Jump to content

Romão

Members
  • Content Count

    12121
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    7

Reputation Activity

  1. Thanks
    Romão got a reaction from publicist in Which are your Top 5 James Horner scores?   
    The Main Titles are absolutely perfect. One of the most striking examples I haver ever witnessed of an opening piece of music immediately setting the tone and feel of the film that will follow.
  2. Like
    Romão got a reaction from Ricard in What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)   
    First time watching this. And having a passing knowledge of the formula, tone and structure of its numerous sequels, I must say I was surprised how good this actually was. Wonderfully character driven, naturalistic performances, great sense of place and period, much grimier than I expected. This was considered schmaltzy in 1976 (and it is). But this is far richer and tasteful schmaltz than what we got in the subsequent decades. And Stallone's integrity and respect for the audience (that always comes through even in his most dismal roles and performances) is given the perfect vehicle for expression. Spot on, tone perfect performance.
     
    This movie won the Best Picture Oscar in one of the best pic nominees line ups I can remember:
     
    Rocky
    All the President's Men
    Network
    Bound for Glory
    Taxi Driver
     
    so that might have helped to drag its reputation down, as the movie that prevented superior works from being fully acknowledged, but this truly is a 70's version of a feel good movie. It's a movie I had always thought I had seen without actually seeing it. Than I knew already all the plot beats. But story remains much more important than plot.
     
    Much, much better than I was expecting.
     
     
  3. Like
    Romão got a reaction from Quintus in The Official Adventure Gaming thread!   
    So, thanks to Laserschwert's wonderful efforts, I decided to print the poster art for the first two Monkey Island games and have them framed in old, piratey-looking frames I found in thrift-shops. Took a while to convince the missus  This is the result:
     
     

  4. Like
    Romão got a reaction from Bespin in What Is The Last Score You Listened To?   
    Aqui também
  5. Like
    Romão got a reaction from Edmilson in What Is The Last Score You Listened To?   
    Aqui também
  6. Like
    Romão reacted to toothless in Favorite short musical moments in Williams scores?   
    It's been a while I haven't posted in this thread and I'm sure this has already been share but, hell! This moment gives me a big smile and, to me, screams like Williams is saying
     
     
    1:09 - 1:26
     
     
  7. Like
    Romão reacted to ragoz350 in Empire Of The Sun - La-La Land 2CD   
    Still I decided to synchronize this mockup with the image. I had to slightly correct the shots (since this is mockup, heh), the sync points are clear, but I don't know what to synchronize with the beginning of the piano solo - perhaps something was even cut out at this moment, but I decided to slow down the shot, where a column of cars passing the checkpoint.

     
  8. Like
    Romão reacted to thx99 in From what Williams score you would like to have a re-recording?   
    Jane Eyre, without hesitation.
  9. Like
    Romão reacted to Chewy in WAR OF THE WORLDS (2005) 2CD edition from Intrada Records NOW AVAILABLE   
    Here's my attempt at isolating the choir that plays in The Intersection Scene using the two tracks from the new release. This sounds so creepy!
     

  10. Like
    Romão got a reaction from Holko in The Official Adventure Gaming thread!   
    The first game in what I consider to be the most endearing, enduring, enchanting of all video game universes was released 30 years ago.
     
    Happy 30th anniversary to the absolutely legendary:
     

     
  11. Like
    Romão reacted to TownerFan in The Legacy of John Williams - New Blog on JW   
    Thank you dearly, @Incanus. I'm so glad you're enjoying this.
     
    Check the latest episode with Mike Matessino discussing WAR OF THE WORLDS:
     
    https://thelegacyofjohnwilliams.com/2020/10/12/war-of-the-worlds-podcast/
  12. Like
    Romão reacted to publicist in What Is The Last Score You Listened To?   
    As befits the season: autumnal chilly moodiness 
     
     
  13. Like
    Romão reacted to Tom Guernsey in What Is The Last Score You Listened To?   
    Henry V (Patrick Doyle) - Surely destined to remain one of the finest debut scores of all time, it remains one of his finest efforts. I've always been partial to the rapturous "Wooing of Katherine", which is a prototypical Doyle melody. Just a shame that the sound quality of the album leaves a bit to be desired, surprising given that it's conducted by a world class conductor (albeit Simon Rattle wasn't quite so famous in 1989). Maybe it'll get a remastering sometime. Is it me, or does the sudden increase in tempo during the orchestral interlude during "Non Nobis Domine" not feel quite right?
  14. Thanks
    Romão reacted to Naïve Old Fart in What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Newer films)   
    It is against the law to like anything, by that man!
    His name says it all!
  15. Like
    Romão reacted to TownerFan in WAR OF THE WORLDS (2005) 2CD edition from Intrada Records NOW AVAILABLE   
    https://thelegacyofjohnwilliams.com/2020/10/12/war-of-the-worlds-podcast/
     
    Also available as a YouTube video:
     
    Hope you'll like it, gents!
  16. Like
    Romão got a reaction from Naïve Old Fart in Upcoming Films   
    Cleopatra was actually of Greek ancestry (some think she might have some native Egyptian blood on her mother's side, but with no consensus).
     
