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Romão

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  1. Like
    Romão got a reaction from The Illustrious Jerry in What Is The Last Score You Listened To?   
    It's my favorite Barry score. I love how stripped down and unadorned it sounds
  2. Like
    Romão got a reaction from Naïve Old Fart in What Is The Last Score You Listened To?   
    It's my favorite Barry score. I love how stripped down and unadorned it sounds
  3. Like
    Romão reacted to Oomoog the Ecstatic in The Official Strictly Non-Williams Favourite Short Musical Moments Thread™   
    3:06-3:14 gives me tears. Quite possibly the most beautiful thing to mind.
     
     
  4. Like
    Romão got a reaction from mstrox in TWIN PEAKS   
    Fire Walk with Me is brilliant. Incredible score too
  5. Like
    Romão got a reaction from OneBuckFilms in The Official La-La Land Records Thread   
    So Dune might be on their plans. That would be awesome
  6. Haha
    Romão got a reaction from Jurassic Shark in The Official Christopher Nolan Church Thread   
    Seeing Lawrence of Arabia in the theater was the best 3D cinema experience I ever had, and the movie wasn't even in 3D
  7. Like
    Romão got a reaction from Naïve Old Fart in The Official Christopher Nolan Church Thread   
    Seeing Lawrence of Arabia in the theater was the best 3D cinema experience I ever had, and the movie wasn't even in 3D
  8. Like
    Romão reacted to TheUlyssesian in The Official Christopher Nolan Church Thread   
    I'll add this to the conversation something which I said even when I was very young and working with a friend on competing painting projects for a competition. My friend was undoubtedly more skilled but I inevitably placed higher - due to what I attributed to greater imagination and compositional skill.
     
    I think the same is with movies. High quality modern equipment only take you so far. Go 100K if you want rather than 4K and the best VFX money can buy or not, but there is no substitute for framing, for blocking, for knowing where to place the camera and where to put people and things in a frame etc. It is the latter things which make for stunning and memorable images. Which is why so many classic older films have a greater visual impact that modern films shot on 16k or whatever.
     
    Something like Lawrence is spectacular simply because of how it is composed. Modern directors have great cameras and hard drives but rarely a good eye or good imagination.
  9. Thanks
    Romão got a reaction from Gruesome Son of a Bitch in What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)   
    Ghostbusters 2016 was a spectacular failure in every goal it tried to achieve. Complete waste of time and money
  10. Like
    Romão got a reaction from Naïve Old Fart in What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)   
    Ghostbusters 2016 was a spectacular failure in every goal it tried to achieve. Complete waste of time and money
  11. Like
    Romão reacted to crocodile in What Is The Last Score You Listened To?   
    Vertigo (McNeely recording). This is one of my favourite albums of all time. Beautifully played and captured, this recording actually surpasses the original. It's alluring and seductive. The disc doesn't feature the complete score but it's a very well put together selection. You don't really need the remaining material. This is film music perfection.
     
    Karol
  12. Like
    Romão reacted to Datameister in Laugh Out Loud - Unintentionally Funny Movie Moments   
    John Boyega, Daisy Ridley, and Oscar Isaac had some good material to work with in TFA, I thought.
     
    I'm gonna make myself very unpopular here, but this thread makes me think of the LOTR films. I enjoy them, but boy, Jackson's proclivity for slow-mo melodrama never fails to take me out of the experience.
  13. Like
    Romão got a reaction from KK in Has the score to Gladiator aged well?   
    Great selections from The Da Vinci Code, KK and Richard Penna 
     
    Very much so. The other score where he also acomplishes this (although not as sucessfully as in The Da Vinci Code), is Hannibal. And I actually love how Hopkins' narration is blended in some tracks, works wonderfully. Like this, for example:
     
     
  14. Like
    Romão reacted to crocodile in What Is The Last Score You Listened To?   
    Titus. What would I give to hear a score of such imagination and colour in a modern film. It is both refined and unashamedly kitschy.
     
    Karol
  15. Thanks
    Romão reacted to Falstaft in "Approaching the Throne" from Ep. 9 Appreciation   
    I've been meaning to get another thread going for analyzing and appreciating a track from The Rise of Skywalker. So what does everyone think of "Approaching the Throne" (7m20), a true knock-out cue in my opinion.
     
     
    I can get the ball rolling by offering a section-by-section breakdown. It's a stupendously rich piece of music in terms of thematic references and developments -- at least 10 independent motivic components, and I'm probably missing a few important details. Apologies too if this is restating stuff that's already been identified and discussed.
     
