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karelm

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  1. Thanks
    karelm got a reaction from superultramegaa in The Composer's Thread   
    That's a solid piece.  Well done!  If I had anything constructive to add, this could be a longer piece just allowing a bit more ebb and flow of the very same material you have, just taking more space to state it at the start.  There is a balance between taking too long to get to the point and rushing to the point.  I think Ralph Vaughan Williams really nails the balance in his symphonies, probably best in his No. 5, but generally he is very good at the balance between overstaying an idea's welcome and giving it time enough to breathe.  I really liked it!
  2. Like
    karelm reacted to superultramegaa in The Composer's Thread   
    Finally finished a classical composition for spring. I didn't have any specific form in mind, it's more or less my attempt to develop a single motif through many variations. 
     
     
  3. Like
    karelm got a reaction from SteveMc in Interesting vintage interview   
    If this is 1982, then kudos to the interviewer for not asking anything about Star Wars, Raiders, or ET and asking lots of interesting questions about JW's creative programming ideas and thoughts on contemporary music.  This is a very rare Golden Age interview and JW seemed very engaged with the subject.  He did commission Sir Peter Maxwell Davies' "Orkney Wedding with Sunrise" in 1989, easily that composer's most accessible work but I think it says a lot about JW that he thought so highly of that composers atonal works.   I love how he straddles and contemplates popular music and its context in serious music like his great predecessors, Prokofiev, Shostakovitch, and Vaughan Williams.  It is also fascinating how extremely well versed he was in the contemporary artists of that time.  Many of whom I've never even heard of.  This interview clearly shows he was extremely knowledgeable and as I previously stated, professorial.  Seriously, how rare is it to have a great, great film composer who understood popular music and contemporary concert music as well as he does?  Jon Burlingame said there were a few "experts" before.  Miklos Rozsa was considered a musicologist who possessed an academic knowledge of music that set him apart from his compositional achievements.  Alfred Newman was considered to have concert conducting skills - he could have been a famous concert conductor if he chose that path.  JW posses all these rare gifts along with his compositional talent and those are displayed here.  Seriously, after him, there is no one left of this breadth of mastery. 
  4. Like
    karelm got a reaction from SteveMc in Interesting vintage interview   
    I really enjoyed this vintage interview where JW talks about contemporary music and his ambitions for the Boston Pops.  JW comes across very professorially and I found it really interesting at the start that he admired Seiji Ozawa's performance of Maxwell Davies Symphony (I can't tell which one it is but pretty sure it is his No. 1).  I have a personal connection with Sir Peter Maxwell Davies.  In the 1990's, I was a student and found out he was coming to San Francisco to conduct a world premiere of a work the SFO had commissioned.  I sent him an email and to my surprise, he responded inviting me to come back stage during the rehearsal and watch him work with the orchestra.  I had the entire concert hall to myself.  After the rehearsal, Sir Peter, looked for me and invited me backstage to his dressing room.  He was so warm and inviting, I was not just a no body, I wasn't even a composition student.  But he was very interested in seeing what I had done and giving me advise.  That encounter had a big impact on me as a student and I never forgot his generosity and encouragement tempered with wisdom ("it's a very difficult path you're on and if you can make a living doing something else, probably better to go that route").  I found it quite interesting that JW thought so highly of him regarding the Symphony No. 1 though it's so different from JW's own style - it's a loud, hour long, atonal symphony.  I thought it was interesting to hear JW talk so much about contemporary music and his ideas plus his own works in context.
     