    My history might be a bit hazy, but as far as I recall, she did indeed need the help of powerful men to even have a kingdom, which she only ruled as client state of Rome
  17. Thanks
    Romão got a reaction from Miguel Andrade in The Official "Album Presentation vs Complete & Chronological Presentation" Thread Round 2   
    That's not so much the issue, it's more like you refuse to try anything on a pizza that has the same color or shape of a sardine, regardless of the flavor
     
     
    I apologize for that, I should not have made any personal judgments.
     
    The thing that gets me, though, it's your almost absolute dismissal of expanded editions on principle, disregarding a whole plethora of nuance. You are potentially depriving yourself of musical enjoyment and discovery.
     
    Mind you, I agree with you that often shorter albums do serve some scores better. That some composers know, better than most, how to properly assemble an album to showcase his musical intentions. That there's an unhealthy obsession with unearthing and having available everything single second of music recorded for a given score. We are in absolute agreement there. However, there are frequent nuanced situations:
     
    - The OST album and the expansion offer totally different, but valid,  listening experiences, without one replacing the other. Example: E.T., Jaws
     
    - The OST album was severely lacking in the way it presented the score (due to various factors, like short length, odd sequencing, lacking in sound quality, over-reliance on the inclusion of pop songs for commercial purposes, etc.), and only through the expanded edition did the score really come to fruition. Examples: The Shadow, A.I.
     
    - The OST already presented a good distillation of the score and great listening experience, but the expanded edition made the whole architecture of the score come to life, to the point tracks already included on the OST are given a new whole dimension due to the context that surrounds them. Examples: Dracula, The Lost World.
     
    - The OST was a great album, but the score is simply too sprawling and plentiful in riches to the be contained to a single cd. Examples: The Empire Strikes Back, The Phantom Menace, Hook.
     
    - The OST was a perfect summation of the score and the extra music on the expanded edition, while interesting on its own, did not improve the listening experience. Examples: Ran, Batman, Jurassic Park.
     
    - The OST was a great album, but the choice of tracks included was influenced by other factors besides purely musical flow, so a better album assembly might have been possible had all the elements been available for inclusion. Examples: Sphere.
     
    - The OST was a great album assembly and the expanded score actually made the score seem worse. Examples: Masada, The Black Cauldron, The Fury.
     
    - The OST was a good presentation of the score and listening experience, but the expanded edition, while not being a perfect listening experience on its own, presents enough valid extra material for one's own improved playlist. Examples: Bram Stoker's Dracula, The Thin Red Line.
     
    - The expanded edition presents alternates that are great to listen on their own, even when completely removed from an album program. Examples: The Matrix Reloaded, Blade Runner.
     
    This is just meant to illustrate the plethora of nuances that might exist when discussing the merits and shortcomings of expanded editions. There can be no general stance or answer that applies to all situations.
     
     
     
     
  18. Like
    Romão got a reaction from KK in Jóhann Jóhannsson - ARRIVAL (2016)   
    That sounds fantastic!
     
    Jóhannsson would've been so perfect for Dune. 
  19. Like
    Romão got a reaction from Jurassic Shark in Who's your favourite film composer that you consider second-tier?   
    Probably someone like Basil Poledouris, only in the sense I wouldn't place him in the top echelon next to composers like Williams, Goldsmith, Hermann, Waxman, etc.
     
    I would consider him to be second tier, instead of second rate, which to my ear has a more negative connotation
  20. Like
    Romão reacted to Thor in The Official "Album Presentation vs Complete & Chronological Presentation" Thread Round 2   
    We'll attribute it to a momentary lapse of reason (great Pink Floyd album too, btw)!  Because outside that, you're one of the few levelheaded people who seem able to debate this rationally without making it personal. I'm not really interested in countering personal attacks, psycho-analyses and what-have-you.
     
    I wanted to address your individual examples from earlier. My replies will not be very suprising, but it goes to tell how different we experience these things.
     
