to use London contracted players but since they are not paid a salary but rather service fees, they had a hole in their schedule for two weeks and they complained to then conductor/music director Andre Previn. Andre is friends with JW and suggested the use of LSO to remedy the schedule gap resulting in lost wages to the players when JW spoke to Andre about London contracted musicians. JW liked the ideas and ran it past the Star Wars producers and the rest is history.
    * The first cue they recorded was the End Credits and they all considered it very well written but also exhausting. This served as a good introduction to the various themes. The general consensus was this was just a gig rather than history. They considered history as their recordings with Stravinsky, Claudio Aboddo, Stowkoski, Adrian Boult, William Walton conducting his Viola Concerto (he was drunk at the time and nearly incapacitated), etc. This gentleman had so many interesting stories to tell and each were shocking to me what this man had played such a major part in all of this. I'm trying to get him to write a memoir of his experiences. One funny story was with Leopold Stokowski (then in his late 90's) doing a studio session of a symphony where the entire time he was off by a bar. The end result is, he said the orchestra wasn't following him so they had to re-record the entire symphony due to his mistake.
    * Since the version of Princess Leia's theme is not in the film, after a long day of recording, they were exhausted and JW asked the orchestra if they could just go 30 minutes overtime to do a reading of a version not in the film. JW wrote it specifically for David to play the horn solo. They accepted because the music was slower than a lot of what they had done that day with the end credits, etc. So they just read it once and then recorded it straight through in a single take.
    * He remains personal friends with JW and had nothing to but good things to say about the whole experience with him.
    It was absolutely fascinating to talk to him and he was very kind!
  9. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Smeltington in London or Los Angeles for Star Wars VII score? [UPDATE: It's Los Angeles]   
    I just returned from playing with the Baltimore Symphony and was very excited to meet David Cripps - the principal horn of the London Symphony Orchestra from 1970 to 1983. He is THE Princess Leia horn soloist and played on all the original trilogy and Superman plus countless other great recordings from this period. A very charming fellow and we spent much time and wine talking about the original scoring sessions. Some interesting tidbits he mentioned:
    * the original plan was not to use the LSO at all. It was to use London contracted players but since they are not paid a salary but rather service fees, they had a hole in their schedule for two weeks and they complained to then conductor/music director Andre Previn. Andre is friends with JW and suggested the use of LSO to remedy the schedule gap resulting in lost wages to the players when JW spoke to Andre about London contracted musicians. JW liked the ideas and ran it past the Star Wars producers and the rest is history.
    * The first cue they recorded was the End Credits and they all considered it very well written but also exhausting. This served as a good introduction to the various themes. The general consensus was this was just a gig rather than history. They considered history as their recordings with Stravinsky, Claudio Aboddo, Stowkoski, Adrian Boult, William Walton conducting his Viola Concerto (he was drunk at the time and nearly incapacitated), etc. This gentleman had so many interesting stories to tell and each were shocking to me what this man had played such a major part in all of this. I'm trying to get him to write a memoir of his experiences. One funny story was with Leopold Stokowski (then in his late 90's) doing a studio session of a symphony where the entire time he was off by a bar. The end result is, he said the orchestra wasn't following him so they had to re-record the entire symphony due to his mistake.
    * Since the version of Princess Leia's theme is not in the film, after a long day of recording, they were exhausted and JW asked the orchestra if they could just go 30 minutes overtime to do a reading of a version not in the film. JW wrote it specifically for David to play the horn solo. They accepted because the music was slower than a lot of what they had done that day with the end credits, etc. So they just read it once and then recorded it straight through in a single take.
    * He remains personal friends with JW and had nothing to but good things to say about the whole experience with him.
    It was absolutely fascinating to talk to him and he was very kind!
  10. Like
    karelm reacted to Incanus in New DVD with John Williams conducting   
    This is wonderful news! This year is just so full of JW releases in many forms.
  11. Like
    karelm reacted to Miguel Andrade in Conversations - New Chamber (piano solo) by John Williams   
    Really amazing news. Any new chamber music from Williams is just a wonderful, joyous thing to celebrate
  12. Like
    karelm reacted to TownerFan in Happy 100th to Stravinsky's "Le sacre du printemps"!   
    On May 29, 1913, the world of arts was forever changed when the audience who gathered at the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées in Paris was about to witness the first ever performance of a ballet composed by Igor Stravinsky called Le sacre du printemps (The Rite of Spring). The rest, as they say, is history.
    This seminal piece of music really turned the music world upside down and went on to become one of the most important pieces of music ever written in the 20th century. Nothing was the same after it.
    After 100 years, Stravinsky's Sacre is still a powerful composition, capable of infusing a great deal of excitement and awe to anyone who listen to it. Film composers also took their share of great influence from this piece.