    At 8:31, he says "Last year I wrote an overture..." what work was this?
  5. Thanks
    karelm got a reaction from Marcus in Interesting vintage interview   
    I really enjoyed this vintage interview where JW talks about contemporary music and his ambitions for the Boston Pops.  JW comes across very professorially and I found it really interesting at the start that he admired Seiji Ozawa's performance of Maxwell Davies Symphony (I can't tell which one it is but pretty sure it is his No. 1).  I have a personal connection with Sir Peter Maxwell Davies.  In the 1990's, I was a student and found out he was coming to San Francisco to conduct a world premiere of a work the SFO had commissioned.  I sent him an email and to my surprise, he responded inviting me to come back stage during the rehearsal and watch him work with the orchestra.  I had the entire concert hall to myself.  After the rehearsal, Sir Peter, looked for me and invited me backstage to his dressing room.  He was so warm and inviting, I was not just a no body, I wasn't even a composition student.  But he was very interested in seeing what I had done and giving me advise.  That encounter had a big impact on me as a student and I never forgot his generosity and encouragement tempered with wisdom ("it's a very difficult path you're on and if you can make a living doing something else, probably better to go that route").  I found it quite interesting that JW thought so highly of him regarding the Symphony No. 1 though it's so different from JW's own style - it's a loud, hour long, atonal symphony.  I thought it was interesting to hear JW talk so much about contemporary music and his ideas plus his own works in context.
     
    At 8:31, he says "Last year I wrote an overture..." what work was this?
  6. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Bayesian in Interesting vintage interview   
    If this is 1982, then kudos to the interviewer for not asking anything about Star Wars, Raiders, or ET and asking lots of interesting questions about JW's creative programming ideas and thoughts on contemporary music.  This is a very rare Golden Age interview and JW seemed very engaged with the subject.  He did commission Sir Peter Maxwell Davies' "Orkney Wedding with Sunrise" in 1989, easily that composer's most accessible work but I think it says a lot about JW that he thought so highly of that composers atonal works.   I love how he straddles and contemplates popular music and its context in serious music like his great predecessors, Prokofiev, Shostakovitch, and Vaughan Williams.  It is also fascinating how extremely well versed he was in the contemporary artists of that time.  Many of whom I've never even heard of.  This interview clearly shows he was extremely knowledgeable and as I previously stated, professorial.  Seriously, how rare is it to have a great, great film composer who understood popular music and contemporary concert music as well as he does?  Jon Burlingame said there were a few "experts" before.  Miklos Rozsa was considered a musicologist who possessed an academic knowledge of music that set him apart from his compositional achievements.  Alfred Newman was considered to have concert conducting skills - he could have been a famous concert conductor if he chose that path.  JW posses all these rare gifts along with his compositional talent and those are displayed here.  Seriously, after him, there is no one left of this breadth of mastery. 
  7. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Jay in Interesting vintage interview   
    If this is 1982, then kudos to the interviewer for not asking anything about Star Wars, Raiders, or ET and asking lots of interesting questions about JW's creative programming ideas and thoughts on contemporary music.  This is a very rare Golden Age interview and JW seemed very engaged with the subject.  He did commission Sir Peter Maxwell Davies' "Orkney Wedding with Sunrise" in 1989, easily that composer's most accessible work but I think it says a lot about JW that he thought so highly of that composers atonal works.   I love how he straddles and contemplates popular music and its context in serious music like his great predecessors, Prokofiev, Shostakovitch, and Vaughan Williams.  It is also fascinating how extremely well versed he was in the contemporary artists of that time.  Many of whom I've never even heard of.  This interview clearly shows he was extremely knowledgeable and as I previously stated, professorial.  Seriously, how rare is it to have a great, great film composer who understood popular music and contemporary concert music as well as he does?  Jon Burlingame said there were a few "experts" before.  Miklos Rozsa was considered a musicologist who possessed an academic knowledge of music that set him apart from his compositional achievements.  Alfred Newman was considered to have concert conducting skills - he could have been a famous concert conductor if he chose that path.  JW posses all these rare gifts along with his compositional talent and those are displayed here.  Seriously, after him, there is no one left of this breadth of mastery. 
  8. Like
    karelm reacted to Thor in Interesting vintage interview   
    It's a good interview that was shared here a few years ago (it was not on Youtube at the time, but from some Boston-based TV network site, if memory serves).
     