     
    I've very, very rarely experienced that an expansion warrants a valid listening experience, and certainly not compared to the OST (if there is an OST). In the cases of E.T. and JAWS, the OSTs are on a whole other level, conceptually and structurally, than their subsequent expanded versions. So overall, these C&C versions hold little value to me as an album. However, I made use of the 20th anniversary edition of E.T. in an archival fashion: I analyzed the E.T. score in my university thesis, and included a CD with reference tracks. Since some of the cues I analyzed weren't on the MCA, but only on the 20th disc (which I got in the lavish E.T. gift box set from 2002), I included them on the reference CD. Expanded versions will always have this useful archival or archeological value for film and film score-in-context analyses.
     
     
    I will agree with you on the point of pop songs, and partly sound quality -- although that is very rarely an issue for me. It will have to be really bad, like Michael Small's MOUNTAINS OF THE MOON or the first release of RAIN MAN from Perseverance. In these cases, there is obviously room for improvement. Sequencing or length-wise, however, I disagree. I haven't heard the expanded version of THE SHADOW, but the OST works great as is. I tried sampling the expanded A.I., but quickly had to stop and delete it as it basically ruined my appreciation of the score as a 'musical work'.
     
     
    In terms of 'architecture', there is only one type that is relevant to me, and that is how it is REBUILT for album purposes. Filmic context is of no relevance to me in soundtrack listening. In both THE LOST WORLD and DRACULA, there is a beautiful structure on the OSTs that is sonata-like in nature (home-away-home again), for example by opening and closing the albums with concert-like pieces, and portioning out the romantic with the action-oriented evenly throughout the running time. Williams always does this well.
     
     
    In the case of TESB, I sorta agree with you; it's rich enough to warrant a little bit of extra music. I prefer the Arista box version over the OST (even if the OST is great as it is). For THE PHANTOM MENACE, the OST gets it. HOOK is rich, but already generously presented on the Epic CD. In fact, some of the action material kinda drags (like "The Ultimate War"). So I would actually have preferred an even more succinct release of some 60 minutes here.
     
     
    There have been times where I've heard a previously unreleased track, like "The Big Rescue" on SUPERMAN, and thought "hmmm, that was nice". But it's not something I've longed for or even want to have included. In that particular case, it could probably have been included on the OST without ruining its listening flow too much, but I live perfectly fine without it too (I sold my 2CD SUPERMAN set from Rhino years ago).
     
     
    I think SPHERE is fine. What 'other factors' do you have in mind? Re-use fees? 
     
    A lot of people find things like re-use fees or physical space limitations drawbacks. They can be, but they don't have to. In some cases, the alloted time (let's say two 20-minute blocks) forces the composer-producer to really focus their presentation; whittle it down and turn it into a 'symphony' of sorts.
     
     
    This, of course, is my 'default mode' in 95% of the cases.
     
     
    I've never really been fond of the 'interactive' approach that many fans have to soundtracks. It would be a bit like getting the sketch of a painting from an artist, and then a box of colour pencils to fill it out yourself. Or an unedited film that you're asked to edit yourself. The act of composing music for film is an artform, but so is the act of producing a listenable soundtrack album out of that score - which now becomes raw material. Adaptation is an artform; heck it's even a category at the Oscars.
     
    So I'd rather not do it myself, I'll leave it to the artist. But there are 'emergency situations' where no OST exists, and the album is too long. I then have to whittle it down and make a playlist myself. Rarely for something longer, though, but shorter.
     
    Kilar's DRACULA works fine in its OST; it's a very 'intense', chromatic and at times minimalistic score that only barely sustains its existing time, but the intense material has again been portioned out carefully, and doesn't  wear out its welcome. THE THIN RED LINE is pretty much perfection, as far as I'm concerned. I've never felt any need to add anything myself.
     
     
    Alternates, demos, bonus tracks etc. have no value for me as part of the listening experience. They can occasionally be fun and illuminating - in their archival, curiousity value, but that's about it. Occasionally, however, I've found some source cues that have their own innate musical quality and can be added to the listening experience, like Williams' GOODBYE MR. CHIPS. I like the 3CD BLADE RUNNER set because it's so clearly organized as musical journeys - the OST, then unreleased tracks organized into its own thing, then the inspired by-tracks, again organized into its own thing. It was never just a question of transferring music from the audio track on the film and onto an album.
     
