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Superman: The Movie (1978) vs. Batman (1989)

Superman: The Movie (1978) vs. Batman (1989)  

40 members have voted

  1. 1. Which film do you prefer?

    • Superman: The Movie (directed by Richard Donner)
    • Batman (directed by Tim Burton)
  2. 2. Which score do you prefer?

    • Superman: The Movie (composed by John Williams)
    • Batman (composed by Danny Elfman)


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Not necessarily: I mean, I enjoy most of Marvel's output, for instance.

 

But even if you're going down the lighthearted route, you still need to find a way to make your film register with the audience.

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13 minutes ago, Chen G. said:

 

But even if you're going down the lighthearted route, you still need to find a way to make your film register with the audience.

 

The film was a massive hit with the audience!

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I admire Elfman's score a great deal. But it's no match for Williams. Donner's film is one of the most charming blockbusters ever. Whimsical and magical. Beautifully made too. Burton's film has personality and a lot of style. But no substance to speak of.

 

Karol

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52 minutes ago, Margo Channing said:

Is it a disturbing film?

In far more ways, than one ;)

 

 

 

38 minutes ago, crocodile said:

 Burton's film has personality and a lot of style. But no substance to speak of.

That's because there's no substance in psychopathy. It's all artifice. 

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2 hours ago, Stefancos said:

You don't believe in psychiatry?

 

Good question, Steef.

I have worked with many people with SEMIs (including psychopaths) and, unfortunately and sadly, most of them cannot be "cured" - at least not in the way that modern psychiatry tries to "cure". The best that can be offered is monitoring, and treatment (in whatever form it comes in) to make sure that they are not a danger to either themselves, or others.

It's a sad affair, to be sure, but it appears to be the most stable, and least restrictive route, at this time. Of course, there are those who simply cannot be allowed to live outside of secure environments, and, rest assured, if they were on the "outside", they would be very, very dangerous.

In answer to your question: psychiatry can help, but it can only go so far. Some people, are, I'm sorry to say, beyond medical help.

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6 hours ago, Chen G. said:

there are moments of darkness in the original Star Wars, in Indiana Jones films, etc - not so much, however, in Superman.

 

The destruction of Krypton, Pa Kent's fatal heart attack, Luthor killing Detective Harry with a commuter train?

 

 

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1 hour ago, Sharky said:

 

The destruction of Krypton, Pa Kent's fatal heart attack, Luthor killing Detective Harry with a commuter train?

 

 

 

The whole movie is so lighthearted and tongue-in-cheek, I can't consider these moments "dark". His father and adoptive father die like a few minutes after their introductions, for instance. The music gives the impression that it's supposed to be dramatic, I guess. Or a Cheerios commercial.

 

Is it also "dark" because there's a pimp with some prostitutes when Superman makes his first appearance?

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13 minutes ago, Alexcremers said:

 

Probably the best heart attack scene in a movie ever. 

 

Very emotional, despite Ford being in the film so briefly.

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On 5/16/2018 at 5:17 PM, Stefancos said:

Superman: The Movie for both, without question or hesitation!

 

Indeed.

11 hours ago, Chen G. said:

I said nothing about gritty, but villains should be at least somewhat threatening.

 

Meh.  How "threatening" can a comic book villain really be? What, he'd be more threatening if he could shoot lasers from his eyes, or demolish a building with his fists, or bring lightning down, or any of the other things superhero movie villains can do?  None of that makes the villain "threatening".  It's hard to make an impression as a villain and what matter is how memorable they are. I've seen every MCU movie and off the top of my head the only villains who stand out are Loki and Thanos...and mostly Loki, and not because of how "threatening" he is, but because of how well Hiddlebum nails the character.  Much like Hackman.

 

Hackman as Luthor is one of the greatest movie villains of all time...and the Superman movie is a classic in the genre, if not definitive (though admittedly, dated as well). 

 

 

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12 hours ago, Chen G. said:

 

 

 

First lesson to be learned: never ever make your villain the comic relief!

1

 

This. I enjoy some sections of Donner's Superman film but prefer his cut for Superman 2 better. Reeve, Kidder, and Williams' score help make it fun -- but the first film's villains grind the proceedings to a halt. Hell, Kevin Spacey and Jesse Eisenberg were better versions of Lex than Hackman... it helped that they were actually threatening.

 

In terms of film preference, Batman goes down smoothly. I have problems with it, but at least the villain was somewhat threatening. And Elfman's score just really made it more grand and operatic.

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7 minutes ago, Matt C said:

Hell, Kevin Spacey and Jesse Eisenberg were better versions of Lex than Hackman... it helped that they were actually threatening.

 

LOL.

 

I'd argue this point, but I can't remember a thing about either of their performances.

 

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Until the actual threat of the movie kicks in (I turn off when Superman gets the high frequency message), Superman is a beautiful movie. Light-hearted, good-natured, and purely exhilarating in large part due to John Williams' profoundly and genuinely heroic score, it made me finally proud to share a name with the Man of Steel.

 

Batman was the first date, and then Burton stole home base with Batman Returns.

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48 minutes ago, Margo Channing said:

Anyone else remember a decade ago it was considered "cool" to bag shit on the Burton Batman movies? Now that the nostalgia revolution of the 2010s has kicked in, suddenly everyone has changed their tune and now they love it.

 

The height of the Nolan wave. Especially after The Dark Knight, almost everyone I knew into movies said I was "easy to please" for loving Batman Returns. They said the Burton films were dated, overly cartoony, and completely emtpy.

 

My response? "You flush it, I flaunt it."

40 minutes ago, Bespin said:

ARRGHHHHH

 

 

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1 hour ago, Margo Channing said:

Anyone else remember a decade ago it was considered "cool" to bag shit on the Burton Batman movies? Now that the nostalgia revolution of the 2010s has kicked in, suddenly everyone has changed their tune and now they love it.

 

My allegiance is to Tim Burton, to Michael Keaton!

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56 minutes ago, Nick Parker said:

 

The height of the Nolan wave. Especially after The Dark Knight, almost everyone I knew into movies said I was "easy to please" for loving Batman Returns. They said the Burton films were dated, overly cartoony, and completely emtpy.

 

My response? "You flush it, I flaunt it."

 

 

It was round about that time, probably just after Batman Begins or even Casino Royale came out where I first read the "more realistic and relatable" line being bandied about on IMDb forums and other online discussion places. I didn't invent it, I've seen it said in earnest!

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6 hours ago, Nick1066 said:

 

LOL.

 

I'd argue this point, but I can't remember a thing about either of their performances.

 

 

Clancy Brown is the perfect Lex Luthor --suave, menacing, greasy, and yet completely entertaining. Spacey's Lex was a more ruthless take on Hackman, but it wasn't quite right. I wasn't sold on Eisenberg for most of Batman v. Superman until that rooftop scene... very menacing but eccentric. 

 

But Brown is perfect as Lex IMO.

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Very, very tricky. I love both films and scores dearly. But if someone put a gun to my head -- BATMAN for film, and SUPERMAN for score.

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