    Cool story about Maxwell Davies, karelm!
  9. Thanks
    karelm got a reaction from carlborg in Interesting vintage interview   
    I really enjoyed this vintage interview where JW talks about contemporary music and his ambitions for the Boston Pops.  JW comes across very professorially and I found it really interesting at the start that he admired Seiji Ozawa's performance of Maxwell Davies Symphony (I can't tell which one it is but pretty sure it is his No. 1).  I have a personal connection with Sir Peter Maxwell Davies.  In the 1990's, I was a student and found out he was coming to San Francisco to conduct a world premiere of a work the SFO had commissioned.  I sent him an email and to my surprise, he responded inviting me to come back stage during the rehearsal and watch him work with the orchestra.  I had the entire concert hall to myself.  After the rehearsal, Sir Peter, looked for me and invited me backstage to his dressing room.  He was so warm and inviting, I was not just a no body, I wasn't even a composition student.  But he was very interested in seeing what I had done and giving me advise.  That encounter had a big impact on me as a student and I never forgot his generosity and encouragement tempered with wisdom ("it's a very difficult path you're on and if you can make a living doing something else, probably better to go that route").  I found it quite interesting that JW thought so highly of him regarding the Symphony No. 1 though it's so different from JW's own style - it's a loud, hour long, atonal symphony.  I thought it was interesting to hear JW talk so much about contemporary music and his ideas plus his own works in context.
     