    ----
     
    So in short, I'm obviously more extreme than you are. I'll never say 'it depends', which is the case for your examples above. My experience is more 9 times out 10, an expansion doesn't work as an album. I think this very much relates to my different and rather unique path into soundtracks, through other musical genres like prog rock and electronic music. Most people got interested in soundtracks through the films, and so they will always use the film - and the music therein - as their reference point. To me, that isn't really interesting. I'm only interested in how what I have works a musical ride.
     
    There is one question I haven't received so far, which is kinda surprising. That is: If you have so little interest in how the music appears in the film, then why do you listen to soundtracks at all?
  21. Like
    Romão reacted to KK in Jóhann Jóhannsson - ARRIVAL (2016)   
    Some unreleased Jóhannsson tracks have been put out as "rarities", including the one below from Arrival. I'm guessing this was the original opening piece that Villeneuve replaced with the Richter. He should have kept it.
     
     
  22. Like
    Romão got a reaction from Hedji in The Official "Album Presentation vs Complete & Chronological Presentation" Thread Round 2   
    That's not so much the issue, it's more like you refuse to try anything on a pizza that has the same color or shape of a sardine, regardless of the flavor
     
     
    I apologize for that, I should not have made any personal judgments.
     
    The thing that gets me, though, it's your almost absolute dismissal of expanded editions on principle, disregarding a whole plethora of nuance. You are potentially depriving yourself of musical enjoyment and discovery.
     
    Mind you, I agree with you that often shorter albums do serve some scores better. That some composers know, better than most, how to properly assemble an album to showcase his musical intentions. That there's an unhealthy obsession with unearthing and having available everything single second of music recorded for a given score. We are in absolute agreement there. However, there are frequent nuanced situations:
     
    - The OST album and the expansion offer totally different, but valid,  listening experiences, without one replacing the other. Example: E.T., Jaws
     
    - The OST album was severely lacking in the way it presented the score (due to various factors, like short length, odd sequencing, lacking in sound quality, over-reliance on the inclusion of pop songs for commercial purposes, etc.), and only through the expanded edition did the score really come to fruition. Examples: The Shadow, A.I.
     
    - The OST already presented a good distillation of the score and great listening experience, but the expanded edition made the whole architecture of the score come to life, to the point tracks already included on the OST are given a new whole dimension due to the context that surrounds them. Examples: Dracula, The Lost World.
     
    - The OST was a great album, but the score is simply too sprawling and plentiful in riches to the be contained to a single cd. Examples: The Empire Strikes Back, The Phantom Menace, Hook.
     
    - The OST was a perfect summation of the score and the extra music on the expanded edition, while interesting on its own, did not improve the listening experience. Examples: Ran, Batman, Jurassic Park.
     
    - The OST was a great album, but the choice of tracks included was influenced by other factors besides purely musical flow, so a better album assembly might have been possible had all the elements been available for inclusion. Examples: Sphere.
     
    - The OST was a great album assembly and the expanded score actually made the score seem worse. Examples: Masada, The Black Cauldron, The Fury.
     
    - The OST was a good presentation of the score and listening experience, but the expanded edition, while not being a perfect listening experience on its own, presents enough valid extra material for one's own improved playlist. Examples: Bram Stoker's Dracula, The Thin Red Line.
     
    - The expanded edition presents alternates that are great to listen on their own, even when completely removed from an album program. Examples: The Matrix Reloaded, Blade Runner.
     
    This is just meant to illustrate the plethora of nuances that might exist when discussing the merits and shortcomings of expanded editions. There can be no general stance or answer that applies to all situations.
     
     
     
     
  23. Like
    Romão got a reaction from TSMefford in The Official "Album Presentation vs Complete & Chronological Presentation" Thread Round 2   
    That's not so much the issue, it's more like you refuse to try anything on a pizza that has the same color or shape of a sardine, regardless of the flavor
     
     
    I apologize for that, I should not have made any personal judgments.
     
    The thing that gets me, though, it's your almost absolute dismissal of expanded editions on principle, disregarding a whole plethora of nuance. You are potentially depriving yourself of musical enjoyment and discovery.
     
    Mind you, I agree with you that often shorter albums do serve some scores better. That some composers know, better than most, how to properly assemble an album to showcase his musical intentions. That there's an unhealthy obsession with unearthing and having available everything single second of music recorded for a given score. We are in absolute agreement there. However, there are frequent nuanced situations:
     
    - The OST album and the expansion offer totally different, but valid,  listening experiences, without one replacing the other. Example: E.T., Jaws
     
    - The OST album was severely lacking in the way it presented the score (due to various factors, like short length, odd sequencing, lacking in sound quality, over-reliance on the inclusion of pop songs for commercial purposes, etc.), and only through the expanded edition did the score really come to fruition. Examples: The Shadow, A.I.
     