    0:00-0:20: Deep, slow procession in D-minor, with a Halting Rhythmic Figure, scurrying strings and growing dissonance. Weirdly, the FYC and film version begins in C-minor, and modulates halfway through to D. Unclear if this is the sign of an alternate version of the cue or another instance of inexplicable pitch-shifting -- maybe because "The Battle of the Resistance" it succeeds ended in C. Also, that Halting Rhythmic Figure appears in an unreleased bit of score of the overall sequence (1:40:46) when Rey first takes the Exegol elevator down: there it's in F-minor -- again, not clear if it's pitch-shifted or a genuinely new variant? 
     
    0:20-0:45: A big swell onto a D-minor chord for the Palpatine Throne, gathering dissonance after its initial "reveal."
     
    0:45-0:58: More highly dissonant, atonal material; dialed-out in the film in favor of Sith chanting.
     
    0:58-1:15: Statement of an Insidious Minor Figure motif in parallel minor thirds (C-B-D-Eb-A) that comes up here and a few other occasions on Exegol. Related to the Psalm of the Sith leitmotif. Followed by a squirmy cousin of of the Sith Wayfinder motif (1:06) and a very brief Psalm of the Sith tag in muted brass (Eb-Gb-F).
     
    1:15-1:30: Harmonically "darkened" version of Rey's Theme under Palpatine's dialogue that gives way to a couple of suspenseful chords.
     
    1:30-2:00: Two rotations through the Psalm of the Sith-derived Canon, first on A-minor, then, because of the imitation at the minor-third, F#-minor. Quite clearly inspired by "Palpatine's Instructions" from ROTS to my ears (and, by extension, Vaughan Williams's 6th symphony). Appropriate, since he's once again literally instructing someone, now Rey on how she needs to kill him. Previewed elsewhere in the score in some interesting ways.
     
    2:00-2:15: Big (and last?) statement of the Sith Wayfinder Motif, overlain with the Insidious Minor Figure. I love this moment.
     
    2:15-2:30: Cut to space-battle, with music that recalls Psalm of the Sith (E-G-F#-A#) in melodic outline but even more-so Tension in rhythm and affect. Cool contrapuntal interplay between higher-strings on this idea and lower instruments continuing with it around 2:23. Naturally, all of this fantastic musical detail is virtually inaudible in the film.
     
    2:32-2:43: Completely new Battle Theme in A-minor, especially notable b/c its close to being "grammatical" in @Ludwig's terms, having a pretty balanced beginning/middle/end structure. If anyone can point to precedents or links between this melody and other parts of the score, I would love to know! (And I bet @BrotherSound too)
     
    2:43-2:46: Little return to the Tension idea from before, transitions to...
     
    2:47-2:54: A key-change to C-min and second, incomplete statement of new Battle Theme from the winds.
     
    2:54-3:11: A great pair of chromatic sequences, first down (Fm - DbM7/F - E - CM7/E - Ebm - CbM7/Eb) then back up from Em to Fm. Some familiar Williamsy wind+xyl stabs in there too.
     
    3:11-3:19: A quite glorious trumpet statement of the TROS Victory Theme in D-major. Replaced in the film by a splice of the 2:32 Battle Theme for...reasons?
     
    3:20-3:25: Two phrases worth of very ANH-flavored pounding dissonant chords, like Bbm/A.
     
    3:25-3:40: Big C-minor statement of the March of the Resistance, one of the best in the series, and possibly its last. A lot of orchestrational details in strings and winds that are hard to pick out on the recording.
     
    3:40-3:54: Some very tense but non-motivic interstitial material, serving to build up to...
     
    3:55-End: "The time has come!" for a huge choral outburst on B-minor chord, intoning some as-yet unidentified text. The closest we get to Duel of the Fates in the Sequel Trilogy.
  16. Like
    Romão reacted to Richard Penna in Has the score to Gladiator aged well?   
    Angels & Demons is also good, although a bit too much generic material for my liking in a few sections such as 'Fire' and 'Immolation'. It does however, have the astounding Science & Religion, which scores a scene that could have gone completely the other way, but doesn't:
     
     
     
    I also enjoy a lot of Interstellar, but it can get a bit repetitive in complete form.
     