    At 8:31, he says "Last year I wrote an overture..." what work was this?
  10. Like
    karelm got a reaction from carlborg in Interesting vintage interview   
    If this is 1982, then kudos to the interviewer for not asking anything about Star Wars, Raiders, or ET and asking lots of interesting questions about JW's creative programming ideas and thoughts on contemporary music.  This is a very rare Golden Age interview and JW seemed very engaged with the subject.  He did commission Sir Peter Maxwell Davies' "Orkney Wedding with Sunrise" in 1989, easily that composer's most accessible work but I think it says a lot about JW that he thought so highly of that composers atonal works.   I love how he straddles and contemplates popular music and its context in serious music like his great predecessors, Prokofiev, Shostakovitch, and Vaughan Williams.  It is also fascinating how extremely well versed he was in the contemporary artists of that time.  Many of whom I've never even heard of.  This interview clearly shows he was extremely knowledgeable and as I previously stated, professorial.  Seriously, how rare is it to have a great, great film composer who understood popular music and contemporary concert music as well as he does?  Jon Burlingame said there were a few "experts" before.  Miklos Rozsa was considered a musicologist who possessed an academic knowledge of music that set him apart from his compositional achievements.  Alfred Newman was considered to have concert conducting skills - he could have been a famous concert conductor if he chose that path.  JW posses all these rare gifts along with his compositional talent and those are displayed here.  Seriously, after him, there is no one left of this breadth of mastery. 
  11. Like
    karelm got a reaction from GerateWohl in Interesting vintage interview   
    If this is 1982, then kudos to the interviewer for not asking anything about Star Wars, Raiders, or ET and asking lots of interesting questions about JW's creative programming ideas and thoughts on contemporary music.  This is a very rare Golden Age interview and JW seemed very engaged with the subject.  He did commission Sir Peter Maxwell Davies' "Orkney Wedding with Sunrise" in 1989, easily that composer's most accessible work but I think it says a lot about JW that he thought so highly of that composers atonal works.   I love how he straddles and contemplates popular music and its context in serious music like his great predecessors, Prokofiev, Shostakovitch, and Vaughan Williams.  It is also fascinating how extremely well versed he was in the contemporary artists of that time.  Many of whom I've never even heard of.  This interview clearly shows he was extremely knowledgeable and as I previously stated, professorial.  Seriously, how rare is it to have a great, great film composer who understood popular music and contemporary concert music as well as he does?  Jon Burlingame said there were a few "experts" before.  Miklos Rozsa was considered a musicologist who possessed an academic knowledge of music that set him apart from his compositional achievements.  Alfred Newman was considered to have concert conducting skills - he could have been a famous concert conductor if he chose that path.  JW posses all these rare gifts along with his compositional talent and those are displayed here.  Seriously, after him, there is no one left of this breadth of mastery. 
  12. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Miguel Andrade in Interesting vintage interview   
    If this is 1982, then kudos to the interviewer for not asking anything about Star Wars, Raiders, or ET and asking lots of interesting questions about JW's creative programming ideas and thoughts on contemporary music.  This is a very rare Golden Age interview and JW seemed very engaged with the subject.  He did commission Sir Peter Maxwell Davies' "Orkney Wedding with Sunrise" in 1989, easily that composer's most accessible work but I think it says a lot about JW that he thought so highly of that composers atonal works.   I love how he straddles and contemplates popular music and its context in serious music like his great predecessors, Prokofiev, Shostakovitch, and Vaughan Williams.  It is also fascinating how extremely well versed he was in the contemporary artists of that time.  Many of whom I've never even heard of.  This interview clearly shows he was extremely knowledgeable and as I previously stated, professorial.  Seriously, how rare is it to have a great, great film composer who understood popular music and contemporary concert music as well as he does?  Jon Burlingame said there were a few "experts" before.  Miklos Rozsa was considered a musicologist who possessed an academic knowledge of music that set him apart from his compositional achievements.  Alfred Newman was considered to have concert conducting skills - he could have been a famous concert conductor if he chose that path.  JW posses all these rare gifts along with his compositional talent and those are displayed here.  Seriously, after him, there is no one left of this breadth of mastery. 
  13. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Holko in Interesting vintage interview   
    If this is 1982, then kudos to the interviewer for not asking anything about Star Wars, Raiders, or ET and asking lots of interesting questions about JW's creative programming ideas and thoughts on contemporary music.  This is a very rare Golden Age interview and JW seemed very engaged with the subject.  He did commission Sir Peter Maxwell Davies' "Orkney Wedding with Sunrise" in 1989, easily that composer's most accessible work but I think it says a lot about JW that he thought so highly of that composers atonal works.   I love how he straddles and contemplates popular music and its context in serious music like his great predecessors, Prokofiev, Shostakovitch, and Vaughan Williams.  It is also fascinating how extremely well versed he was in the contemporary artists of that time.  Many of whom I've never even heard of.  This interview clearly shows he was extremely knowledgeable and as I previously stated, professorial.  Seriously, how rare is it to have a great, great film composer who understood popular music and contemporary concert music as well as he does?  Jon Burlingame said there were a few "experts" before.  Miklos Rozsa was considered a musicologist who possessed an academic knowledge of music that set him apart from his compositional achievements.  Alfred Newman was considered to have concert conducting skills - he could have been a famous concert conductor if he chose that path.  JW posses all these rare gifts along with his compositional talent and those are displayed here.  Seriously, after him, there is no one left of this breadth of mastery. 
  14. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Marian Schedenig in Interesting vintage interview   
    If this is 1982, then kudos to the interviewer for not asking anything about Star Wars, Raiders, or ET and asking lots of interesting questions about JW's creative programming ideas and thoughts on contemporary music.  This is a very rare Golden Age interview and JW seemed very engaged with the subject.  He did commission Sir Peter Maxwell Davies' "Orkney Wedding with Sunrise" in 1989, easily that composer's most accessible work but I think it says a lot about JW that he thought so highly of that composers atonal works.   I love how he straddles and contemplates popular music and its context in serious music like his great predecessors, Prokofiev, Shostakovitch, and Vaughan Williams.  It is also fascinating how extremely well versed he was in the contemporary artists of that time.  Many of whom I've never even heard of.  This interview clearly shows he was extremely knowledgeable and as I previously stated, professorial.  Seriously, how rare is it to have a great, great film composer who understood popular music and contemporary concert music as well as he does?  Jon Burlingame said there were a few "experts" before.  Miklos Rozsa was considered a musicologist who possessed an academic knowledge of music that set him apart from his compositional achievements.  Alfred Newman was considered to have concert conducting skills - he could have been a famous concert conductor if he chose that path.  JW posses all these rare gifts along with his compositional talent and those are displayed here.  Seriously, after him, there is no one left of this breadth of mastery. 
  15. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Marian Schedenig in Interesting vintage interview   
    I really enjoyed this vintage interview where JW talks about contemporary music and his ambitions for the Boston Pops.  JW comes across very professorially and I found it really interesting at the start that he admired Seiji Ozawa's performance of Maxwell Davies Symphony (I can't tell which one it is but pretty sure it is his No. 1).  I have a personal connection with Sir Peter Maxwell Davies.  In the 1990's, I was a student and found out he was coming to San Francisco to conduct a world premiere of a work the SFO had commissioned.  I sent him an email and to my surprise, he responded inviting me to come back stage during the rehearsal and watch him work with the orchestra.  I had the entire concert hall to myself.  After the rehearsal, Sir Peter, looked for me and invited me backstage to his dressing room.  He was so warm and inviting, I was not just a no body, I wasn't even a composition student.  But he was very interested in seeing what I had done and giving me advise.  That encounter had a big impact on me as a student and I never forgot his generosity and encouragement tempered with wisdom ("it's a very difficult path you're on and if you can make a living doing something else, probably better to go that route").  I found it quite interesting that JW thought so highly of him regarding the Symphony No. 1 though it's so different from JW's own style - it's a loud, hour long, atonal symphony.  I thought it was interesting to hear JW talk so much about contemporary music and his ideas plus his own works in context.
     