    - The OST already presented a good distillation of the score and great listening experience, but the expanded edition made the whole architecture of the score come to life, to the point tracks already included on the OST are given a new whole dimension due to the context that surrounds them. Examples: Dracula, The Lost World.
     
    - The OST was a great album, but the score is simply too sprawling and plentiful in riches to the be contained to a single cd. Examples: The Empire Strikes Back, The Phantom Menace, Hook.
     
    - The OST was a perfect summation of the score and the extra music on the expanded edition, while interesting on its own, did not improve the listening experience. Examples: Ran, Batman, Jurassic Park.
     
    - The OST was a great album, but the choice of tracks included was influenced by other factors besides purely musical flow, so a better album assembly might have been possible had all the elements been available for inclusion. Examples: Sphere.
     
    - The OST was a great album assembly and the expanded score actually made the score seem worse. Examples: Masada, The Black Cauldron, The Fury.
     
    - The OST was a good presentation of the score and listening experience, but the expanded edition, while not being a perfect listening experience on its own, presents enough valid extra material for one's own improved playlist. Examples: Bram Stoker's Dracula, The Thin Red Line.
     
    - The expanded edition presents alternates that are great to listen on their own, even when completely removed from an album program. Examples: The Matrix Reloaded, Blade Runner.
     
    This is just meant to illustrate the plethora of nuances that might exist when discussing the merits and shortcomings of expanded editions. There can be no general stance or answer that applies to all situations.
     
     
     
     
  24. Like
    Romão got a reaction from GerateWohl in John Williams - Choral pieces   
    I would add:
     
    Gloria The Temple of Doom  
     
  25. Like
    Romão got a reaction from Bayesian in The Official "Album Presentation vs Complete & Chronological Presentation" Thread Round 2   
    That's not so much the issue, it's more like you refuse to try anything on a pizza that has the same color or shape of a sardine, regardless of the flavor
     
     
    I apologize for that, I should not have made any personal judgments.
     
    The thing that gets me, though, it's your almost absolute dismissal of expanded editions on principle, disregarding a whole plethora of nuance. You are potentially depriving yourself of musical enjoyment and discovery.
     
    Mind you, I agree with you that often shorter albums do serve some scores better. That some composers know, better than most, how to properly assemble an album to showcase his musical intentions. That there's an unhealthy obsession with unearthing and having available everything single second of music recorded for a given score. We are in absolute agreement there. However, there are frequent nuanced situations:
     
    - The OST album and the expansion offer totally different, but valid,  listening experiences, without one replacing the other. Example: E.T., Jaws
     
    - The OST album was severely lacking in the way it presented the score (due to various factors, like short length, odd sequencing, lacking in sound quality, over-reliance on the inclusion of pop songs for commercial purposes, etc.), and only through the expanded edition did the score really come to fruition. Examples: The Shadow, A.I.
     
    - The OST already presented a good distillation of the score and great listening experience, but the expanded edition made the whole architecture of the score come to life, to the point tracks already included on the OST are given a new whole dimension due to the context that surrounds them. Examples: Dracula, The Lost World.
     
    - The OST was a great album, but the score is simply too sprawling and plentiful in riches to the be contained to a single cd. Examples: The Empire Strikes Back, The Phantom Menace, Hook.
     
    - The OST was a perfect summation of the score and the extra music on the expanded edition, while interesting on its own, did not improve the listening experience. Examples: Ran, Batman, Jurassic Park.
     
    - The OST was a great album, but the choice of tracks included was influenced by other factors besides purely musical flow, so a better album assembly might have been possible had all the elements been available for inclusion. Examples: Sphere.
     
    - The OST was a great album assembly and the expanded score actually made the score seem worse. Examples: Masada, The Black Cauldron, The Fury.
     
    - The OST was a good presentation of the score and listening experience, but the expanded edition, while not being a perfect listening experience on its own, presents enough valid extra material for one's own improved playlist. Examples: Bram Stoker's Dracula, The Thin Red Line.
     
    - The expanded edition presents alternates that are great to listen on their own, even when completely removed from an album program. Examples: The Matrix Reloaded, Blade Runner.
     
    This is just meant to illustrate the plethora of nuances that might exist when discussing the merits and shortcomings of expanded editions. There can be no general stance or answer that applies to all situations.
     
     
     
     
×
×
  • Create New...