    So, let's celebrate one of the most amazing pieces of music ever conceived by a human being! NPR Classical made some great articles to celebrate the anniversary, go read them here.
    Watch this wonderful visualization made by composer and videoartist Stephen Malinowski:

  13. Like
    karelm reacted to TownerFan in John Williams scoring all three new Star Wars films!!   
    This.
    I too am not surprised at all. Williams cares about his work for the Star Wars series as much as his fans do. He's very grateful for the success, visibility and opportunities it brought to his career, very much like he feels for his association with Steven Spielberg. So, in this sense, it's not surprising he still wants to be part of this world.
    Also, I think John is still a very young soul and, as it appears from the brief quote in this interview, he's very excited to see what new things he can bring to the table. One could think he would feel (legitimately) unmotivated after six films of the same series. But I think his enthusiasm and sense of wonder is absolutely genuine.
    I really hope to get at 81 with just half the energy and vitality he shows!
  14. Like
    karelm reacted to Pieter Boelen in John Williams at the 2013 BMI Film/TV Awards   
    YES! He's a genuine hero and a great man he is!
  15. Like
    karelm reacted to Jay in John Williams at the 2013 BMI Film/TV Awards   
    Super classy and super humble. We could use more guys like him.
  16. Like
    karelm reacted to Quintus in Interstellar (2014 film directed by Christopher Nolan)   
    That's obviously an error - Nolan doesn't care for good music in his films.
  17. Like
    karelm reacted to TownerFan in John Williams scoring all three new Star Wars films!!   
    I don't think we should read too much between the lines on this. As I see it, it's plain and simple, just like it seems: they're waiting for JW to say "yes". And they're confident he will.
    I'm sure you all know how much working relationships are a main thing in Hollywood. Giacchino and Abrams share an exclusive relationship based on mutual respect and admiration and they appears also to be good friends (i.e. it's not just work). They both reached high level of power and success working together, so it's pretty natural for both to speak high of each other in public. They both know how much one owes to the other (in the best sense).
    Now, since Abrams has to work on a franchise with a more than estabilished musical identity (i.e.: it's one of the major things that makes Star Wars what it really is) and the fact its composer is still alive and kicking, I see quite natural they want to give him first option. Well, they MUST give him first option, as I see it. John Williams is Star Wars, as much as Lucas, Ford, Hamill, Fisher, Burtt and all the others who created it are. As I said before, nobody in the world would take the job out of his hands just because the chosen director has an ongoing working relationship with another composer. Also, as much as Abrams is fond of Giacchino and his music, I think he would be more than happy if JW ends up writing music for a film he's directing. For any director, it's like winning the lottery!
  18. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Bryant Burnette in Williams interview on Classical KUSC (April 25th, 2013)   
    Hello,
    I've uploaded the full recordings from KUSC's interview with John Williams and you can download them here:
    https://www.yousendit.com/download/UVJqTmZkdENvQnNpR01UQw
    Unfortunately, I don't have enough server space to store somewhere so if someone is willing to post them because this link will expire in two weeks.
    Enjoy!
  19. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Incanus in Williams interview on Classical KUSC (April 25th, 2013)   
    ...one more thing. Jim said that maestro came in to the studio several times last month to record the broadcast and is in "excellent health".
  20. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Once in Williams interview on Classical KUSC (April 25th, 2013)   
    Just a note, I contacted the radio station and they'll send me the full audio CD by mail. I'll upload it somewhere when I get it so we should all have this soon. Special thanks to Jim Svejda for having a kind heart to a JW fan.
  21. Like
    karelm got a reaction from indy4 in Williams interview on Classical KUSC (April 25th, 2013)   
    ...one more thing. Jim said that maestro came in to the studio several times last month to record the broadcast and is in "excellent health".
  22. Like
    karelm got a reaction from russds in Williams interview on Classical KUSC (April 25th, 2013)   
    Just a note, I contacted the radio station and they'll send me the full audio CD by mail. I'll upload it somewhere when I get it so we should all have this soon. Special thanks to Jim Svejda for having a kind heart to a JW fan.
  23. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Muad'Dib in Williams interview on Classical KUSC (April 25th, 2013)   
    Just a note, I contacted the radio station and they'll send me the full audio CD by mail. I'll upload it somewhere when I get it so we should all have this soon. Special thanks to Jim Svejda for having a kind heart to a JW fan.
  24. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Sibelius6 in Williams interview on Classical KUSC (April 25th, 2013)   
    ...one more thing. Jim said that maestro came in to the studio several times last month to record the broadcast and is in "excellent health".
  25. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Sibelius6 in Williams interview on Classical KUSC (April 25th, 2013)   
    Just a note, I contacted the radio station and they'll send me the full audio CD by mail. I'll upload it somewhere when I get it so we should all have this soon. Special thanks to Jim Svejda for having a kind heart to a JW fan.
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