    My favourite bit from Da Vinci Code has always been this: (particularly the choral bit from 6:17)
     
     
    I also love the theme from here (ending with the soprano):
     
     
  17. Like
    Romão reacted to KK in Has the score to Gladiator aged well?   
    "Chevaliers de Sangreal" is the obvious popular Zimmer highlight, the "Time" of this film, if you will, but these better represent the more subdued elegance of the score. Outside of maybe The Thin Red Line, it's the closest Zimmer ever got to a liturgical tone poem. Some of his finest writing. Also one of the best examples for Zimmer's ear for colour, which never really gets its due credit.
  18. Like
    Romão got a reaction from serenifly in Bear McCreary's ANIMAL CRACKERS (2020)   
    And Elfman, for sure. 
  19. Like
    Romão got a reaction from The Illustrious Jerry in What Is The Last Score You Listened To?   
    The Final Frontier is my favorite Star Trek score, but I needed the expanded album to fall in love with it
  20. Like
    Romão reacted to Incanus in What Is The Last Score You Listened To?   
    Dracula (Varese Deluxe Edition) by John Williams: I don't listen to the Varese Deluxe edition nearly enough, as every time I do, I am reminded how wonderful this music is and how wonderful this release is. John Williams should really have scored more horror films with such darkly romantic twist as this stuff seems right up his alley. While the OST album did have many of the major setpieces of the score, the Varese Deluxe release adds some connective musical material in to the mix, revealing e.g. a minor motif for Van Helsing for the first time, that never made it to the original album in a recognizable way and revealing a larger architecture of the score presented in its complete and (mostly) chronological form. I can't stop marvelling how Williams kept churning such great scores one after another in that particular time period and this release really showcases why Dracula should stand proud among his amazing 1970's output.
     
    And now onward to take a listen to an equally impressive yet completely different take on the Dracula story:
    Bram Stoker's Dracula (LLL release personal playlist) by Wojciech Kilar
  21. Like
    Romão got a reaction from Incanus in Has the score to Gladiator aged well?   
    The Da Vinci is probably my favorite Zimmer score, but Chevaliers de Sangreal is easily my least favorite track from that score
  22. Like
    Romão got a reaction from KK in Has the score to Gladiator aged well?   
    The Da Vinci is probably my favorite Zimmer score, but Chevaliers de Sangreal is easily my least favorite track from that score
  23. Like
    Romão reacted to Jay in THE RIVER expanded and remastered by Mike Matessino now available from Intrada Records   
    It's been raining this afternoon, and I got the urge to put this score on and boy does it hit the spot.

    The old OST album is lovely, but I heard it a bunch leading up to this release, so now I really enjoy the film score presentation.  The juxtaposition of the first three cues, the Main Title followed by Leaving Home followed by The Family - is a really great way to set the rest of the score up.  I love this little gem.
  24. Like
    Romão reacted to Incanus in What Is The Last Score You Listened To?   
    Sleepy Hollow by Danny Elfman: Still among my top 5 Elfman scores. It is superbly thematic, Gothically raucous and intricate in its writing with the main musical ideas constantly being reworked and spun around each other throughout the album. The finale from The Windmill onwards is breathless and expertly weaves in and out of the long exposition scene with intercut Headless Horseman approach shots culminating in The Chase and the piece with the classic Elfman track title The Final Confrontation. The rest of the score is equally intricate and dramatic with nary a dull moment throughout. I would love to have a complete presentation of this score, even though most of the unreleased music is shorter connective material as it would just add to the dark glory of this score.
     
    Robin Hood  Prince of Thieves by Michael Kamen: I really like this score and think that a better recording/performance would certainly raise my appreciation even more. Someone should re-record this with better acoustics and mixing as the original recording feels very closed and small which sucks some of the dynamics out of the music. Still there is some of Kamen's loveliest melodic and swashbuckling material to be found in this score and I find myself revisiting it more often that we now have Intrada's release of the music.
     
    Blue Max (Tadlow re-recording) by Jerry Goldsmith: I simply loved this score from the first moment I heard it and the Tadlow re-recording is a resounding success. Jerry's score is a textbook case of how to score a movie about flying and aviation as his music depicts all the grandeur, thrill and danger of flight in the most pulse pounding, inspiring way, the music literally taking flight right in the Main Title. I don't think there is a wasted note in this one and every piece whether love music or the classically constructed battle passacaglias feels part of a greater dramatic arc.  
  25. Haha
    Romão got a reaction from Arpy in Laugh Out Loud - Unintentionally Funny Movie Moments   
    I always found this scene specially ridiculous:
     
     
    Tom Cruise has done several in this vein
     
    That's one the best ever
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