Muad'Dib

The Classical Music Recommendation Thread

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Not "classical" but I've been curious about this in the past few days.

Eric Whitacre wrote a different bridge for his concert band arrangement of Lux Aurumque at 1:50.

It reminds of something, like a film score. But I can't quite put my finger on it. Anyone else feel the same way, or am I just going crazy?

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It does sound very Whitacre, but that specific passage just reminded me of something else...maybe it just reminded of the same piece (since the last time I really heard was quite a while ago :P).

I can't say I'm Whitacre's biggest fan (I think he's a bit overrated), but October is sublime.

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Godzilla is really entertaining to watch (especially when bands really stage the piece up), but a bit uninteresting when played. Ghost Train is a fun piece.

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Could anybody recommend me more stuff that goes in the vein of Stravinsky's Firebird? The whole work is phenomenal, and its been a favorite of mine since I was a kid, and now for whatever reason, relistening to it, I feel like I want more of that.

I found two good influences that are Rimsky-Korsakov and Alexander Scriabin, but the latter is a little too complex for me. What I like about Firebird is how simple it feels. It's by no means an easy piece, but everything seems so well put together and so effortestly. It feels natural, real, sincere.

Here are two pieces by Korsakov and Scriabin that I really like, in case you're not familiar with them, and that remind me of Stravinsky:

I really like that sort of neo-romantic sound, but in Stravinsky's hands it feels like perfection. Anything you guys can recommend?

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Could anybody recommend me more stuff that goes in the vein of Stravinsky's Firebird?

Check out some of Prokofiev's ballet scores, if you haven't already. The Scythian Suite is kind of close relative to Stravinsky's Firebird:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5wPD48CcxVo

(this is a stellar performance, check it out!)

Also, two of his most famous: Romeo & Juliet and Cinderella

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnMkUtgnFKE

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I'm not familiar with them, but I'd love to hear some of his works! Could you post some links of what you is representative of them?

How have I not seen this thread?

Any fans of Max Richter or Ludovico Einaudi? Contemporary classical composers.

I started a thread about Richter a few days ago: http://www.jwfan.com...showtopic=22547

Cool, I'll have to check those clips out soon.

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Listening to Rachmaninov's Symphonic Dances. A very nostalgic piece, I think his final work. It revisits the territory from his first symphony and contains a fantastic finale in which one of the theme from Sergei's own All-Night Vigil choral composition (apparently his own personal favourite) battles the infamous Dies Irae. Splendid stuff! Coincidentally, the LSO Live disc I got got this years Grammy nomination today for the best orchestral performance. It also contains Stravinsky's Symphony In Three Movements, which is great as well. Highly recommended.

LSO-Rachmaninov-Stravinsky.jpg

Speaking of Rachmaninov, he might be my favourite composers of all. Wonderfully gentle and turbulent at the same time. Pure magic.

Karol

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I've got a 3 disc set with his first 3 symphonies, Symphonic Dances and the Isle of the Dead. Conducted by Jansons and performed by the St. Petersburg Orchestra It was great,

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I've got a 2-disc version of him conducting the three symphonies. I can imagine these are the same performances, right?

Karol

Not sure. This is the version I have (on London, or Decca depending on which country you're in...)

http://www.amazon.com/Rachmaninov-Symphonies-Sergey/dp/B0000042HY/ref=sr_1_2?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1354898026&sr=1-2&keywords=rachmaninov+ashkenazy

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Just came back from the concert in which they played the sensational second symphony by Jean Sibelius (Kamen's Dead Zone quite notably quotes a theme from the second movement) and also something I've not been familiar with - Elgar's obscure choral piece The Music Makers. The performance was opened Sibelius' lovely tone poem The Bard.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ii2z5wdBRpw

The Halle orchestra was conducted by Sir Mark Eldar and I really enjoyed myself.

Karol

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I dive back into the French Suites, English Suites and Partitas, who form a trilogy of suites for keyboard composed by Johann Sebastian Bach.

This musical form which goes back to the baroque period from the XVIth to the XVIIIth century, is no more no less than the ancestor of the sonata.

They are real small jewels of ingenuity and sensibility (yes yes, it is possible with Bach!)

Impossible for example not to be moved by the beauty of the Allemande of the French Suite N° 2...

Suggested version for its "neutrality" and its good taste: Andràs Schiff (piano).

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I learned recently that John Williams is considered by many as a neo-romantic.

Here is another neo-romantic: Bruckner.

Don't know much about this composer, but love this CD :

Bruckner: Symphony No 4 / Nezet-Seguin, Orchestre Metropolitan

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=640877

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I'd think that Bruckner would be thought of as just a romantic, since he was writing during that period and not reviving it later. Williams might be something of a neo-romantic in the way he approaches motives (Wagner is the obvious influence) in most of his scores, but his musical language is much more influenced by 20th century composers/jazz, I think.

But who cares how things are classified. Here's some wonderful Bruckner.