    At 8:31, he says "Last year I wrote an overture..." what work was this?
  16. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Manakin Skywalker in The Composer's Thread   
    Something old is something new again.   This is based on something I composed 20 years ago and recently found and dusted it off into a brand new piece.  Yes, I was going through a James Horner phase.  This is probably my largest scale work for full orchestra, choir, and organ!
     
    https://clyp.it/1pzux4g5
     
  17. Like
    karelm got a reaction from SteveMc in The Composer's Thread   
    Something old is something new again.   This is based on something I composed 20 years ago and recently found and dusted it off into a brand new piece.  Yes, I was going through a James Horner phase.  This is probably my largest scale work for full orchestra, choir, and organ!
     
    https://clyp.it/1pzux4g5
     
  18. Like
    karelm got a reaction from SteveMc in The Classical Music Recommendation Thread   
    I love, LOVE Kevin Puts!  He's a JW fan too!
  19. Like
    karelm reacted to SteveMc in The Classical Music Recommendation Thread   
    Two different takes on musical postmodernism.  
    Dalbavie.  Thorny, but engaging.
    Kevin Puts.  Absolutely lovely. 
     
  20. Like
    karelm reacted to Disco Stu in The Classical Music Recommendation Thread   
    The American composer Lowell Liebermann has a new album out today as a pianist.  He plays works written by himself and also by Miloslav Kabeláč, Liszt, Schubert, and Busoni.
     
    I've only listened to his own pieces, but I'm a big fan of his music and can unequivocally recommend those:
     
    Gargoyles
    4 Apparitions
    Nocturne No. 10
     

  21. Like
    karelm reacted to Loert in The Classical Music Recommendation Thread   
    0:00 - 6:00
    The best 6 minutes Shostakovich ever wrote:
     
     
  22. Like
    karelm reacted to Jay in Prelude for Piano and Orchestra (new Williams composition - premiered June 2021; Albany Symphony performance & recording coming 2022)   
    Typo fixed
     
     
     
    I understand, which is why there is no reason to add "Prelude" to your website at all.
     
    You should either list all these works:
    Violin Concerto Hollywood Bowl Centennial Fanfare Vienne Processional Prelude Or none of these works.
     
    All of them are identical to each other.
     
    They are all works that have been announced, but have not been performed yet.
     
    There is literally nothing making Prelude different in any way from any of these other 3 works.
  23. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Miguel Andrade in Prelude for Piano and Orchestra (new Williams composition - premiered June 2021; Albany Symphony performance & recording coming 2022)   
    There is also a violin concerto he composed for Anne Sophie Mutter in 2020.  They talked about it together on CBS Sunday Morning interview last year.
     
    Albany Symphony
  24. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Will in Does JW listen to expansions when approving them? Does he remember older scores simply reading the cue list?   
    I think I remember Jay did an interview with Mike and one of the questions of the extent of JW's involvement was discussed.  It sounded like he's quite involved even saying certain cues can't be released for various reasons.
  25. Thanks
    karelm got a reaction from filmmusic in James Horner - ALIENS in full score (Chris Siddall Publishing)   
    The cello notes are not C but a cluster starting on C, C#, D, D#, E (divided in 5) all starting on their respective notes glissing up the string.
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