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That's a fantastic piece. We had that on our choir schedule once, but sadly not for long (never actually had it in a concert).

Mauceri would call Williams a main romantic And Wagner, Bruckner & Co time just the early phase of the romantic era. But in general, Bruckner is definitely a "regular" romantic composer - working largely at the same time as Wagner (save for the last two and a half symphonies) and, more importantly, before Mahler and Strauss (he was Mahler's teacher at one point).

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That's a fantastic piece. We had that on our choir schedule once, but sadly not for long (never actually had it in a concert).

That's too bad. I was lucky enough to sing it in a stunning acoustic space, along with some Bach, Ligeti, and Whitacre. Fantastic experience.

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A discovery I made few years ago.

 

André Mathieu (1928-1968)

 

The sad fate of the composer from Quebec André Mathieu, is the story of a child who lived the music with the exceptional capacities of a Mozart and dreamed about an ideal that he was not able to embody because of the incomprehension of his contemporaries...

 

Mathieu's style leaned towards the late Romantic school of Rachmaninov, but it's true North American music and it's far nearest from us!

 

Concerto No. 4 in E Minor for Piano and Orchestra (A. Mathieu, Lefèvre, OSQ, Talmi)

 

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@TheGreyPilgrim
@Melange

 

Thanks for the links guys!

 

Here is another wonderful André Mathieu, I really love this kind of composition even if I'm not usually into "modern" classical music.

 

André Mathieu - Rhapsodie Romantique (Lefèvre, OSM, Bamert)

 

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@TheGreyPilgrim

I must admit, I have a crush! Have to discover much of this Albéric Magnard, maybe it will reconciliate me with French music!

Also, the version you've put here is a recommended version on the site arkivmusic.com. Great :)

326496.JPG

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=41933

I will see if I can find this CD somewhere, again thanks!

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Glad to hear it! But we both owe thanks to the person that posts these "unknown" symphonies on Youtube. There are quite a few to explore.



Don't know if there are any other fans of the organ out there, but it was a key part of my first musical experiences (including seeing James Mason play one as Captain Nemo) and I've always had a special place in my heart for it. Maurice Durufle was a truly remarkable composer, who left painfully few pieces due to a crippling streak of perfectionism. This is one of his gems. Written in tribute to fellow composer/organist Jehan Alain, who was killed (in notably badass fashion) during the second world war. The flowing triplet figures in the prelude are derived from the name ALAIN, Durufle quotes one of Alain's pieces, Litanies, several times throughout the prelude, and the fugue subject is once again based on the memorialized composer's name. Typical motivic and architectural genius for good old Maurice.

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The organ... not too often... :D

I'm a big Bach lover... But I must admit, I prefer the piano over the organ and harpsichord.

You surely know this... Symphony N° 3 of Camille Saint-Saens... A Concerto "with organ"... That maybe the best way for me to listen organ!

I bought many RCA Red Seal "Living Stereo" CD few years ago... SACD, even if I'm not equiped to listen them in SACD :)

They are old classics recordings but in really really really good condition.

Charles Munch was a director I've discovered with that collection.

Great director and Great work!

http://youtu.be/_-KEVlAbyk8

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Yes, that's a fine piece, and nice to hear this movement instead of the oft-cited bombastic finale.

If you can handle the organ within an orchestral context, I'd recommend this too. Wonderful piece, here's the first movement.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=33zaoSetk2I&feature=share&list=PL6E56C5B5D58E8162

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@Michael

 

Sorry, this kind of music gives me murder desires, have to stop after few seconds!

 

I like calm music, noble music.

 

Talking about noble music, this week I was listening again to and old album on which I always return.

 

I lisetened to several versions of these pieces, historical or newer performances, but this can't beat that classic.

 

Johann Sebastian Bach - Orchestral Suites

Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, Marriner

 

Bach: Orchestral Suites Nos. 1-4

 

Orchestral Suite No. 2 in B minor, BWV 1067 - Rondeau

 

Bach: Orchestral Suite #2 In B Minor, BWV 1067 - 2. Rondeau by Neville Marriner: Academy Of St. Martin In The Fields on Grooveshark

 

Orchestral Suite No. 2 in B minor, BWV 1067 - Sarabande

 

Bach: Orchestral Suite #2 In B Minor, BWV 1067 - 3. Sarabande by Neville Marriner: Academy Of St. Martin In The Fields on Grooveshark

 

Orchestral Suite No. 2 in B minor, BWV 1067 - Menuet

 

Bach: Orchestral Suite #2 In B Minor, BWV 1067 - 6. Menuet by Neville Marriner: Academy Of St. Martin In The Fields on Grooveshark

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This is the most wonderful thing I have heard in a very long time:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pMjhEQG75WQ

Agreed, very fine

@Michael

Sorry, this kind of music gives me murder desires, have to stop after few seconds!

I like calm music, noble music.

Yet here you are on a film music message board! Music should be all kinds of things, not just calm and noble. Bach recognized that.

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